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Pretzel Iron Box •

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Project by tyvekboy posted 01-14-2017 11:05 PM 1331 views 3 times favorited 27 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Pretzel Iron Box •
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Jan 14, 2017

Now doesn’t that look delicious? No, it’s NOT wood. It’s a corn starch based treat that’s made with a cast iron cooking tool. I call them chinese pretzels. You can’t just eat one.

Now that I now have a collection of these cast-iron molds and handles I need a better way of storing them instead of the cardboard boxes they came in so I designed a box in which to store and transport them.

The sides and ends were made with some scraps of walnut veneer plywood. A piece of 1/2 inch thick solid walnut was glued to the top edges to hide the plywood edges. The rest of the wood was 1/4 inch plywood.

The corners of the box were mitered. A 1/4 inch rabbet 3/8 inch deep was cut on the bottom edges of all sides of the box. On 3 sides of the box a 1/4 inch dado 3/8 inch deep was placed on the top inside edges of the sides and one end of the box sides for the sliding top.

A piece of solid walnut with mitered ends was glued on one end of the sliding top.

Nine dividers were made from 1/4” plywood and glued into carefully spaced and cut slots in the bottom with a scroll saw. The dividers were rough cut on the bandsaw and then put in stacks of 3 using double sided carpet tape. I used a template stuck to each stack and a pattern bit to make them all identical.

Each divider was glued to the front and back ends that formed the compartments that would hold the cast-iron molds.

The box was glued together and then the bottom assembly was glued into the bottom rabbet. A split wooden handle screwed to a polished piece of 1/2 inch wide piece of metal formed the handle which was screwed to the side of the box with #14 X 3/4 inch pan head screws.

The removable handles and cast iron molds fit perfectly in the box. Some of the irons were not the Griswold brand and they did not fit in the compartments so they had to be stored around the perimeter of the compartments.

The top sliding cover was decorated with scroll saw cut pieces of 1/8 inch thick solid oak that were traced from the cast-iron molds. Each piece was rounded over and glued to the top.

On the inside of the cover I used spray adhesive to attach the Chinese Pretzel recipe . To help protect the recipe I used clear packing tape over the recipe.

The box with the cast iron molds and handles weigh 6.5 pounds so the metal handle was the best option instead of a wood based handle which I was contemplating. I also think it looks better with the metal.

The handle was made so that it could be folded to take up less space.

Thanks for looking.

Comments and favorites welcomed and appreciated.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized





27 comments so far

View jbee's profile

jbee

56 posts in 412 days


#1 posted 01-14-2017 11:29 PM

Looks delicious!

Nice box to store the utensils!

-- Life is good! Make the most of it.

View feldjager's profile

feldjager

31 posts in 230 days


#2 posted 01-14-2017 11:37 PM

Real nice looking work. One day I will be able to turn great looking pieces out. Im leaning new woodworking stuff everyday.

-- "Never Quit, Never Surrender" Feldjager

View MrLaughingbrook's profile

MrLaughingbrook

111 posts in 1684 days


#3 posted 01-14-2017 11:47 PM

Your last two posts are great. I need and will build the potting station and and organizer fro cookie templates.

-- MrLaughingbrook

View Schwieb's profile

Schwieb

1831 posts in 3178 days


#4 posted 01-15-2017 12:00 AM

I’ll be looking forward to trying this out when you come to visit me in Florida. Nice work Alex.

-- Dr. Ken, Florida - Durch harte arbeit werden Träume wahr.

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

1649 posts in 2730 days


#5 posted 01-15-2017 12:02 AM

Ken – When I come to visit you in Florida you’ll have to remind me to bring you some

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

View TravisH's profile

TravisH

529 posts in 1651 days


#6 posted 01-15-2017 12:57 AM

Very nice and a project I will have to remember. It really brings home some childhood memories as we always had rosettes (struva) at Christmas. It was one of the traditions my Great Grandparents kept after leaving Norway. Never used a cornstarch recipe however.

View BobWemm's profile

BobWemm

2235 posts in 1642 days


#7 posted 01-15-2017 01:52 AM

Great looking box Alex,
Very well constructed.

Bob

-- Bob, Western Australia, The Sun came up this morning, what a great start to the day. Now it's up to me to make it even better. I've cut this piece of wood 4 times and it's still too damn short.

View bushmaster's profile

bushmaster

2180 posts in 1999 days


#8 posted 01-15-2017 01:59 AM

Your projects are always so professionally planned and executed.

-- Brian - Hazelton, British Columbia

View Joe Lyddon's profile (online now)

Joe Lyddon

9840 posts in 3769 days


#9 posted 01-15-2017 02:22 AM

Those look SO GOOD!!

In looking at the “molds”, I cannot see how you would get what your pictures look like… Are the molds hollow on the other side pictured? I take it that you squeeze the batter into the mold… if not, what?

How do you COOK them? Oven? Deep fry? or what? Do you have to COOK one, then refill the mold to cook more? If so, it might take a long time to cook enough for a dinner for two… yes?

Can you give me a little guidance? I’d like to try it…

Your project is very nice…

What brand of molds do you have that are NOT Griswolds? Which ones do you like the best?

Thank you!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Lenny's profile

Lenny

1561 posts in 3243 days


#10 posted 01-15-2017 02:44 AM

Well designed and well executed!

-- On the eighth day God was back in His woodworking shop! Lenny, East Providence, RI

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

1649 posts in 2730 days


#11 posted 01-15-2017 02:53 AM

That’s the word I was looking for … ROSETTES. Those are rosette irons.

This is the way you would use them with this corn starch based recipe.

Mix up the batter to about the consistency of latex paint … not too thick but not too runny.

Use an electric skillet with about 1/2 to 1 inch of peanut oil heated to 450 degrees.

Put the irons in the oil to heat up.

When the irons are really hot, take them out of the oil and lower it into the batter till the batter almost reaches the top. You don’t want the batter to go over the top. Leave the iron in the batter for about 5 seconds and take it out and put it in the oil. If everything is right, the batter should start to cook on the iron and you can gently shake it up and down till the pretzel (rosette) falls off into the oil.

Wait till it gets a golden brown and flip it over. We use chop sticks to flip them. You could also use the rosette iron too flip them over.

When it’s done remove the pretzel from the oil and place on paper towels that are laid over newspaper.

When the pan is full of pretzels, leave the iron in the oil so that it says hot.

Continue to cooking till all the batter is gone. You should end up with about 120 pretzels from one batch of the recipe … if you’re lucky enough and haven’t been eating them as you cook them … lol
———————————————-
If you are lucky enough to have a rosette iron set or get one on eBay and want to try this recipe, send me a PM with your email and I’ll send you the recipe.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

10589 posts in 2584 days


#12 posted 01-15-2017 01:35 PM

Extraordinary box for those cooking accessories. Too bad only sence of eye can enjoy here not taste.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View jbschutz's profile

jbschutz

521 posts in 2408 days


#13 posted 01-15-2017 01:37 PM

At my house, these are called Rosette Irons. They probably are found in many cultures, but mine are distinctly Norse.
I have my Mom’s set of three irons and make a batch or two every Christmas. The batter is a thin egg, flour, milk mixture ….much like crepe batter. After dipping the preheated iron into the batter, they are deep fried and then dipped into sugar.

-- jbschutz www.johnschutz.com

View Gittyup's profile

Gittyup

114 posts in 1673 days


#14 posted 01-15-2017 02:02 PM

Would that be like fancy funnel cake?


At my house, these are called Rosette Irons. They probably are found in many cultures, but mine are distinctly Norse.
I have my Mom s set of three irons and make a batch or two every Christmas. The batter is a thin egg, flour, milk mixture ….much like crepe batter. After dipping the preheated iron into the batter, they are deep fried and then dipped into sugar.

- jbschutz


-- tel

View david38's profile

david38

3518 posts in 2060 days


#15 posted 01-15-2017 03:21 PM

nice looking box

showing 1 through 15 of 27 comments

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