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Desk for Grand Child

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Project by dannmarks posted 01-03-2017 02:06 AM 619 views 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

OK Woodworkers – here is the deal. I have air dried this Red Oak for not such a long time and therefore I am taking a chance on how this desk top is going to behave. This desk is for a youngster. It will be made strong so that he can stand on it if need be. It may have even two or three goofy kids sitting on this at times. I plan on putting the top on using threaded inserts in the top under neath and bolt thru on slotted runners so that if there is shrinkage the top will just shrink and the attachments/Bolts with washers will slide in the slots. That said, I have some very open knots that I would like to fill before the final top coats. I will probably stain the desk a golden Oak.

My thoughts were to stain it, put a rinse coat on it to seal it and then get some sort of filler to work into the knots. I have read of people taking the sanding dust and mixing it with glue or top coat and just working it into the knot cracks and so forth. Does anyone have thoughts on this or other ideas? Has anyone done something and it turned out great or terrible and would like to share that knowledge? Making mistakes is not the end of the world, but doing it smart the first time seems like the way to go if possible.





6 comments so far

View alholstein's profile

alholstein

216 posts in 3878 days


#1 posted 01-03-2017 02:41 AM

Filling knots and staining is tricky. My suggestion would be to fill the knots with the sanding sawdust and then give it a good sanding to get rid of the extra glue before staining. But if there is extra glue on the wood it won’t stain well. You can wet the wood with either water or paint thinner to see how the wood will react to the stain before you use it. So if it is spotty do some more sanding. That is one approach.
Trying to fill it after staining still has some of the same problems. I don’t know how well the glue will bond after the staining.
Just my two cents. Others will surely have other suggestions. Epoxy and crazy glue are a couple of other options. But use the water or thinner trick to see how it is going to react to the finish that you settle on.
Al

-- Al Holstein "I wood do it"

View alholstein's profile

alholstein

216 posts in 3878 days


#2 posted 01-03-2017 02:44 AM



Filling knots and staining is tricky. My suggestion would be to fill the knots with the sanding sawdust and then give it a good sanding to get rid of the extra glue before staining. But if there is extra glue on the wood it won t stain well. You can wet the wood with either water or paint thinner to see how the wood will react to the stain before you use it. So if it is spotty do some more sanding. That is one approach.
Trying to fill it after staining still has some of the same problems. I don t know how well the glue will bond after the staining.
Just my two cents. Others will surely have other suggestions. Epoxy and crazy glue are a couple of other options. But use the water or thinner trick to see how it is going to react to the finish that you settle on.
Al

- alholstein


-- Al Holstein "I wood do it"

View TObenhuber's profile

TObenhuber

156 posts in 1429 days


#3 posted 01-09-2017 04:32 PM

I’ve done both methods mentioned.

I have filled cracks and knots with glue and then rubbed saw dust into them plenty of times. I consider this my general go to. Be sure to wipe as much of the glue off with the saw dust as possible and then sand thoroughly. Otherwise the glue will be visible when you are staining. This is a tip I have learned after several projects. You can see glue squeeze out on my early projects and much less in my later ones.

As far as Epoxy. I have used this as well but I just don’t like messing with epoxy. It stinks but it does leave the knot with a cleaner look. Just be sure to use a heat gun or torch to get rid of the bubbles. I prefer it to dry crystal clear.

Try both on some scrap or the bottom to see what you think. In the end its for your grand kids not going in an antique museum. Imagine it with markers and crayons on top of your chosen finish.

-- Travis, Virginia, www.facebook.com/CreativeWoodworksHybla

View dannmarks's profile

dannmarks

384 posts in 418 days


#4 posted 01-09-2017 10:48 PM

TObenhube – I have decided in this case to leave it as is actually because I was excited to see it with stain on it. It looks nice as is. However, I have a lot of this wood and will use your advise on the next project. It has been to cold to do much in the wood shop of late.

Thinking of this desk in actual usage has been fun. I will use lag bolts that will be hidden in the legs even though I will use traditional joinery putting it together. Why would I do this; well I am sure it will be stood on to get stuff off the top shelf some where sometime. He is 13 now, but I can see him sitting on it with a few friends having a couple beers in college. I want it steel pinned so that it will be almost unbreakable at the main joint connecting it to the top. This is a great kid, but he lacks common sense – like most youthful people do. I want it to last long enough that he will re-finish it someday actually. Thank you for your input. I will use your methods soon on the next project.

View Deersplitter's profile

Deersplitter

28 posts in 321 days


#5 posted 01-29-2017 02:01 PM

I am sure you are already finished with this project. But what I like to do is use clear epoxy to fill knots like these. I work with a lot of mesquite wood and knots like this, or worse, are common. The epoxy fills the void and is totally millable. So, when you sand and finish the piece, the cracks are filled but you can see right into them. It looks really great.

-- Shawn, Houston Texas

View dannmarks's profile

dannmarks

384 posts in 418 days


#6 posted 01-29-2017 07:26 PM

Shawn, Houston Texas,

Actually I am not finished with it at all I have brought the top into our home into my office to let it acclimate for a month or so. I do have the legs cut for it and should have those inside as well. But I do not – maybe I will go get them yet tonight and bring them in. This wood has not been properly dried so I am being slow and careful. Any ways I think I will use your epoxy solution after all. Just seems like the best way to go as I want the “defects” to be part of the character. Thank You Shawn.

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