LumberJocks

Drill Indexing jig for small parts.

  • Advertise with us
Project by LittleBlackDuck posted 03-12-2017 12:25 AM 1086 views 2 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch

One of my passions is T&J model toys for which the requirements call for drilling a number of small holes, ranging from 3 to 20+ over a small circumference to simulate nuts etc… on vehicles’ rims.

While I have the luxury of a laser that makes life easier for me, my meds mush have kicked in and gone into overdrive forcing me to come up with a “manual” means of achieving this particular swiss-cheese affect in the aforementioned little bits of timber.

Starting with SketchUp, I designed a very basic jig,

cut it out on the laser, assembled it and realised I needed more medication as I was so far off the mark that my bulls eye was the size of an ants eye (??? yeh… me neither… must be the meds). So back to the drawing board and finally evolved an acceptable configuration that was buildable by even me.

I needed an indexing mechanism and came up with a spring loaded ball bearing which engaged holes laid out in an organized fashion along the circumference of a circle. After many futile attempts I finally achieved that goal.

This was then followed by the comical picture of me crawling across the breadth and width of my workshop trying to track down those little ball bearing suckers that were turned into non directional missiles by the mishandling of the compression spring whose sole purpose was to control the entire mechanism and not impersonate a lethal ballistic weapon. No sooner I found that obnoxious ball bearing, I managed to launch the spring into a non-accessible (which was always the case when I managed to observe it’s irrational trajectory) part of the workshop. Because of their small size I tried replacing the 8mm ball bearings with tennis balls but for some reason the fur on the tennis balls hindered smooth operation, so with hesitation, I surrendered that ingenious piece if inspiration. After bulk buying a heap of 8mm ball bearings and exhausting our local supplier’s supply of small springs I finally managed to assemble the unit. I wanted to super glue the spring and the ball bearing so they wouldn’t fly off, and if they did, they’d stick together, however, I managed to super glue my fingers together so I abandoned that pragmatic circumvention and proceeded to further bolstered my stock of those 2 under estimated perishables.

In the gallery pictures, I have tried to display what the jig can create and here is a link of how NOT to present a video of the jig in use, if you don’t want to beffudle your audience.

If you find you are/were going to sleep watching the video, watch the next few pictures at a more leisurely pace.
These are the components of the jig. Check out the 8mm ball bearing perched precariously on the spring.



“3, 4, 6, 8 and 24” configuration index wheel bolted into place with the “5, 10 and 20” indexer lurking in the background waiting to pounce.



Packer to straddle washer and 1/2 nut.



A well traveled “zero clearance” insert mounted.



Unfortunately I could have saved myself a heap of grief by just staying faithful to my laser and left the jig on the drawing board… (just kidding).

A novel addition to the jig was a ¼” to 8mm (or 5/16” in Yankee speak) packer/sleeve printed on my 3D printer. T&J models are designed with either a ¼” or 5/15” axle diameter that in the past required 2 different sized spindles for fabricating wheels and rims. With these little sleeves I can use ¼” bolts for both sizes. I have made various lengths of these packers to use as required.


Another feature of the jig is the cutting of the indexing wheel as a 250 toothed gear shape to simulate an easy to handle knurled knob. The wheel eventually worked even better after I sanded the teeth off because the small teeth hurt my delicate hands… (just gagging).

While the laser has made the indexing wheel a simple operation for me, a good compass, keen eye sight and a sharp drill bit will keep you amused for many a days before you seek out a laser cutting organisation to cut an accurate one for yourself.

PS. Late extra.
For anyone interested (in the concept) finding the right spring can be a nightmare. To get you started, this is a picture of the spring’s specificarion,

at least the specs on the packet may be a good starter. The spring is “countersunk’ through 2 layers of 6mm MDF… for all you non mathematicians … this is 12mm (even for large values of 6).

PPS. For those with eyesight as bad as mine, the measurements are 1/4 x 1-3/8 x .20… the spring that is… not the bag.

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD





16 comments so far

View Pjonesy's profile

Pjonesy

151 posts in 433 days


#1 posted 03-12-2017 01:15 AM

I think I need to get you to make jigs for me, I don’t have enough time to build models let alone make jigs of this calibre. Well done on what you have created.

-- Peter New Zealand

View crowie's profile

crowie

1714 posts in 1558 days


#2 posted 03-12-2017 01:26 AM

Alex, You clever duck… another fancy jig, well done

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

View bruce317's profile

bruce317

300 posts in 430 days


#3 posted 03-12-2017 01:38 AM

Alex, Well thought out.

-- Bruce - Indiana

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2360 posts in 1596 days


#4 posted 03-12-2017 01:42 AM

Very nice and as always an enjoyable read.

View drbyte's profile

drbyte

747 posts in 3669 days


#5 posted 03-12-2017 03:17 AM

I made one about like this for general indexing purposes. Like the ball bearing idea. Nice job. What are T&J models?

-- Dennis, WV

View htl's profile

htl

2532 posts in 766 days


#6 posted 03-12-2017 03:20 AM

And! And!! And!!! They’re so pretty!!!!
Well done!

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

785 posts in 428 days


#7 posted 03-12-2017 04:58 AM


.... What are T&J models?

- drbyte


Thx drb’. I shouldn’t be spruiking the site as they don’t pay me (or even give me any freebies), but here is a link to T&J.
The ball bearing (if you can keep it… and the spring in place when changing index wheels) really simplify the operation.

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

785 posts in 428 days


#8 posted 03-12-2017 05:21 AM

For anyone already read and subscribed to the link, the springs specifications has been added at the end of the project post.

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2154 posts in 1776 days


#9 posted 03-12-2017 11:55 AM

Ducky I know you don’t like reading. So:

-- My englisch is bad but how is your dutch?

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

25375 posts in 2474 days


#10 posted 03-12-2017 01:40 PM

This is a very creative jig and you did a fine job on it. Nice work.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View bushmaster's profile

bushmaster

1910 posts in 1890 days


#11 posted 03-12-2017 02:53 PM

Studied your presentation and video to learn what you where talking about. Works great at a low cost, but the machines you used to make the parts and drill, most likely cost a fortune. Spend on one end and save on the other. It got me thinking though, I may need something like this some day.

-- Brian - Hazelton, British Columbia

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

17257 posts in 2796 days


#12 posted 03-12-2017 02:56 PM

Great read, sweet set up. Walk barefoot in shop you will surely step on lost spring or bearing. Might fall and hit your head but spring found. Lol It’s happen to me once or twice smile.,

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View htl's profile

htl

2532 posts in 766 days


#13 posted 03-12-2017 05:17 PM

Ken
Sounds like a song, I remember hearing about beer can tops or something. Stepped on a pop top————-blow out my flip flop ?
Now tell me if you don’t hum that the rest of the day. LOL

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

785 posts in 428 days


#14 posted 03-13-2017 12:02 AM



..., most likely cost a fortune…. I may need something like this some day.

- bushmaster


Thx bushie. However, you referring to the need for an extravagant drill press or the laser?

I always chuckle when I see a blog with ”Cheap xxx made from scraps.” in the title. The scraps were probably blotched pieces that may have initially cost a fortune (after all timber doesn’t grow on trees) in its unmachined state… Then consider the machinery and hand tools used. If you cap that off with the time taken and even if you cost that at sweatshop rates, the ”cheap” becomes a greater oxy than the ”moron” author of the article (no offence meant to past present and future authors).
The cost saving is in the pleasure you get out of making it and the entertainment it may provide to both friends and strangers.

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

785 posts in 428 days


#15 posted 03-13-2017 12:16 AM



Ken
Sounds like a song, I remember hearing about beer can tops or something. Stepped on a pop top————-blow out my flip flop ?
Now tell me if you don t hum that the rest of the day. LOL

- htl


Damn you #4... ”Stepped…hum… Got me going ”...top——- blow…more hum... all day ”...flip flop”... even more hum… and even in my sleep!

That’s why I insist the missus wear her high heeled thongs in my workshop. Stop her damaging the pop tops with her caluses.
Just to put your mind at ease… by high heeled thongs I’m not referring to stilettos with a G-string but platform slippers angled by a tin can.

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD

showing 1 through 15 of 16 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com