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My first carving of a bear.

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Project by atouchofoz posted 01-23-2017 04:52 PM 1008 views 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
My first carving of a bear.
My first carving of a bear. No picture No picture No picture No picture No picture
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I have never done any kind of carving before. So I don’t know what kind of carving it is called when it is flat like this. I just saw a picture I liked and tried to put it onto a piece of wood. I cut the outside image of the bear with the jug saw at an angle so it would catch as I pulled it forward, locking it so it doesn’t come all the way through. Then I did the detail of the bear.
I will eventually get the photography part of showing my wood working down, but for now I’ll say this is on a 10×12 3/4 inch think inch piece of pine. It is two pieces locked together as I pull the bear forward. Oh yes, it did take a long time.
I also learned a few things about my tools and how the wood dust can fly all over the kitchen adding to real fiber in my food!
I am rather excited about how it turned out though. Something better than designer firewood!
Now what to do with it? Anyone have an idea?
Thanks for the encouraging words! ~Suzanne

-- Suzanne, A Touch Of O.Z.





13 comments so far

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

2746 posts in 493 days


#1 posted 01-23-2017 05:01 PM

I simply love this piece of fine work ….still not quite sure just how you achieved this …but looks real good anyways …. GREAT JOB :<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View ClaudeF's profile

ClaudeF

484 posts in 1487 days


#2 posted 01-23-2017 05:25 PM

I would say it’s probably a form of relief carving, although it could even be a form of chip carving. Classic relief carving is usually rounded on all the “corners” and has different levels to create the illusion of distance. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relief_carving Chip carving can often be a geometric design made by cutting out chips of wood using 3 knife cuts to make a triangular chip. http://www.lsirish.com/tutorials/woodcarving-tutorials/woodcarving-projects/chip-carving/

You did a good job for a first attempt at carving! I’d suggest next time getting some basswood instead of pine, though. Pine has the hard/soft/hard/soft/etc. growth rings that make carving difficult; basswood has little discernible grain. Many wood carvers buy their basswood from http://www.heineckewood.com/ online – I’ve been buying from them for years. Other woods you can find at the DIY stores are poplar and birch. Both are a bit harder than basswood, but hold detail well and don’t have the grain problems that pine does.

Claude

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

View atouchofoz's profile

atouchofoz

131 posts in 839 days


#3 posted 01-23-2017 06:30 PM

Oh my gosh! Thank you GR8HUNTER for you kind words!!!

ClaudeF!
Thank you for posting the links and advice! You have saved me from having to do something domestic, I am going to check them out! I will look into Basswood for easier carving, as you mentioned.
I am getting antsy being cooped up this winter! So I just had to do SOMETHING ~on an impulse! Getting desperate to smell the wood and make something! I just might turn the laundry/mudroom into a mini work shop. Still cold out there though.
Thank you for replying!~Suzanne

-- Suzanne, A Touch Of O.Z.

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

10813 posts in 2648 days


#4 posted 01-23-2017 06:47 PM

I’m not carving expert but I think learning proces could be exciting as well as the finished project. More you carve, more future bears will look more alive and more 3D.
You could maybe put it as warning sign on your fence – it will kepp intruders out (HE, HE)

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View atouchofoz's profile

atouchofoz

131 posts in 839 days


#5 posted 01-23-2017 06:56 PM

Oh my gosh! Thank you GR8HUNTER for you kind words!!!

ClaudeF!
Thank you for posting the links and advice! You have saved me from having to do something domestic, I am going to check them out! I will look into Basswood for easier carving, as you mentioned.
I am getting antsy being cooped up this winter! So I just had to do SOMETHING ~on an impulse! Getting desperate to smell the wood and make something! I just might turn the laundry/mudroom into a mini work shop. Still cold out there though.
Thank you for replying!~Suzanne

-- Suzanne, A Touch Of O.Z.

View atouchofoz's profile

atouchofoz

131 posts in 839 days


#6 posted 01-23-2017 07:02 PM

Majuvla! Good idea on the front gate! A warning for Bears! Bears around here don’t read though. Could make for a fun conversation when visitors drive up to the house. At least I can be showing of some of my efforts! Maybe test out some wood sealer also. Good idea Majuvla!
THANKS!~Suzanne

-- Suzanne, A Touch Of O.Z.

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3148 days


#7 posted 01-23-2017 07:29 PM

Suzanne, you “bearly” mastered scroll sawing and now you’re carving! You Rock young lady!

View atouchofoz's profile

atouchofoz

131 posts in 839 days


#8 posted 01-23-2017 07:48 PM

Hey Papadan! You’re funny!
I can’t move the scroll saw machine inside the house. I think it weighs at lease two hundred pounds! It is cast iron (It might as well weigh a thousand pounds at my age!) But I can do some other messy stuff with a hand held power tool! I just need to, well want to, smell the wood, and make something. You know how it is, we artist people, have to go make something or we go, as my mom used to say, “Nutsy-coo-coo”! HA! HA! HA!
Thanks for the smile Papadan!~Suzanne

-- Suzanne, A Touch Of O.Z.

View Druid's profile

Druid

1611 posts in 2575 days


#9 posted 01-23-2017 08:16 PM

Great start Suzanne, and wedging the bear forward is a good way to lower the background and get a thicker carving from a board. What you are doing is relief carving, and is typically a scene or object that is carved into the face side of a flat piece of wood. Another aspect that you might want to consider on future carvings (where you use the same scrollsaw technique) is that while the pieces are apart, you have the opportunity to apply any stain to each piece and avoid the possibility of it bleeding into areas where you don’t want it. One example could be a brown bear with a white snow scene as the background.

Good work, and I’m looking forward to seeing your next carving.

-- John, British Columbia, Canada

View atouchofoz's profile

atouchofoz

131 posts in 839 days


#10 posted 01-23-2017 08:33 PM

Ohhh Druid!
I like the idea of a brown bear in an early winter snow!!! Since I haven’t done any painting on this piece, maybe that will be what it becomes? Great idea!
It amazes me how some wood projects can take on a life of its own, sometimes never getting a seal of approval for being finished. And sometimes, I just never know when to call it quits! (Kindling anyone?)
~Thank you for replying~Suzanne

-- Suzanne, A Touch Of O.Z.

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

3506 posts in 2046 days


#11 posted 01-23-2017 10:38 PM

Very well done.

-- SAWDUST is THERAPY without a couch! just rjR

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

28195 posts in 2647 days


#12 posted 01-23-2017 11:15 PM

You did a nice job.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View atouchofoz's profile

atouchofoz

131 posts in 839 days


#13 posted 01-23-2017 11:28 PM

Thank you ralbuck!
It is nice of you to acknowledge the effort. You do some nice work yourself!~Suzanne

Thank you helluvawreck!
I hope you’re working on a big therapeutic project!~Suzanne

-- Suzanne, A Touch Of O.Z.

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