LumberJocks

A slab Gage for the Band saw log slicer/Resaw Jig

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Project by Bob #2 posted 10-15-2007 12:52 AM 13493 views 18 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Not long ago I reported on a method to re saw fairly large logs on the band saw.
The system works great with one exception:
It takes too long to orient the next cut.
To improve this situation I made yet another jig that I place the BS sled on and Line up.
bs-sledging

As you can see there is a vertical fence that can be adjusted from zero to about 4-1/2”
bs-sledjig3
I can now parallel the cut face to the fence , and quickly set the width of cut and keep the cut face parallel with the saw blade.
bs-sledjig4

This last shot shows a piece of wood slabbed off at 5/4 thickness . I will plane both sides now and split it again on the bandsaw to get to my final width of 1/2”.
bs-sledjig6

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner





14 comments so far

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4438 posts in 2685 days


#1 posted 10-15-2007 02:50 AM

Ok, Now I get it. It took me a minute to see it but, yes, it’s good one.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2759 days


#2 posted 10-15-2007 03:20 AM

Yeah, Tom…I blinked a bit there too, but now I get it. Bob doesn’t spoon feed us like Niki. He leaves a bit of it up to you to figure out. Nice!

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Dadoo's profile

Dadoo

1771 posts in 2713 days


#3 posted 10-15-2007 07:06 AM

Bob, I built a sled like this from an idea out of a woodworking magazine. Unfortunately, I can’t find that issue or remember the magazine title. But what the maker did was attach the log to the vertical fence (I did mine with screws) and then run it through the blade. The sled rides in the slot on the right side of the table.Your next cut will be of whatever thickness you choose just by moving the vertical fence (and log) to the left a bit. He was cutting boards down to 1/4” thick, I think.

My problem is an old cranky Craftsman bandsaw with a 3 1/2” cutting height and a 1/4” blade. (Hey, it was free and I’ve only invested into bearings so far). My blade keeps tracking thru the wood strangely as I need a wider one. I’ve given up on trying it (getting dangerous here) and sent the jig to the scrapbin. I am eyeballing a new, bigger bandsaw and will recreate this sled then. I’ll look thru my magazine pile again for you guys too. The sled did work…the saw did not!

-- Bob Vila would be so proud of you!

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2744 days


#4 posted 10-15-2007 04:47 PM

Dadoo, that is the first sled I made and used with some success with my 14” band saw.
If you look carefully at my new gage jig you will see the backer I used was from the older style jig.
The problem I found with the older style was that there was no way to keep the log co planar and most logs are tapered from end to end.
bandsaw sled
My new one relies on the just cut surface to determine the thickness of the cut instead of the saw blade to get the width. I was getting tapered cuts with the old one,
This one eliminates that.
In a real mill they cut the tapers off in the first operation then slice the cant into boards.
There is another portable mill that uses 2 saw blades.
One cuts sideways and the other cuts vertical to produce rift sawn lumber.

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2744 days


#5 posted 10-15-2007 05:07 PM

duplicate ???? sorry

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Dadoo's profile

Dadoo

1771 posts in 2713 days


#6 posted 10-15-2007 05:29 PM

OK I get it now. My jig was along the lines of yours in pic#4. There wasn’t support though for the left side of the log and it tended to relax, binding the blade. That and the fact that I was attempting this with inferior equipment. Thanks for clarifying this Bob.

-- Bob Vila would be so proud of you!

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2942 posts in 2717 days


#7 posted 10-15-2007 09:33 PM

Bob,

That is just really neat, that you can take a log and make your own lumber out of it! I hope to get into this some day…

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2744 days


#8 posted 10-15-2007 10:44 PM

Hi Tom,
I cut a few birch trees off my property a couple of years ago and blocked the logs into 4-5 foot lengths .
I have them piled in my back yard.
I set a couple of logs down on one end in the earth to “spalt” and give me some neat black lines where the wood rot just begins to break down the lignin in the wood.
That’s what I have been slicing up to get some patterned veneers and slats for box making and the llike.

Birch is pretty plain untill you let Ma nature paint it up a bit.
It seems like I have been making jigs for this project forever and never getting to the end where I can start making some boxes but I am gaining on it now.
I have recvently glean som elm and box elder that will met the same fate as the birch. <g>

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 2719 days


#9 posted 10-18-2007 07:42 AM

The elm and box elder should be interesting to open up! Great jig.

I’ve let some of my birch rot just a little too much!

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View Tony's profile

Tony

978 posts in 2753 days


#10 posted 10-28-2008 04:38 PM

Hi Bob

I just found this topic from you, I recently cut up some Birch on the bandsaw also – I was really surprised at what was inside, it should have been white, but the bugs and bacteria got in there – anyway, just thought I would share it with you

http://www.dewalt.com/Blogs/post/2008/10/Lumber-Cutting--Drying-(-4b).aspx

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2744 days


#11 posted 10-28-2008 04:49 PM

Yep, Tony don’t you just love that spalted wood!
It’s lilke discovering a treasure.
As you point out on your blog, you can’t buy anything this pretty.
I have a bunch horded for the doors on my shop cabinets.

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Tony's profile

Tony

978 posts in 2753 days


#12 posted 10-30-2008 12:30 AM

I never even thought about doing that for cabinet doors – what a great idea.

I am just starting to collect wood for next season’s cutting – Saturday I start to move 15×5m x 40cm Aspen logs – they were a steal at 120€ for the lot 9.5 m3, which should yield about 4.5m3 (1900bf) – no idea what to do with it all, maybe I should try spalting some of it?

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2744 days


#13 posted 10-30-2008 01:28 AM

Holy smoke Tony.
What a haul. Aspen can be so white that it reminds me of holly.
I trims and finishes like birch.
There is less sap than the other conifers.
I would split it with you but the freight become a question. (g)
Spalting could be interesting.

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2744 days


#14 posted 10-30-2008 01:30 AM

Dorje:
Where does the time go?
“I’ve let some of my birch rot just a little too much!”
Me too boo hoo!

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

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