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Bentwood Rings

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Project by FrankLad posted 03-02-2010 03:24 AM 7994 views 20 times favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Here are some recent rings, done in the bentwood style.

1: Ziricote ring (wide) with thin offset crushed turquoise inlay
2: Osage Orange
3: Maple with wide centered Ziricote inlay
4: Beech
5: Ziricote with Grey Maple lining
6: Lignum Vitae with Bethlehem Olive lining (matte finish)

-- Frank, Mississippi, Handcrafted wooden rings - http://www.bentwoodrings.com





20 comments so far

View flowchart_jockey's profile

flowchart_jockey

37 posts in 1820 days


#1 posted 03-02-2010 03:42 AM

These are beautiful. I especially love the turquoise inlay. You call them “bentwood,” does that mean these are a bent strip? how do you join the ends?

-- Why make it easy when you can make it difficult?

View JasonWagner's profile

JasonWagner

523 posts in 1924 days


#2 posted 03-02-2010 03:48 AM

Frank…I really like that Ziricote ring. Is that a size 7 and how much for shipping?! Seriously, really nice work on these. Your fast f-stop makes for a cool effect but it’d be nice to see just a little more of the ring. I too am curious on how you made these.

*Edit- I just found your site and have answered my own questions!

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!

View Chelios's profile

Chelios

567 posts in 1810 days


#3 posted 03-02-2010 03:54 AM

Your rings are really a work of art. How does one make these? It would be a great topic for a tutorial.

best

View flowchart_jockey's profile

flowchart_jockey

37 posts in 1820 days


#4 posted 03-02-2010 03:56 AM

I just found your blog, so my questions are answered also. Thanks for sharing these!

-- Why make it easy when you can make it difficult?

View FrankLad's profile

FrankLad

270 posts in 2053 days


#5 posted 03-02-2010 04:02 AM

Thanks so much guys!

JasonWagner: I actually use a macro adapter (basically a spacer between the camera body and lens) to get in really close to the ring, which gives that really shallow depth-of-field.

-- Frank, Mississippi, Handcrafted wooden rings - http://www.bentwoodrings.com

View Chelios's profile

Chelios

567 posts in 1810 days


#6 posted 03-02-2010 04:06 AM

Just realized this is your business so I would understand that my (our) requests for how do you make them may not be adressed. In any case your pieces are beautiful. All the best

View JasonWagner's profile

JasonWagner

523 posts in 1924 days


#7 posted 03-02-2010 04:19 AM

Frank – I also did not realize you had the business set up. I like the pictures for the web site, I was just being selfish in wanting to see all that detail! I just came back from my basement to look at some bloodwood I have left over to make a ring like you initially described on one of your project posts (non bentwood). Thanks for sharing the information. I really do think these rings are great.

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!

View Junji's profile

Junji

698 posts in 2126 days


#8 posted 03-02-2010 04:21 AM

Again you did great job! I also like the 1st one with turquoise inlay. Someday I want to try the bent wood ring too.

-- Junji Sugita from Japan, http://tetra.blog12.fc2.com/

View bigike's profile

bigike

4034 posts in 2032 days


#9 posted 03-02-2010 04:30 AM

very nice work, how do u join them together with no seams?

-- Ike, Big Daddies Woodshop, http://www.icombadaniels@yahoo.com

View FrankLad's profile

FrankLad

270 posts in 2053 days


#10 posted 03-02-2010 05:03 AM

Junji: As always, thanks for the kind words! Be sure to let me know how it turns out if you try it!

Chelios and JasonWagner: No worries! I’ve actually talked about the technique on some of the other Project postings. I’m not too secretive about it, really. The main thing is to cut the wood really thin and soak or steam it until pliable. Thickness varies depending on species… some types of wood “want” a thin strip before they’ll bend well. Average is typically just over 1/2 mm. The wood has to be bent around a form (supported on inside) that closely matches the ring size.

Some tougher woods bend easier when a heavy cloth (or similar material) strap is used to support the outer fibers from breaking outward. (Granted, I’ve really only had to use that trick on Bocote.)

bigike: Thanks! I do my best to hide the seams basically by how I cut/taper the ends, and then sand/smooth them out to make things blend together. In some species, it’s pretty tough to spot the seam. It’s a bit more noticeable n lighter or more plain woods.

-- Frank, Mississippi, Handcrafted wooden rings - http://www.bentwoodrings.com

View Maveric777's profile

Maveric777

2691 posts in 1820 days


#11 posted 03-02-2010 05:05 AM

Outstanding work…

-- Dan ~ Texarkana, Tx.

View FrankLad's profile

FrankLad

270 posts in 2053 days


#12 posted 03-02-2010 05:07 AM

Thank you, Dan!

-- Frank, Mississippi, Handcrafted wooden rings - http://www.bentwoodrings.com

View donjoe's profile

donjoe

1360 posts in 1775 days


#13 posted 03-02-2010 05:41 AM

Beautiful work. Very nice.

-- Donnie-- listen to the wood.

View WistysWoodWorkingWonders's profile

WistysWoodWorkingWonders

11917 posts in 1901 days


#14 posted 03-02-2010 05:59 AM

great work on these rings… thanks for describing the process… something I would like to try in the future…

-- New Project = New Tool... it's just the way it is, don't fight it... :)

View Skylark53's profile

Skylark53

2565 posts in 1804 days


#15 posted 03-02-2010 07:36 AM

beautiful work.

-- Rick, Tennessee, John 3:16

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