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Bedside Tables

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Project by anthm27 posted 03-11-2017 05:16 AM 727 views 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

These bedside tables took me three and a half months.
I cant say that I didn’t use any power tools but most was by hand tools and every piece of timber at some stage had a hand plane to it .
I don’t have any tabletop type woodworking machines so the power tools I used where hand held.

The design was my own and attached is a pic of my original drawing.

Getting good stock timber here in Hong Kong is difficult, I found nice 75×12 s (3’’x1/2”) so figured I could laminate them together nicely.

Firstly I built the tops using ply wood and simply laminating the 75×12s to the ply and a 40×12 border around it.

Then I made my side and back panels, once again gluing the 75×12 s to the ply.

The legs where of 125×25, I ran saw cuts to check out where the panels and bottom shelf where to be housed. did this prior to ripping the stock down then chiseled out by hand each housing.
I then glued the ripped two pieces to end up with the 90 degree profiled legs.
The legs where complex as I basically housed them out before ripping the stock to glue the pieces for the 90 degree profile.

I laminated the bottom shelves the same as the tops.
Drawer construction was from 12 mm ply wood, simple and strong.

My favorite parts is the drawer fronts which is from 3 pieces of wood laminated together. I left the end grain visible as a design feature so as it shows off the 12mm thickness of the other pieces used in the tops, panels and bottom shelves. There is of course a join in the center at the back of the drawer fronts.

It was then a matter of assembling the tables using all the prefabricated parts I had made. I managed to be able to screw most together from the inside so as no screws where visible.
The only wood filler that was used was a few nail holes from the tops and bottom shelve borders. I masked these up before filling.

The tables where sanded up by hand and coated with two coats of Tung Oil then waxed twice with carnauba wax.

Cheers Anthony





10 comments so far

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

106 posts in 831 days


#1 posted 03-11-2017 05:26 AM

Theses are some pics of the construction stages. The drawer fronts being laminated, the tops being finished with smoothing plan and the legs being housed out.
also the Faithfull and patient apprentice helping me with assembly

View woodworm's profile

woodworm

14408 posts in 3312 days


#2 posted 03-11-2017 07:17 AM

Beautiful….

-- masrol, kuala lumpur, MY.

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

4125 posts in 1926 days


#3 posted 03-11-2017 09:38 AM

Very Neato Anthony

The apprentice looks like somebody I could do with around the place, my wife loves my projects but hates the dust and mess!

-- Regards Robert

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

106 posts in 831 days


#4 posted 03-11-2017 09:46 AM

Thanks for the kind comments, and yes Robert the apprentice, she’s a good sport, Yours not from the philllipines then.

View david38's profile

david38

3518 posts in 2065 days


#5 posted 03-11-2017 03:58 PM

good looking

View tony77's profile

tony77

9 posts in 379 days


#6 posted 03-12-2017 12:01 PM

amazing very nice

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

106 posts in 831 days


#7 posted 03-12-2017 12:13 PM

Thanks Tony and Dave for kind comments.
It’s tough competition here on lumberjocks, so much talent, so I do appreciate the comments.
Kind Regards Anthony

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

106 posts in 831 days


#8 posted 03-12-2017 12:27 PM

Fortunately or unfortunately I don’t derive my income from woodworking, I’d be very interested in some comments from more experienced joiners about the method I used, ie building the components and then assembling the tables. Would a better approach have been to have assembled as I go type of thing?
Kind regards
Anthony

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

1393 posts in 1344 days


#9 posted 03-12-2017 09:28 PM

Very nice tables and I hate to admit that I learned a really neat trick from your pictures. It’s something I never thought of doing, that’s why I like this site so much. I can learn something every day, it’s just a matter of whether I implement those ideas.
But your inlay on the drawer fronts WILL be utilized here in Ohio – Thank you

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

106 posts in 831 days


#10 posted 03-15-2017 10:01 AM


Very nice tables and I hate to admit that I learned a really neat trick from your pictures. It s something I never thought of doing, that s why I like this site so much. I can learn something every day, it s just a matter of whether I implement those ideas.
But your inlay on the drawer fronts WILL be utilized here in Ohio – Thank you

- recycle1943

Thanks for the comment, yes originally I was going to run a border piece of wood around the drawer front similar to the bottom shelves and table tops. I decided showing off the thickness of the drawer front inlay and therefore the end grain a nicer idea. It also explains the thickness of timbers used in the shelf and table top laminations.
Thanks again
Antho

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