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Fibonacci gauge- an exercise in brass, steel, and wood

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Project by TheFridge posted 04-23-2017 06:08 AM 2505 views 2 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Fibonacci gauge- an exercise in brass, steel, and wood
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the goal was to figure out how to case something with brass and 1/16 rod and river it together. A useable tool at the end would be a plus. That part didn’t quite work out. Anyway.

Started with .050 (I think) brass sheet, 5/16w X 5/8L rivets (they were a hair long, will try shorter next time, prob 3/8), 1/16 brass and O1 tool steel rods, and a leopardwood turning blank. Finish is shellac and wax.

Cut it with an 80t blade on sled. Worked well. Trimmed to edge and then cut a strip a hair less than 3/4. I put a piece of scrap over the cut so brass chips wouldn’t go everywhere. Didn’t help a whole lot really.

Left- brass peened with hammer. Center- O1 peened with hammer. Right- brass peened with center punch.

Brass blended in too well after filing and when using a punch it was easy to go to deep. So O1 with a hammer it was.

I figured out after some other test pins that cutting the pins 1/16 long for 1/32 extra on each side.

Also discovered that you don’t wail away when peening small rod. You work the edges then middle, rinse and repeat as necessary. Flip the piece and do the same to the other side, while making sure to tap the brass casing down so it doesnt get caught with a gap between it and the wood. When I started out just hammering on the pin with moving it, it ended up kinking inside the wood and breaking it out. Spreading the blows around was slower but I never had a problem with a pin after going with that process.

Rounded the corners on a disc sander. Finished all brass with a fine mill file before I went to sand paper.

Unfortunately I learned that a center punch doesn’t necessarily equate to an accurately drilled hole. Also that my something is off with my cross slide vise. Also trying to kill at one time or another hasn’t been kind to my drill press quill or bearings. So some of my hole got off. Bad. Will try a spotting or center drill next time and have the ways on my vise milled somewhere besides china.

When I make an other I’ll probably use a finer grained wood. Seal the pores before filing. And do a better job of locating holes.

This one came out great for what I was trying to accomplish overall but not so great for an accurate 1:1.618 ratio between the points.

Thanks for looking. Hope this encourages someone to try something similar. I’d be glad to answer any questions about the process if I can.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.





15 comments so far

View Brit's profile

Brit

7309 posts in 2655 days


#1 posted 04-23-2017 06:20 AM

Sounds like you learnt a lot along the way there Fridge that will stand you in great stead for future projects like this. It looks a damn sight better than mine would have been. You showed some dogged determination to get to the finish line too. Well done buddy!

-- https://www.clickasnap.com/Andy61 - Andy - Old Chinese proverb says: "If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it."

View Don W's profile (online now)

Don W

18509 posts in 2380 days


#2 posted 04-23-2017 11:36 AM

Excellent first try. Did you slightly taper the holes before peening? It makes a stronger joint.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View AnthonyReed's profile

AnthonyReed

9387 posts in 2252 days


#3 posted 04-23-2017 12:04 PM

Sounds like there were a couple steep learning curves to surmount in order to achieve accuracy. It’s beautiful regardless.

Thanks for sharing your process with us Fridge. I’ll love seeing how you will put one to use and what lines it will help you cast in your projects.

-- ~Tony

View Woodwrecker's profile

Woodwrecker

4087 posts in 3388 days


#4 posted 04-23-2017 02:40 PM

Sounds to me like the experience and learning process was worth the effort.
I bet your next one will be ten times more accurate.
Thank you for all the tips & information.

-- Eric, central Florida / Utor praemia operibus duris

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8137 posts in 1298 days


#5 posted 04-23-2017 03:13 PM

Brit, thanks man.

Don- thank. I did not but will try next time.

WW- thanks bud, I hope so.

Edit: tony I forgot you! You’re a sweetheart!

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

3560 posts in 2221 days


#6 posted 04-23-2017 04:19 PM

May not be as accurate as you would have liked but looks like a fine woodworking tool, real work of art!

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8137 posts in 1298 days


#7 posted 04-23-2017 04:40 PM

Thanks man. I always like the way the old Stanley folding rules looked with their pinned brass.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10462 posts in 2192 days


#8 posted 04-23-2017 06:47 PM

Very nicely done

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View duckmilk's profile

duckmilk

2493 posts in 1137 days


#9 posted 04-23-2017 07:08 PM

What a great effort in building a difficult tool. It sure is purty.

-- "Duck and Bob would be out doin some farming with funny hats on." chrisstef

View mafe's profile

mafe

11625 posts in 2901 days


#10 posted 04-23-2017 09:39 PM

Fine work on that gauge, I do have a soft spot fore them.
Did you put something in the points?
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8137 posts in 1298 days


#11 posted 04-23-2017 10:48 PM

Thanks guys.

Mafe, I planned on casing the ends last but I left that step off since it would be rarely used.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View woodcox's profile

woodcox

1946 posts in 1824 days


#12 posted 04-24-2017 01:26 AM

That is a nice tool. Impressive undertaking, the Leopard and brass are striking.

-- "My god has more wood than your god" ... G. Carlin.

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1633 posts in 1706 days


#13 posted 04-24-2017 01:38 AM

Wow, good effort. I thought about making my own sector tool, which isn’t as complex but wondered how I would join two pieces of wood with a brass hinge somewhat like you did. I said – screw that! Ended up buying an old Stanley #62 folding rule and sanding out all the numbers. Maybe I wouldn’t have been so lazy if I had seen this first.

Found something by Schwarz from 2011 that said about folding rules: “I see them go for as little as 50 cents” at flea markets and eBay. Well, six years later, no they do not. I never see them at flea markets where I am, and on eBay you’re lucky to find one for less than $10.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8137 posts in 1298 days


#14 posted 04-24-2017 03:31 AM

Thanks girls. much appreciated :)

Col, I would’ve happily used boxwood if I could find it or a rule in 12” lengths. Might have to check that out.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View mafe's profile

mafe

11625 posts in 2901 days


#15 posted 04-25-2017 11:20 PM

;-)

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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