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My first table

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Project by Rockytop posted 02-22-2017 03:02 AM 1097 views 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I’m curious as everyone’s thoughts & constructive criticism. Just please no rude comments. It’s my first table. There are some flaws but I’m quite proud of it. It’s from my barnwood. Maybe a little over my head with the tools I have, but I’m very interested in everyone’s thoughts as to what I could’ve done better.





14 comments so far

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

23509 posts in 1911 days


#1 posted 02-22-2017 03:10 AM

It looks fine from the pictures. The main thing is to be honest with yourself when criticizing your own work. Don’t be to hard on yourself, but things that you don’t like, figure out how to do it better.

Keep up the good work

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View Elevatedcarpentry91's profile

Elevatedcarpentry91

1 post in 35 days


#2 posted 02-22-2017 06:25 AM

When clamping together boards be sure to keep the connecting end crown opposit of the next in line. So crown up, crown down, crown up etc. but other that that it’s a very beautiful!

View Kelster58's profile

Kelster58

272 posts in 113 days


#3 posted 02-22-2017 10:45 AM

Looks GREAT. The important thing is to keep going and making more projects. You will get even better over time.

-- K. Stone “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” ― Benjamin Franklin

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

897 posts in 220 days


#4 posted 02-22-2017 11:30 AM



I’m curious as everyone’s thoughts & constructive criticism. Just please no rude comments. It’s my first table. There are some flaws but I’m quite proud of it. It’s from my barnwood. Maybe a little over my head with the tools I have, but I’m very interested in everyone’s thoughts as to what I could’ve done better.

- Rockytop

I for one think it’s awesome! Kudos, Rockytop. You wrote,”a little over my head with the tools I have”; may I assume just hand tools? May I also assume mortise and tenon joints at the apron and side stretchers? I love it; the weathered barn wood is beautiful … ya gotta love mother nature!

Please point out what you consider flaws, as I don’t see any. With that said, the only thing I would have done differently is add an “H” stretcher, considering the length of the table. Again, Good job!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View oldrivers's profile

oldrivers

968 posts in 1139 days


#5 posted 02-22-2017 11:55 AM

First run is always fun, the further we go the more we grow, congratulations you did well. Monte gave you excellent advice~ HEED it.

-- Soli Deo gloria!

View XrayJay's profile

XrayJay

197 posts in 1552 days


#6 posted 02-22-2017 12:10 PM

If I walked into someone’s house it would be the first thing I would appreciate. A lot of character!

-- Whatever you find to do with your hands, do it with all your might,... because there is no work in the grave...Ecclesiastes 9:10

View dannmarks's profile

dannmarks

217 posts in 154 days


#7 posted 02-22-2017 12:37 PM

I would have softened the corners and that would have made it look more family friendly. It is really nicely done. How did you fasten the top down? That could be important.

View Rockytop's profile

Rockytop

37 posts in 197 days


#8 posted 02-22-2017 02:14 PM


I’m curious as everyone’s thoughts & constructive criticism. Just please no rude comments. It’s my first table. There are some flaws but I’m quite proud of it. It’s from my barnwood. Maybe a little over my head with the tools I have, but I’m very interested in everyone’s thoughts as to what I could’ve done better.

- Rockytop

I for one think it s awesome! Kudos, Rockytop. You wrote,”a little over my head with the tools I have”; may I assume just hand tools? May I also assume mortise and tenon joints at the apron and side stretchers? I love it; the weathered barn wood is beautiful … ya gotta love mother nature!

Please point out what you consider flaws, as I don t see any. With that said, the only thing I would have done differently is add an “H” stretcher, considering the length of the table. Again, Good job!

- Ron Aylor


Ron Aylor, there is a little unevenness among the top. The posts are actually 2×4 that i planed, glued & clamped to make bigger. One actually cracked leaving a small gap on one corner of the top. One of the pics show that corner to be cupping up a little. I have a good planer(shopsmith pro planer) Hand jointed with a lot of measurements, circular saw & and good straight flat bar. Its not perfectly jointed but I was pretty pleased. Lumber may have been a little dry, all i have is a HF moisture meter 12$, probably not great but it showed 6%. I used pocket holes for all connections

View Rockytop's profile

Rockytop

37 posts in 197 days


#9 posted 02-22-2017 02:17 PM



I would have softened the corners and that would have made it look more family friendly. It is really nicely done. How did you fasten the top down? That could be important.

- dannmarks


Danmarks, I used pocket holes for all connections

View MadeinMT's profile

MadeinMT

212 posts in 1733 days


#10 posted 02-22-2017 02:33 PM

Pocket holes are easy and quick but the real fun is learning how to create better joinery, perhaps beginning with mortises and tenons, as they provide a much stronger joint. There are, of course alot of different ways to do M&T joinery. I prefer chisels and a good backsaw. I seem to get just as good results as using power tools and I love when my shop is nice and quiet while I work with hand tools.

Bottom line is you created a nice table. Now start exploring different techniques.

-- Ron, Montana

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

5689 posts in 1616 days


#11 posted 02-22-2017 02:44 PM

That’s a nice looking table. Only criticism I have is being hard on yourself. I would be proud for my first table. We all learn and grow as we go along. Keep up the good work.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View smitdog's profile

smitdog

255 posts in 1678 days


#12 posted 02-22-2017 03:10 PM

That wood certainly has a lot of character! I think it is very nice looking. The only concern I would have is that the legs won’t be very strong laterally in one direction because you only braced two of the sides at the bottom. In pic number 3, if you pushed on the “front” of the table the legs would rack and being pocket holes on a fairly thin apron it may not hold up. If it were me I’d add braces on the other two sides as well to give it more stability. Like others said already M&T joints are much stronger so the bracing wouldn’t matter as much with that kind of joint at the apron.

Great job and there’s nothing like learning through experience!

-- Jarrett - Mount Vernon, Ohio

View dannmarks's profile

dannmarks

217 posts in 154 days


#13 posted 02-22-2017 11:56 PM

If your wood is at 6 to 8 % it may not move much depending on where you live. Here is a picture of a desk top for a desk that I am making and when I started it was at 12% moisture content. So I put it in my office for the last 90 days to see what the stained but not coated with a finish product would do in an unrestrained state. It was very flat and straight when I brought it in my office. Do you see how it is slightly bowed or cupped along the edge. I took that picture on purpose to share with you. It is also about an 1/8 of an inch narrower than when I brought it my office. When I attach this I will use a sliding joint that does pull it down but allows the top to contract and expand depending on the season. Using this wood was a bit of an experiment as this wood was a live tree last summer. Over all it has done better than I expected.

Your table will serve you well. Any yahoo can buy a nice table. You made yours with your own hands.

And by the way I started all of this with a shop smith myself some 35 years ago.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

897 posts in 220 days


#14 posted 02-23-2017 12:15 AM

Ron Aylor, there is a little unevenness among the top. The posts are actually 2×4 that i planed, glued & clamped to make bigger. One actually cracked leaving a small gap on one corner of the top. One of the pics show that corner to be cupping up a little. I have a good planer(shopsmith pro planer) Hand jointed with a lot of measurements, circular saw & and good straight flat bar. Its not perfectly jointed but I was pretty pleased. Lumber may have been a little dry, all i have is a HF moisture meter 12$, probably not great but it showed 6%. I used pocket holes for all connections

- Rockytop

Rocktop – Thanks for the reply. Don’t be too hard on yourself! I still think it’s awesome. When you make another table … out of say … African Mahogany … then worry about a completely flat top! Try some mortise and tenon joints, and keep up the good work!

EDIT: Well look at that you made it to No. 1 right out of the chute!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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