LumberJocks

Equatorial African BUBINGA - "Waterfall" figuring - Bent-wood Bangle

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Project by Michael McKenzie posted 03-14-2017 07:23 AM 387 views 0 times favorited 2 comments Add to Favorites Watch

OK this wood had to be bought in veneer form and man is it wavy and hard. No way I could bend it for a ring but I had some success with the circumference of a bangle being a bit easier task. I was surprised that hot water alone did a fine job of softening it…I thought I was going to need a little glycerine solution.

The hardest part of this project was trying yet again to capture the figuring in a photograph. You almost need video. A little of the figuring effect appears in the vertical photo near highlight to the point that it look like relief.

let me know if you have any tips for working with figured woods. I learned the hard way that you can oversand “quilted” veneers. I ruined a smoked eucalyptus Bangle (it is actually underneath this as the base wood LOL)

-- "Ancora imparo! (Yet I am learning)." ~Michelangelo~ Inscribed on a device that represented an old man in a go-cart with an hour-glass mounted on it. Created when he was a very old man.





2 comments so far

View bushmaster's profile

bushmaster

1765 posts in 1857 days


#1 posted 03-14-2017 02:16 PM

A photograph seems to never do justice to a project, beauty of the wood is often lost. Bet it is real nice though

-- Brian - Hazelton, British Columbia

View Michael McKenzie's profile

Michael McKenzie

33 posts in 14 days


#2 posted 03-14-2017 08:03 PM


A photograph seems to never do justice to a project, beauty of the wood is often lost. Bet it is real nice though

- bushmaster

Thanks for the comment Bushmaster (like the snake?)

The closest I’ve gotten is using the macro lens – shooting 3 frames while on a tripod. First has the front in focus, the 2nd has the mid-range in focus and the 3rd has the back or lining in focus. When these are layered in photoshop you can combine all of the focused elements into one shot (as long as your camera didn’t move between shots) by erasing the unwanted parts of the top two layers. The result (ultimately) is a macro that has most of the item in detailed focus. I don’t do this with every piece, just the ones with special liners or design elements that get obscured in a regular macro shot. Look at the White Tulipwood Ring with the Spalted Maple Lining. That is an example of using this “sandwich” technique.

Thanks again – Be well

Michael

-- "Ancora imparo! (Yet I am learning)." ~Michelangelo~ Inscribed on a device that represented an old man in a go-cart with an hour-glass mounted on it. Created when he was a very old man.

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