LumberJocks

Hey, one more plane

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Project by Daren Nelson posted 10-17-2007 03:13 AM 1563 views 1 time favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I see a trend towards posting handplanes we made/fixed…I like it. I am working on several, I will post an “experimental” in a few days. I found an old Stanley Bailey 28, it seemed to be trash. It looked like it had been thrown in a bucket of used motor oil and left, the wood was ruined. Really that could not have been a better thing, the steel was like new. I took the iron and made a repro wood body and handles from walnut and cherry. It works very well, I don’t think it looks too bad either. I made some changes to suit me in the push.
sb28

-- http://nelsonwoodworks.biz/





14 comments so far

View Dan'um Style's profile

Dan'um Style

12996 posts in 2638 days


#1 posted 10-17-2007 03:15 AM

very pretty piece ! hope you enjoyed the time you spent !!

-- keeping myself entertained ... Humor and fun lubricate the brain

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2752 days


#2 posted 10-17-2007 03:16 AM

Very nice. I want to rework a transitional jack plane (similar to this one) to use as a Scrub plane.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View David's profile

David

1970 posts in 2794 days


#3 posted 10-17-2007 03:34 AM

WOW! Absolutely beautiful. Nice work!

-- http://foldingrule.blogspot.com

View Max's profile

Max

55959 posts in 2928 days


#4 posted 10-17-2007 03:37 AM

Nice peice, I like the combination of woods that you use. Great job…

-- Max "Desperado", Salt Lake City, UT

View Davesfunwoodworking's profile

Davesfunwoodworking

272 posts in 2530 days


#5 posted 10-17-2007 03:41 AM

Very nice work. Nice way to bring the dead back to life. Great job!

-- Davesfunwoodworking

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4435 posts in 2617 days


#6 posted 10-17-2007 04:01 AM

good job, Daren, I’ll bet it does a good job. I like the walnut side panels. You know we might be onto something, laminateing these plane bases. Maybe more stable.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View cajunpen's profile

cajunpen

14392 posts in 2721 days


#7 posted 10-17-2007 06:59 AM

Very nice save. I like the idea of keeping these old hand tools in use. Makes you think about who used it before you.

-- Bill - "Suit yourself and let the rest be pleased." http://www.cajunpen.com/

View Paul's profile

Paul

649 posts in 2748 days


#8 posted 10-17-2007 04:50 PM

I’ve often come across wooden and transitional planes with wide open mouths (from wear) and have considered reworking them like this or with a patch in the mouth. In respect to replacing the whole block though – it seems as though I read some where that the reason beech was the preferred wood of most old planes was the tight grain, and lack of wood movement. Thus, you don’t usually find old planes made of oak, walnut, cherry, etc.

Has anyone who has refurbished a plane like this beautiful example by Darren experienced a problem later, or seasonally, with wood movement and/or the sole remaining flat?

Just curious . . . .

-- Paul, Texas

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2692 days


#9 posted 10-17-2007 05:13 PM

That’s a neat idea. Great reclaim!

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2752 days


#10 posted 10-17-2007 05:38 PM

Michael Dunbar’s book Restoring, Tuning and Using Classic woodworking tools has a chapter on restoring wood bench planes as well as transitional planes….

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Paul's profile

Paul

649 posts in 2748 days


#11 posted 10-17-2007 06:08 PM

Wayne -

I have that book. I’ll re-check it and see if that’s where I got my thought.

-- Paul, Texas

View Daren Nelson's profile

Daren Nelson

767 posts in 2561 days


#12 posted 10-17-2007 06:24 PM

Paul, my wood is quarter sawn (to start, some of the small pieces are flat sawn off the bigger 1/4 sawn ones) and kiln dried…I cannot see it moving too much? The lamination also has to help. I guess we will see in a few years. But once the wood is kiln dried and reaches equilibrium moisture content (EMC) in my shop is it stable from my knowledge of lumber. Not that it makes me an expert…but I do have a sawmill and my own kiln, I am in the lumber business.

-- http://nelsonwoodworks.biz/

View Paul's profile

Paul

649 posts in 2748 days


#13 posted 10-17-2007 09:06 PM

Daren -

You certainly have more experience and expertise than I have. I just threw that vague “knowledge” out there to see if a resulting conversation would clarify or refute it. Chalk one up for “refuted.”

-- Paul, Texas

View Daren Nelson's profile

Daren Nelson

767 posts in 2561 days


#14 posted 10-17-2007 11:35 PM

Paul, I was not trying to sound like a know it all. I just mentioned the step I took to try to avoid future failure. Like I said though, time will be the ultimate test.

-- http://nelsonwoodworks.biz/

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