LumberJocks

more urns and story behind them

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Project by tanglefoot posted 04-03-2017 11:47 PM 334 views 1 time favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

First off, Thank you all for your positive comments and support. The Urns started with the passing of my brother in law and my nieces cat a few years ago. I had just started to start woodworking as a hobby. A friend gave me a small shed of rough oak boards to play with. He passed away shortly afterwords.The family asked if I could supply an Urn for the deceased.
After this, I built a few projects and had wood left over and started using the scraps to make Urns for a Pet crematorium in town. Surprisingly, after a year non sold. I gave them to friends and charity auctions. Soon I started to get requests from friends for larger Urns for loved ones. After 12 Urns, I just kept using scraps from projects for Urns.
I just finished the two big ones for my wife and myself.
Interesting enough, I have four left and have never sold one yet. I either have to get less friends or a better marketing attitude (LOL).
I enjoy woodworking and improving my skills and the honesty of friends and family help to work at improving your abilities.





6 comments so far

View david38's profile

david38

3470 posts in 1950 days


#1 posted 04-04-2017 02:59 PM

very nice

View bushmaster's profile

bushmaster

1910 posts in 1890 days


#2 posted 04-04-2017 03:05 PM

Once your beautiful work gets known, people will be just dying to get into one.

-- Brian - Hazelton, British Columbia

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

4064 posts in 2851 days


#3 posted 04-04-2017 06:00 PM

Nice work. I have a question. I want to make an urn for myself. How big do you make it? I found out that a human body when incinerated, yields 2-1/2% of body weight in ashes. How does that equate to volume needed? I made an urn for my late brother-in-law, but I think I made it a bit too large. In my case, I calculated my remains would be about 6.5 pounds.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

25375 posts in 2474 days


#4 posted 04-04-2017 07:27 PM

You really do a wonderful job on these urns. Congratulations.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View americancanuck's profile

americancanuck

318 posts in 2217 days


#5 posted 04-05-2017 12:34 PM

MrRon the rule of thumb is to make 1 cubic inch of interior space for each pound of pre cremation body weight. An 8”x8”x4” box made from 1/2” material yields 196 cubic inches, plenty big enough for most cremation ashes

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1150 posts in 255 days


#6 posted 04-05-2017 12:37 PM



MrRon the rule of thumb is to make 1 cubic inch of interior for each pound of pre cremation body weight. An 8”x8”x4” box made from 1/2” material yields 196 cubic inches, plenty big enough for most cremation ashes

- americancanuck

As a funeral director/embalmer I need to inform you that the volume of an urn is 200 cubic inches … body weight plays no part. A 200 cubic inch (inside volume) urn will house the cremated remains of a 110 pound woman or a 600 pound man. Keepsake and jewelry urns are a fraction of this volume and can vary. Any questions, please ask.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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