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My first turning ever - a mallet.

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Project by mafe posted 05-04-2010 12:13 AM 1819 views 3 times favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Jubiiiiiiiiii…......... My first wood turning ever! And my first wood lathe.
I had a offer the other day that I could not resist, a 1 year old lathe with some tools, at a good price (app half).
So it was time to take my first steps into this.
A walk in the forest where they just took down some trees, and I had some fresh wood to try with.
And what a pleasure, to see this piece of wood transform into something usefull, and at the same time, smell the wood, and be coverd in wood chips! I loved every moment. Even it’s not a expensive fancy bench, I have the feeling, that it will give me plenty of quality hours in the years to come.
For now I have a new mallet for my wooden chisels.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.





20 comments so far

View lew's profile

lew

10030 posts in 2408 days


#1 posted 05-04-2010 12:28 AM

Nice!!

This shape has become my personal favorite.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View BarbS's profile

BarbS

2434 posts in 2738 days


#2 posted 05-04-2010 12:41 AM

A most useful project! Enjoy the new lathe… you’ll find it highly addictive among woodworking pursuits.

-- http://barbsid.blogspot.com/

View 3DBMe's profile

3DBMe

132 posts in 2337 days


#3 posted 05-04-2010 01:13 AM

Glad to see you have something that makes you proud and fills your senses! You are now an addict! Congratulations.

-- http://www.brucemgil.us/

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11442 posts in 1758 days


#4 posted 05-04-2010 05:00 AM

Hey Mafe, congratulations!!!!!!
Welcome to the world of turning. You’ll really enjoy it because you can make a finished project in a little time compared to a cabinet or chair etc.
Remember turn fast and sand slow!
That looks like a pretty good sized lathe you bought, too. What is that aluminum looking part on the front? A duplicator??

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View docholladay's profile

docholladay

1286 posts in 1712 days


#5 posted 05-04-2010 05:06 AM

There are two things that come with owning a lathe. 1) It is fun and it is addictive. You will find yourself saving pieces of wood, everything from lumber to pieces of logs that you find on the street, just to see what it might “TURN” into. 2) You get very proficient at sharpening your turning tools. Virtually every turning session either begins with or ends with sharpening your tools. Especially if you do some turning of some tough woods like hickory. And even more especially if the wood happens to be dry.

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

View Gar's profile

Gar

84 posts in 1987 days


#6 posted 05-04-2010 06:02 AM

exzact lathe as mine only not the same color. That is the style mallet I use in my saddle making and the wood shop. I like it better than the hammer style. good job.

-- GAR

View FordMike's profile

FordMike

155 posts in 2124 days


#7 posted 05-04-2010 07:04 AM

Mallets are addictive to make especially out of wet/green wood. I remove a significant quantity of backyard and street trees and I’am always losing wedges and mallets, my solution was to make them from scraps and if I lose them no great loss. I tease my wife that the wedges are $100.00 each and the chain and gas are free on every job, she does’nt buy it but I try. Next time make one with a bigger hear thats tapered from the top to the bottom of the head, it will be easier to use, they also make great chicken/abalone pounders. Good luck and a great start

View KnifeL's profile

KnifeL

86 posts in 1605 days


#8 posted 05-04-2010 07:06 AM

Excellent mallet! What kind of wood is it? I agree with all about how you will become addicted to turning, however I suggest the exact opposite than Jim’s style, start slow, as slow as possible, work you’re way up and save the top speed only for sanding and finishing. I find that gives me the best result, low tearout and high sheen…

-- Will in Boulder, CO

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1768 days


#9 posted 05-04-2010 04:46 PM

congrat´s with the first born…...LOL …doesn´t look so bad Mads
maybee a mallet to the light side try one with a bigger head next time

Dennis

View Houtje's profile

Houtje

299 posts in 1625 days


#10 posted 05-04-2010 04:57 PM

A great job…
Nice mallet and don’t chop all the trees down :-)

View Diggerjacks's profile

Diggerjacks

1755 posts in 1792 days


#11 posted 05-04-2010 08:02 PM

A great job for the first project

-- Diggerjack-France ---The only limit is the limit of the mind and the mind has no limit

View mafe's profile

mafe

9509 posts in 1742 days


#12 posted 05-05-2010 12:21 AM

Hi guys and girls,
Thank you so much for the sweet words after my little happyness outburst.
I just ordered a book of how to use the lathe, so perhaps I will learn a little this way, otherwise I gues the place to learn are by the lathe.
Yes the mallet are small, I always dreamed of having a small one for finer woodworking, and now it was possible. I will like to make my self a big hammerstyle mallet also, but this will not be a lathe project.
I guess that I have to finish sand, oil and so on after the wood are dry, since I thought it was allmost impossible on the green wood?
I will try to leave a few trees in the local forest…
Thank you again,

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View woodcrafter47's profile

woodcrafter47

349 posts in 1758 days


#13 posted 05-05-2010 12:35 AM

Keep turning ,Great first,then comes a lot more to try .
What fun it is ,Keep up the good work.

-- In His service ,Richard

View stefang's profile

stefang

13024 posts in 1987 days


#14 posted 05-05-2010 01:07 PM

Congratulations on your new lathe and your first turning too Mads! If you want to turn a recess in the top and fill with lead, it’s easy to buy the industrial sized solder sticks (about 10mm square in profile), melt in a pan on the stove and pour into the recess. The added weight gives the mallet a firmer strike and it’s easier too.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9509 posts in 1742 days


#15 posted 05-07-2010 11:37 AM

Ohhhh – I came into the toolshop, and there are now a big crack in the mallet!
So now I have a wooden Mallet with a crack in…

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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