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Walnut 4-Pot Herb Tray

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Project by Jonathan posted 04-23-2010 09:40 PM 2219 views 1 time favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Fairly straightforward project here.

One piece of walnut, routered out, chiseled, sanded, and finished.

Never having made anything with a router before, this is my first project using one. I love my new Bosch 1617-variable speed router! I purchased the combo. and used the plunge router base for this project.

Hadn’t really done any chisel work on something like this either and am starting to get the hang of it.

I finished the wood with 3-applications of Watco Danish Oil (Natural) and then let it dry for 3-days. This morning, I put 2-coats of Johnson’s Paste Wax on it. The first coat, I used a cotton rag, then buffed it out with 0000 steel-wool. The second coat of wax was applied with the steel wool, then buffed out with a fresh steel wool pad, again 0000.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."





9 comments so far

View Walt M.'s profile

Walt M.

243 posts in 1730 days


#1 posted 04-23-2010 09:56 PM

Looks pretty nice there are so many things you can do with a router

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1770 days


#2 posted 04-23-2010 10:24 PM

I definitely made a couple of mistakes along the way.

Took the router a touch too far, and also tipped it once, creating a bit of a gouge at an edge. I was able to get rid of most of it, but ended up leaving a little bit of a dip there, as I didn’t want to make the edges too thin.

also went too deep with the chisel on the first go around, so ended up getting the router back out to try and clean everything up, going a bit deeper.

I’m actually glad I went deeper though, as I like the extra depth in the tray, compared to what I started with.

I figured this would be a good project to “practice” on, as it’s not a showpiece, and it’s just sitting in our kitchen at one of the windows.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Popsnsons's profile

Popsnsons

329 posts in 1701 days


#3 posted 04-23-2010 11:56 PM

Noce work…the pots fit like a glove. Add a router table to the arsenal and you’ll have hours of fun.

-- Pops ~ In So Cal...

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1770 days


#4 posted 04-24-2010 01:00 AM

A router table is actually the next thing on my list of tools to acquire.

I just picked-up a Ridgid 15501 drill press a couple of days ago.

I’m toying with the idea of converting my Powermatic 64a’s extension on the right side to a router table/insert, but will probably just end up getting a dedicated standalone router table. I do have several projects on my “to do” list that would be much easier with a router table.

As a sidenote, I will be curious to see how this holds-up over time. I say that because the herb pots do have a drain hole in the bottom of each one. I thought about applying poly, but decided to go with the wax as the final coat instead.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

1796 posts in 1829 days


#5 posted 04-24-2010 02:13 AM

I noticed that, too. You could put little ceramic bowls or plates under the flower pots.

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 2393 days


#6 posted 04-24-2010 02:16 AM

Beautiful tray.

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1770 days


#7 posted 04-24-2010 02:39 AM

AtomJack,

In all honesty, I sort of want to see how it holds up, so I’m not going to put anything under them. This was actually part of the reason for building the tray in the first place, so we didn’t need multiple saucers or a towel on the counter. I designed it to be more like a pan, so that if a little water does trickle out, it’ll be contained by the sides and won’t run all over the counter.

I also made a mistake when scoring my router lines. You can see it on the 4th picture. I scored the lines to be square with a razor knife, then decided to just leave the curve that the router bit left, as I liked how it complimented the roundness of the pots. Oh well. And I had scored the line deep enough, that I would’ve had to sand quite a bit more off the top to completely get rid of it.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View stefang's profile

stefang

13524 posts in 2054 days


#8 posted 04-28-2010 06:05 PM

Very nice job Jonathan. That Walnut is beautiful and I’m really impressed with your first time router work. Very clean lines to compliment the plants.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1770 days


#9 posted 04-28-2010 11:33 PM

Thanks for the kind words!

Mike, I tend to be a bit of a perfectionist, so even though it was my first time using a router, it should’ve been better. That’s all right, I feel like I’m learning a little bit every time I start using a new tool, or trying a new woodworking technique. I do feel like I’m growing, albeit slowly, but hey, up is up, right?

This particular herb tray project gave me just enough practice to familiarize myself with router basics. That allowed me to do a better job on a project I’ll probably be posting tomorrow or the next day. Just waiting for my friend to receive it before I post, just on the off chance that he logs on here and starts looking around. I don’t want to spoil his surprise.

I’m liking walnut right now, and that’s good because I still have a bit of it left. It would be gone in a heartbeat if I were to use it on a larger project, but for all the little things I’ve been making lately, it’s lasting and lasting. I also try to be selective about what part of the boards I use, cutting out and around anything I don’t like. I do save the scraps, as they may come in handy for something else.

I will probably use the router on the project I started this morning as well. I got tired of trying to keep up with my silly posting regarding the spelling of mantel vs. mantle. I couldn’t take it anymore and decided to go be productive. That thread got waaaay out of hand. It was supposed to be half-humorous, with my little smiley faces, etc. but it seems to have grown far larger than I expected it to.

At any rate, my new project is a drink/serving tray that I’ll be presenting as a host gift this Saturday at a Kentucky Derby party that’ll we’ll be attending. I’ll post it once it’s finished.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

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