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Some planes get back to life... 2

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Project by mafe posted 03-15-2010 06:01 PM 2704 views 0 times favorited 18 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Here are a skandinavian style Danish palne I just fixed.
It’s a model with adjustable mouth, wich are not normal on these, also the wedge are replased with a metal type lever cap for stability.
Again, I just did a light restore with a scraper, epoxy to fix the damage, and a sharpening of the blade.
Then a full oil up with Danish oil, and I must say, this might become my favorite, it glides like nothing else, and it’s so light compared to the metal planes.
And to those who don’t know, the Skandinavians use the planes for both pull and push, so the ‘horn’ comes in handy. (The French don’t have a ‘horn’ since they only push).

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.





18 comments so far

View Don Newton's profile

Don Newton

712 posts in 2364 days


#1 posted 03-15-2010 06:20 PM

A “plish” of the blade! That’s a new one on me. I assume that means a honing. Plish…..I’ll try and use it in a sentence today.
By the way, nice plane!

-- Don, Pittsburgh

View mafe's profile

mafe

9670 posts in 1835 days


#2 posted 03-16-2010 03:18 AM

Yes I see it looks stupid!
What I meant was a clean up of the blade, and then a honing.
I laugh, and admit my English are not top Dollar…
;-)

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Don Newton's profile

Don Newton

712 posts in 2364 days


#3 posted 03-16-2010 04:05 AM

Your English is fine considering I speak no Danish at all! Keep recycling those planes, the old ones are better than what you can buy new.

-- Don, Pittsburgh

View mancave's profile

mancave

114 posts in 1810 days


#4 posted 03-16-2010 04:53 AM

makes you wonder why they started making metal planes.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9670 posts in 1835 days


#5 posted 03-16-2010 10:31 AM

Yes!
I think it must be that you could adjust the blade more easy, and that they were better risistant in use, and also some kind of fashion within the woodworkers.
I think also you see how a lot of guys here are starting to make wooden planes, they seem to have the same feeling, that these wooden ones run more easy, and are not so heavy.
Me I like both, so I will use them after what I do, and what my mood says.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1861 days


#6 posted 03-16-2010 10:35 AM

hej mads
nice saved on that old Ulmia smoothing plane and the other metal planes
I wasn´t sure but can we get Danish oil here in Denmark and what´s the brand if so
or did you meen you used BLO or ?
I ám not sure the metal wedge is a replacement I have seen them
on different planes and today it´s the common way of doing it
here in skandinavia

ha´ en go´ dag

Dennis (Ærø)

View mafe's profile

mafe

9670 posts in 1835 days


#7 posted 03-16-2010 10:50 AM

Yes Danish oil are a brand, and you can get it in Denmark.
Here you can buy it in Denmark.
The metal cap are not a replacement it was born like this I’m sure, I think this happend as a production answer to the metal planes.
Go dag, retur,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1861 days


#8 posted 03-16-2010 10:54 AM

thank´s Mads
why didn´t I think on them
I have nown the busniss for years

Dennis

View stefang's profile

stefang

13623 posts in 2080 days


#9 posted 03-21-2010 01:26 PM

Mads this is a fine plane. I’ve never seen a wooden plane with an adjustable mouth before. I always thought Ulmia was a Swedish made plane. Here is a photo of a plane I made about 12 years ago. It is for doing the inside of staves to make a traditional stave bucket. It has a round bottom and I ground the blade round. It isn’t a great plane but it works pretty well for it’s intended use. I love having the horn on the front. Makes it real easy to use. I guess it would look better if I cut a little off the top.

Click to enlarge
Photobucket

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9670 posts in 1835 days


#10 posted 03-21-2010 01:49 PM

Hi Stefang,
I think acually Ulma are German, at least it’s a German registred trademark… It was only to explain that this is the type of plane that we use here in Denmark. We have a producer in Fyn, here in Denmark, making these traditional planes.
I’m impressed, I will have to make a plane once, even I think I should be able to handle most now, but perhaps for a special job one day…
I’m impressed also by your wooden hinge project, do you have some drawing or diy for this, that you could send me?

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View stefang's profile

stefang

13623 posts in 2080 days


#11 posted 03-21-2010 07:39 PM

I am 100% sure you will make a better one Mads. This one was made with no real knowledge of planes or woodworking.

The blog link below is a tutorial for making the hinge and installing it. If you go to my home page/blogs there are some blogs loosely related to the ones below and others too.

http://lumberjocks.com/stefang/blog/13300 Making the hinge

http://lumberjocks.com/stefang/blog/14407 Installing the hinge part 1

http://lumberjocks.com/stefang/blog/14407 Installing the hinge part 2 final

Let me know if you have any questions about these tutorials. I don’t know what tools you have available, but this work can be done with quite a range of hand tools and/or power tools. I did this hinge with a spokeshave, but you can make it with a lathe or a dowel maker or the little sanding jig shown that I used to make the other hinge. That’s on the link below;

http://lumberjocks.com/stefang/blog/14368 Making Dowels

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View docholladay's profile

docholladay

1287 posts in 1804 days


#12 posted 04-02-2010 02:19 AM

I love those old wooden planes too. I have a couple of Japanese style planes. I also have some Stanleys, but one of my favorite planes is an old German one that looks similar to the one you have there. Mine does not have an adjustable mouth, but it cuts very well. I think that wood sliding along wood leaves a smoother, more polished finish. Once you get used to adjusting a wooden plane, they aren’t difficult to manage at all.

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

View aurora's profile

aurora

206 posts in 1998 days


#13 posted 04-22-2010 09:52 PM

seems planes are “addictive”. they are beautifully simple. i’m sure your plane is wonderful to use as well as being an impressive piece of history.

i like doc above have a horn handled, non adjustable mouth wooden plane that was made by its original owner in the 1850’s as a part of his furniture maker/carpenter apprenticeship. has a rounded edge ground on its cutting iron, and cuts beautifully.

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6899 posts in 1897 days


#14 posted 09-16-2011 09:48 PM

Hey Mads,

I found this old post, nice plane. The adjustable mouth doesnt seem hard to make, I wonder why more planes dont have them.

there seem sto be two holes in the adjustable mouth, the one on top is obvious but how does the horizontal one work? is there a screw on the front of the plane to push the block back?

Thanks

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View mafe's profile

mafe

9670 posts in 1835 days


#15 posted 09-17-2011 12:50 AM

Mauricio yes I agree it seems not to hard.
There are only one from the top.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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