LumberJocks

Using the garbage for...well....garbage. Challenge 09

  • Advertise with us
Project by Ryan Shervill posted 05-06-2010 07:19 PM 2266 views 3 times favorited 19 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Using the garbage for...well....garbage.  Challenge 09
Using the garbage for...well....garbage.  Challenge 09 No picture No picture No picture No picture No picture
Zoom Pictures

When I read the challenge09 contest description and saw the part about reducing your footprint for earth day, I knew I had the perfect project at the end of the driveway. I recently completed a project with TREX composite and had some left over. Now TREX is pretty green in itself as it uses all recycled plastic and wood material to make up the decking, but there is one problem: What do you do with the left overs? It cant be re-recycled, can’t be burned…..it would normally just go to landfill. Same goes for the leftover vinyl siding from building my new shop: No “green” way to get rid of it.

So I got thinking….rather than put my scraps IN the garbage, why not build something to put the garbage in? :-D

I came up with this garbage box and built it in a day. Seeing as it is 100% trex and siding, I never have to worry about this one rotting, and it should last pretty much forever. Most importantly, it keep the material from going to landfill.

Oh yeah, and the gorilla glue conection? GG is the only adhesive I have found that will actually glue pieces of TREX together, so that’s what I used.

Thanks for looking!

Ryan

-- Want to see me completely transform a house? Look here: http://forum.canadianwoodworking.com/showthread.php?41055





19 comments so far

View David's profile

David

110 posts in 1999 days


#1 posted 05-06-2010 07:32 PM

Nice! I need to build something very similiar for my small apt building. Where do you buy Trex? Nice design.
David

-- dcutter

View OutPutter's profile

OutPutter

1194 posts in 2642 days


#2 posted 05-06-2010 07:44 PM

Hi Ryan,

You made me think a little with this post. Trex can’t be recycled? That’s weird. How can a “green” product not be recyclable? And reducing your footprint? How do you reduce your footprint for a day by working in the shop? Using hand tools still means turing on the lights doesn’t it? Wouldn’t it be better to sit in the dark and do nothing? Nice garbage bin though. How’s the siding attached to the frame?

Best,

-- Jim

View Cozmo35's profile

Cozmo35

2198 posts in 1687 days


#3 posted 05-06-2010 07:59 PM

Kewel Project. Nicely done!

-- If you don't work, you don't eat!.....Garland, TX

View Ryan Shervill's profile

Ryan Shervill

278 posts in 2464 days


#4 posted 05-06-2010 08:06 PM

Hi Ryan,

You made me think a little with this post. Trex can’t be recycled? That’s weird. How can a “green” product not be recyclable? And reducing your footprint? How do you reduce your footprint for a day by working in the shop? Using hand tools still means turing on the lights doesn’t it? Wouldn’t it be better to sit in the dark and do nothing? Nice garbage bin though. How’s the siding attached to the frame?

Best,

—Jim

Hi Jim.

How is it green? Well…...

Trex is an environmentally friendly company because it obtains plastic and wood fibers from recycled resources, according to Trex.com. These recycled resources include recycled plastic grocery bags and used pallets from woodworking jobs. Trex is one of the largest plastic bag recycling companies in the United States. Each year Trex prevents 300,000 tons of plastic and wood from being placed in a landfill through its recycling practices, the company says. Making a Trex fence does not require cutting down a single tree. The packaging used for Trex products is also made of recycled paper and plastic.

I should expand on the recycllabillity: It isn’t accepted for recycling in MY municipality…it may very well be at others.

As far as reducing my footprint with the project: The project was built outside using cordless tools, and by using my leftovers to build this box I saved: The trees that would have otherwise been cut down to furnish the wood to build the same, saved the emissions of the truck required to take it to the dump, prevented another couple of plastic garbage bags from going to landfill, and most importanly: Put what would otherwise be trash to good use…..Think of this aspect as the “re-use” part of the three R’s (reduce-re use-recycle)

The siding is just screwed in place on the inside :)

Ryan

-- Want to see me completely transform a house? Look here: http://forum.canadianwoodworking.com/showthread.php?41055

View OutPutter's profile

OutPutter

1194 posts in 2642 days


#5 posted 05-06-2010 08:26 PM

You’r killing me Ryan. Now I hope you take this in a lighthearted exchange. lol Here goes.

If the formula for Trex includes wood products, you can’t have Trex without wood, therefore; it requires trees to be cut down. Redirecting a wood product doesn’t reduce the number of trees needed, it increases it because more pallets have to be made for Trex and can’t be used by guys like me to make boxes. Same goes for the plastic. If they use it, somone else doesn’t. Also, I suspect the reason it isn’t accepted as a recyclable material is the combination of wood and plastic. Not good because one day, no matter how long you think it will last, it will all end up in the land fill, not recycled. Less green than pure plastic or pure wood I think.

Your cordless tools still used electricity. If you let the Trex sit in a pile in your yard, the truck doesn’t emit anything either. Choosing not to build anything doesn’t use up any trees or Trex for that matter. Again, the most reduction in footprint would have been to sit in the dark and do nothing. (I don’t recommend this.)

PS – Were the screws new?

-- Jim

View Ryan Shervill's profile

Ryan Shervill

278 posts in 2464 days


#6 posted 05-06-2010 08:35 PM

Sigh…..I guess those 300000 tons of plastic would be better off in landfill. The point is that it takes material which would otherwise be buried in landfill and gives it new use: The 2nd AND third R’s. You can spin it however you’d like, but the fact remains that this year 300,000 TONS of post consumer waste is being made into something usefull (like my garbage box :) ) that would otherwise be buried. Who knows, maybe by the time this garbage box is in need of replacement (many many many years from now) recycling technology will have advanced to the point where they can use my old TREX to make bio fuel or something. Either way, it’s still FAR better for the environment to have recycled materials performing a function at the end of my drivew3ay than to have the same buried in a pit somewhere.

I think next time I feel the need to do a project I’ll just pull the catalytic converters off of my 1 ton, re-do the interior in baby seal and panda skin and see how long it can idle on a tank of diesel.

LOL…perhaps we should move to the coffee lounge if you want to discuss it further…it’s kind of going O/T in this thread.

-- Want to see me completely transform a house? Look here: http://forum.canadianwoodworking.com/showthread.php?41055

View Jason's profile

Jason

655 posts in 2160 days


#7 posted 05-06-2010 08:41 PM

This got WAY too serious so I’ll just say good job.

-- Jason - Colorado Springs

View Dustmite97's profile

Dustmite97

430 posts in 1872 days


#8 posted 05-06-2010 09:00 PM

This is a great idea. I think that this is a fantastic use of leftover TREX.

View OutPutter's profile

OutPutter

1194 posts in 2642 days


#9 posted 05-07-2010 12:08 AM

Hmmm… OK…. Ryan, do you really believe that Trex reduced the amount of plastic in your local landfill? I don’t believe that. I believe that all the plastic that can be recycled is yanked out of the trash stream by the people who pick up my trash no matter what. It doesn’t matter if Trex is dead or alive. They do it. Really, they do. If Trex goes bankrupt tomorrow, they’ll keep doing it too. Honest. It doesn’t matter if they can’t sell it to Trex. They’ll do it.

Trex is really just making you think “I’m green when I buy their product so I’m a good person” with their marketing. I don’t mind if you fall for it. But, don’t be offended when I don’t. Just sayin’.

Also, you don’t seem to get the law of alternatives. You can’t justify your behavior by saying “what I did is right because I could have done something a lot worse and I didn’t”. You can only justify your behavior by saying “I chose the best alternative available”. Your best alternative regarding your “footprint” was to sit at home in the dark, if you’re just a regular person like me.

Now, go build something and don’t feel guilty about using a little energy or trees or glue. You deserve it.

Baby seal? Too funny, lol.

-- Jim

View Viking's profile

Viking

857 posts in 1846 days


#10 posted 05-07-2010 12:31 AM

Ryan;

Nice garbage box! Thanks for sharing a great idea.

Good Luck!

-- Rick Gustafson - Lost Creek Ranch - Colorado County, Texas

View Ryan Shervill's profile

Ryan Shervill

278 posts in 2464 days


#11 posted 05-07-2010 12:45 AM

sigh….....I guess you really can’t please everyone all the time…I surrender.

I can at least take solace in the knowledge that everything else aside, I prevented THIS trex and vinyl from going to landfill, of that there is no doubt….’cause I was the one who was going to send it there ;-).

Now back on topic (please?)

Thanks everyone for the compliments. It was actually kind of fun to break away from the fine woodworking aspect of my business and go at something that didn’t have to be built to perfection :) (and could actually be built in 1 afternoon!) I managed to get about 2 1/2 years out of my last (wooden) box, but it’s life was sadly ended in a tragic mishap with a snow plow…..hopefully this one will be around for a while.

-- Want to see me completely transform a house? Look here: http://forum.canadianwoodworking.com/showthread.php?41055

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2812 days


#12 posted 05-07-2010 12:47 AM

Great idea; great use of leftover pieces of stuff, giving them a new life and preventing the purchase of new materials..

AND—it looks BEAUTIFUL. A great job.

You were definitely up for this fun CHALLENGE :)

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View gbear's profile

gbear

393 posts in 2750 days


#13 posted 05-07-2010 01:56 AM

Great job and great reuse of materials Ryan, something we should all strive to do when possible.

-- gbear, Carmichael, CA

View Jayp413's profile

Jayp413

69 posts in 1661 days


#14 posted 05-07-2010 03:07 PM

I’m all about giving scrap materials a second life. You without a doubt did a service to the enviorment by reusing a material that would otherwise be dropped in a landfill forever. The box looks great! Nice job!

View OutPutter's profile

OutPutter

1194 posts in 2642 days


#15 posted 05-07-2010 03:14 PM

What’s with the bad rap on landfills? Just think, in a couple hundred years, the landfills are gonna have a lot of good mulch. Plus, if recycling technology keeps improving, they’ll be like a gold mine of materials not long from now. Here’s a fun thing to do. See if you can spot a landfill in Google Earth. You may be surprised how tiny those things can be when looked at from a global perspective.

-- Jim

showing 1 through 15 of 19 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase