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Ipe and Maple Smoothing Plane #2 with Norris (slow) Adjuster

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Project by cicerojoe posted 02-10-2017 03:02 AM 470 views 3 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This is the second maple and ipe plane that I built recently. This one is a little different in terms of the adjuster. It has a “slow” Norris type adjuster, which is kind of what it sounds like. It takes greater movement of the adjuster knob to change the depth of the blade. Maybe a quarter turn for a small adjustment and a half turn for a large adjustment. The adjuster also has a strong magnet in it to hold it in place. I suspect this was to increase the stability of lateral adjustment (Norris type adjusters control both depth and lateral adjustments). I have found the magnet to be a nice touch but did not have problems using the adjuster without the magnet. This has the PM-V11 blade which is the top end Veritas blade. I have since found out that the PM stands for Powdered Metal, which is a process for making high-tech tool-steel alloys. This explains why this plane is able to hold such a sharp edge. I made this plane a little bigger (10 inches) and set it up so that it can take fine or deep cuts to be an all around shop tool. I am thinking it can be used to dimension rough lumber, jointing, or for fine finishing work. I will post some video on youtube shortly.

-- John from the Cherry Valley Studio in NY http://www.cvalleystudio.com





6 comments so far

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

24847 posts in 2442 days


#1 posted 02-10-2017 04:23 PM

This plane is a real beauty. It’s a nice shop built tool that displays a lot of fine craftsmanship.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

2958 posts in 2760 days


#2 posted 02-10-2017 06:52 PM

I really like this plane. Was milling the ipe difficult? Did it glue okay?

-- Allen, Colorado (Instagram @bobasaurus_woodworking)

View cicerojoe's profile

cicerojoe

59 posts in 3021 days


#3 posted 02-10-2017 07:53 PM

Allen,

IPE planes well (with hand planes), and is not that difficult to work with in general. I don’t fully understand why, because it is like 3500 on the hardness scale. I think it is to do with its fibers and the wood grain. It will dull you blade a little quicker than domestic woods, but I think this is because of crystal-like (silica?) particles in the wood.

Ipe is oily. Here is what I did as far as gluing with PVA: 1. before gluing clean surface with rubbing alcohol (I have read some people use acetone, but I have not tried) 2. Use Titebond III 3. Glue and clamp as soon as the alcohol dries.

If not using Titebond III, use a good quality epoxy. I have also read CA glue works well on Ipe, but have not tried myself.

Thanks for the kind comments.

John

I made a video showing how I use the alcohol before glue up. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mfmt0KPpY_o&t=4s

-- John from the Cherry Valley Studio in NY http://www.cvalleystudio.com

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

2958 posts in 2760 days


#4 posted 02-10-2017 08:27 PM

Thanks John. I recently bought some West System G/Flex epoxy that’s supposed to work for oily woods. I might try it.

I have tried hand planing ipe before and it felt like planing a rock. Do you use normal 45 deg frog bevel-down planes for it? I did get it to work but it wasn’t easy.

-- Allen, Colorado (Instagram @bobasaurus_woodworking)

View cicerojoe's profile

cicerojoe

59 posts in 3021 days


#5 posted 02-10-2017 10:44 PM

The west system is the gold standard for tropical wood. I would still wipe it down with alcohol right before glue up.

Yeah, I just use a 45 degree angle plane. Just have to have it surgical sharp and then touch it up periodically. I will try to throw up a video on youtube.

-- John from the Cherry Valley Studio in NY http://www.cvalleystudio.com

View cicerojoe's profile

cicerojoe

59 posts in 3021 days


#6 posted 02-12-2017 01:40 AM

Allen
Below you’ll find a picture of the kind of shavings I get with IPE. I was smoothing the sides of the plane body you see in the photo. The biggest problem I have with the IPE is unexpected tear out. I think that even if there is no knot, that areas near what where knots were in the tree are affected. So it is really important to figure out the grain direction. And even then have some extra lumber, because these trouble spots just tend to explode wood fibers all at once in all directions.

-- John from the Cherry Valley Studio in NY http://www.cvalleystudio.com

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