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DIY Gripper Pusher Simplified

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Project by CrazyRussianWoodShop posted 12-24-2016 01:07 AM 4326 views 11 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Hi folks,

My latest jig I made. It is fairly simple to make and works very effectively…

Here is an instructional video (3.5 min): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=De51MrQxHso

Be Safe and Happy Woodworking!

Michael

-- Michael Makarevich (CrazyRussianWoodShop): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYNOkVS7B5_6A3GgNq7TtrQ





15 comments so far

View scott0317's profile

scott0317

58 posts in 1121 days


#1 posted 12-24-2016 01:27 AM

really slick. thanks for sharing and the video is great. Had no Idea “plexiglass” could be bent like that.

-- I've almost got all the tools I need, almost.

View CrazyRussianWoodShop's profile

CrazyRussianWoodShop

157 posts in 311 days


#2 posted 12-24-2016 01:53 AM



really slick. thanks for sharing and the video is great. Had no Idea “plexiglass” could be bent like that.

- scott0317


Thanks, Scott. O yes, I made a bunch of parts for my other jigs (you can see some on my youtube channel). Plexiglass is an awesome material for jigs: Light, strong and easily manipulated with the regular wood tools/cutting bits…

-- Michael Makarevich (CrazyRussianWoodShop): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYNOkVS7B5_6A3GgNq7TtrQ

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2506 posts in 1654 days


#3 posted 12-24-2016 02:34 AM

Another great build and video.

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

3076 posts in 2074 days


#4 posted 12-24-2016 04:30 AM

Great tip on bending plexiglass. Going to be looking for where I can apply this as I am still on a theme of making jigs for the shop.

Thanks for posting!!!

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

10393 posts in 2533 days


#5 posted 12-24-2016 08:21 AM

Great work, I like that simple version, I might make it once.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View CrazyRussianWoodShop's profile

CrazyRussianWoodShop

157 posts in 311 days


#6 posted 12-24-2016 01:39 PM



Great work, I like that simple version, I might make it once.

- majuvla


Thanks, Ivan! Yes, the eccentric balancing wheel surprised even me, I mean I came up with the simple alternative to the balancing plate but didn’t expect it to be so convenient and to be so quick to adjust…

-- Michael Makarevich (CrazyRussianWoodShop): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYNOkVS7B5_6A3GgNq7TtrQ

View htl's profile

htl

2651 posts in 825 days


#7 posted 12-24-2016 06:07 PM

I built one but was much to heavy for most of my model building this project would work much better being so much lighter. +1
The handle looks like it would feel much better for me and my painful wrists.
What thickness of plastic are you using?

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View Beniboose's profile

Beniboose

3 posts in 184 days


#8 posted 12-24-2016 07:48 PM

I don’t want to rain on your parade, but this GRR-Ripper contraption is pretty much useless and dangerous. First of all, the middle leg was designed to move sideways in order to create a tunnel so the blade can pass inside, while both legs will hold the offcut and the keeper piece. The original GRR-Ripper can be configured to safely rip stock anywhere between 1/8” (with special leg) to 4” wide. Wider than that and you can use the GRR-Ripper as a regular push block. More over, the GRR-Ripper is designed to ride against the fence, and it fact, you must do that in order to increase safety. Otherwise, it can get very dangerous, depending on the conditions, to push your stock forward, downward and towards the fence. The balance support being a round part is interesting, but I wouldn’t trust the friction of the screw/nut to keep it solid in place. What happens if it drops?

I’m sorry once again, but this is a dangerous jig I would not recommend to make. I think the design just shows that the designer doesn’t understand what is really happening and why the GRR-Ripper was designed that way. I don’t mean to be rude, but we are dealing with a jig riding on a tablesaw that can zip through fingers in no time, not a scrollsaw that will scratch your skin. Make this jig at your own risk!

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1775 posts in 1849 days


#9 posted 12-24-2016 08:02 PM

Just curious, Beniboose. You signed up specifically to post this response. Do you have any connection with the GRR-Ripper?

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View Beniboose's profile

Beniboose

3 posts in 184 days


#10 posted 12-24-2016 08:21 PM

Good question Shampeon,

I know the inventor and I use to be a distributor in Canada between 2004-2008 for the Microjig products, including the GRR-Ripper, but aside from that, I have no direct connection with the manufacturer since then. I just happen to know the product very well (just as well as the inventor hiimself), and since we’re dealing with tablesaws, and trust me, I’ve seen my fair share of customers with mangled hands and fingers, I would strongly recommend to not make this jig. There’s no turning back once a blade bites you… It happens in a split second, but can take years of recovery and medical attention.

This is the main reason why I’ve signed up, to inform people here of the potential danger of this jig. I don’t care about the business side of this, I have no interest in it anyway.

Once again, that balance support made out of an eccentric circle is a very dangerous design element. The legs don’t slide sideways, so it will force you to use this jig away from the fence, once again, very dangerous once all the conditions are present. I would hate to see someone here lose a few fingers because of this jig.

If you don’t want to spend the money for the GRR-Ripper, that’s perfectly fine. Make yourself a thick push pad with some rubbery product underneath, raise the blade 1/8” above your stock, and cut it. You will eventually ruin your push pad, but it will be much safer that way.

View htl's profile

htl

2651 posts in 825 days


#11 posted 12-24-2016 08:55 PM

Shampeon I was thinking the same thing, then went to see if he made any other comments and he did whats above.
Beniboose I’m glad you added your second comment cause I like CrazyRussianWoodShop project and will probable make one but will put a little more thought into the round leg support idea thanks to you.
Adding a spring and pin to it will get the job done or adding some sand paper so it won’t slip, will make it a little safer.

I will add that I love the GRR-Ripper product and would love to have one but $50+ now they’re even more it won’t be in my shop when I can build my own push sticks for nothing but my time.

I love making jigs and such so a super fancy push stick is a fun project.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View Beniboose's profile

Beniboose

3 posts in 184 days


#12 posted 12-24-2016 09:18 PM

htl,

I don’t think adding a spring, a pin, or some sandpaper will help… Don’t forget what happens when downward pressure is applied to the round balance support? Depending on which side it happens, it will either try to screw, or unscrew the nut. This is where it’s completely flawed. The only way to make this safer is to have an up/down movement. The only way to counteract this force is to screw the nut very tight, but many older folks don’t have enough strength in their fingers, hence the very dangerous situation once they will push downward too hard…

Take a look at the original balance support of the GRR-Ripper, and you will see what I mean, it has 2 vertical slots, and is almost the full length of the GRR-Ripper. Aside from that, the above jig design just doesn’t work at all anyway.

Heck, make yourself this push block (http://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/editors-blog/favorite-table-saw-push-stick), it will be much better and safer. While it won’t help to push your stock against the fence like the GRR-Ripper does, at least it’s a proven design, and it will work. If you have a riving knife properly installed, it will be very safe to use.

View htl's profile

htl

2651 posts in 825 days


#13 posted 12-25-2016 06:02 PM

This brought up another point that could be addressed.
If you really need the stabilizing on the side of your jig it really could be to big for what your doing so I’m thinking of making a thinner one for my model work, would be safer and much handier for my needs.

The GRR-Ripper was made to try and cover all or most needs but for us diy types having one of more than one size would be a great way to get er done, and would be safer and handier for sure.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View Rick M's profile (online now)

Rick M

9602 posts in 2046 days


#14 posted 12-26-2016 07:54 AM


Do you have any connection with the GRR-Ripper?

- shampeon

Doesn’t matter does it? Doesn’t make him right or wrong.

I admit to being a little skeptical of the eccentric wheel support. It’s clever, but I know it can be difficult to tighten things like that enough to support much pressure and I tend to put a lot of pressure on my push sticks.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

6052 posts in 3033 days


#15 posted 12-27-2016 12:20 AM

Evolution to a simpler tool!
Nice job Michael!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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