LumberJocks

Very Basic Construction Lumber TV Stand From Douglas Fir 2X

  • Advertise with us
Project by TObenhuber posted 03-27-2017 12:05 AM 1088 views 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This was my first attempt at getting commissioned. I don’t think I will do it again because I don’t think the appreciation is out there for the amount of work it takes to build something like this. I know this for sure based on the low ball request that I must have been out of my mind to agree to. But, that’s beside the point. Then again, I am also going to post pictures on the local online yard sales and craigslist to see if I can get any interest. Then only accept a more reasonable amount for a commissioned custom projects like this and count this inital project as advertising cost. Otherwise, as many of you are familiar, the honey do list will be plenty.

I am very proud of this project. As always, I started on Sketchup. Probably the most useful tool in my entire shop. This project is solid wood with no metal parts. I constructed it out of Douglas Fir 2X12. I let it all settle in my workshop for about 3 weeks to attempt to let it balance its moisture content. Then I milled all of the boards to rough lengths and then ripped out all of the heart wood on the tablesaw. This left plenty of waist but mostly ””rift/quarter sawn lumber. Lamination…You all understand that part. Then the basic construction was to pilot hole, place holder screws, remove the screws one at a time, drill 3/4” holes, and glue 3/4” dowels in. Lots of sanding. Then two coats of clear. I might need to lightly sand one more time and apply one more clear coat. We will see.

All around, this is going to be used as a TV/Entertainment center. It is pretty heavy. If they don’t use it for a TV, I think there are plenty of giants out there that would really appreciate a vastly over sized 5 board bench.

Thanks for check out my project!!! Its was fun!!!

-- Travis, Virginia, www.facebook.com/CreativeWoodworksHybla





8 comments so far

View luv2learn's profile

luv2learn

2620 posts in 1993 days


#1 posted 03-27-2017 01:08 AM

You did a great job on the design/build of the TV stand Travis. In general, people have little conception of the time it takes to make hand crafted items, that is why I don’t take on commissioned projects. One of two things usually happen, either they believe I overcharged them and are upset, or, I under charge them and I am upset. Either way, it is not worth it to me.

-- Lee - Northern idaho~"If the women don't find you handsome, at least they ought to find you handy"~ Red Green

View TObenhuber's profile

TObenhuber

154 posts in 1283 days


#2 posted 03-27-2017 01:42 AM


One of two things usually happen, either they believe I overcharged them and are upset, or, I under charge them and I am upset. Either way, it is not worth it to me.

- luv2learn

Thank you!!! Means a lot!!!

I better understand that I will have more fun making things for my wife. I will continue to slowly sell projects I actually enjoy making on the local online yard sales and craigslist. Feels like a huge win every time that works.

I have a picnic table and benches to build currently on the honey do list. That will be a fun project. Might end up working on a bathroom remodel. Then on to the Cole's Rocker hopefully. Probably by then the Oak will be down around 5% or 10%. Its getting close as it is right now.

-- Travis, Virginia, www.facebook.com/CreativeWoodworksHybla

View Calmudgeon's profile

Calmudgeon

112 posts in 1118 days


#3 posted 03-27-2017 04:28 AM

Give clients a quote and stick to it. If they accept it, they can’t be upset with the price. If they reject it, neither they nor you can be upset either. That’s business.

Don’t dicker on price. You can change specifications (materials, build method, scope) to reduce price, but don’t lower your price on a given quote once you’ve presented it.

Value your time according to what you feel your level of craftsmanship deserves.

Sometimes you’ll underestimate the time a project takes. Learn from it.

Log your hours and materials with each project. Use that log/calculation to better inform your next quote so that you don’t cheat yourself. Always build a cushion into each quote and remember to include an allowance for the following:
  • Consumables (sandpaper, glue, wear and tear on cutting tools, ...)
  • Time spent making the quote itself
  • Time spent on design, drawings, ...
  • Travel to pick up materials
  • Delivery
  • If installation is involved – time to pack up tools and materials, time to unpack, ...

Focus on making the client happy with the quality of the product and not with its price.
Focus on work you enjoy doing; you’ll do it better than work you feel compelled to do.

When you have a happy client, ask for permission to post photos of the project on social media. Often an awareness built by this kind of word-of-mouth can gradually transform into a small business.

Take your time, both with your work and with your sales expectations.

-- "As are the things we make, so are we ourselves." - Lin Yutang

View TObenhuber's profile

TObenhuber

154 posts in 1283 days


#4 posted 03-27-2017 07:13 AM



Give clients a quote and stick to it. If they accept it, they can t be upset with the price. If they reject it, neither they nor you can be upset either. That s business.

Don t dicker on price. You can change specifications (materials, build method, scope) to reduce price, but don t lower your price on a given quote once you ve presented it.

Value your time according to what you feel your level of craftsmanship deserves.

Sometimes you ll underestimate the time a project takes. Learn from it.

Log your hours and materials with each project. Use that log/calculation to better inform your next quote so that you don t cheat yourself. Always build a cushion into each quote and remember to include an allowance for the following:
  • Consumables (sandpaper, glue, wear and tear on cutting tools, ...)
  • Time spent making the quote itself
  • Time spent on design, drawings, ...
  • Travel to pick up materials
  • Delivery
  • If installation is involved – time to pack up tools and materials, time to unpack, ...

Focus on making the client happy with the quality of the product and not with its price.
Focus on work you enjoy doing; you ll do it better than work you feel compelled to do.

When you have a happy client, ask for permission to post photos of the project on social media. Often an awareness built by this kind of word-of-mouth can gradually transform into a small business.

Take your time, both with your work and with your sales expectations.

- Calmudgeon

Very good points!!! I definitely know this one is a learning experience and use it for experimenting/exposure. I’m going to have to probably explain that to this person who this is for.

I think the quote I gave sounded ok/good to me to start before I started saving reciepts and calculating time. Now, it will probably barely cover materials and an hourly rate of about 2ยข an hour for sanding alone. Didn’t want to compromise my sense of quality to much to fit the budget. Bummer but I’ll learn better next time. Never expect to match my hourly rate at my real job but I’ll come up with something I feel better about next time.

Thanks for the insight.

-- Travis, Virginia, www.facebook.com/CreativeWoodworksHybla

View luv2learn's profile

luv2learn

2620 posts in 1993 days


#5 posted 03-27-2017 03:56 PM

Here is another alternative Travis, make something you think will sell, put a price on it, and see what happens. If someone buys it they are saying they think your price is fair. You priced the item, so evidently you think its a fair value. :-)

-- Lee - Northern idaho~"If the women don't find you handsome, at least they ought to find you handy"~ Red Green

View TObenhuber's profile

TObenhuber

154 posts in 1283 days


#6 posted 03-27-2017 06:42 PM



Here is another alternative Travis, make something you think will sell, put a price on it, and see what happens. If someone buys it they are saying they think your price is fair. You priced the item, so evidently you think its a fair value. :-)

- luv2learn

That’s pretty much what I do with five board benches and really enjoy doing it. They are very solid and generally very cheap on lumber since I take almost all of it from the cull lumber rack at the BORG. All the parts get laminated, run through the planer, light sanding, screws, replaced with wood dowels and finished. I can knock these out for roughly $20 and sell them for $75-$100. This gives me roughly $10 a labor/hour. It just usually requires some time to sell but folks love them.

Planning out a pocket hole version I might be able to build faster.

-- Travis, Virginia, www.facebook.com/CreativeWoodworksHybla

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

26764 posts in 2557 days


#7 posted 05-15-2017 11:13 AM

This TV stand turned out beautifully.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View TObenhuber's profile

TObenhuber

154 posts in 1283 days


#8 posted 05-15-2017 11:46 AM



This TV stand turned out beautifully.

Thanks man!!! I am glad the person who wanted it picked it up because it wasn’t going to fit in my car. Tiny VW golf. 8’ boards fit into it to get home but when assembled, not so much. Metro DC area life.

-- Travis, Virginia, www.facebook.com/CreativeWoodworksHybla

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com