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Walnut Roof Rack with inlaid Aluminum

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Project by Choke posted 12-22-2016 02:57 AM 1155 views 1 time favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Ok to anyone that reads this, I have gone Old School, Wood Rack meets new school design and function.

The picture on my truck is a test fit as to were the rack will sit.

It’s made from Solid Walnut with Aluminum inlay, the 1/8th inch strips are all raised 1/8th inch even along the top of the side bows.

-- Winning the Hearts and Minds one measurement at a time





17 comments so far

View FJ_Hutch's profile

FJ_Hutch

1 post in 216 days


#1 posted 12-22-2016 03:30 AM

Looks good, but for dry places right?

-- FJ

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

3136 posts in 2104 days


#2 posted 12-22-2016 03:54 AM

Looks good.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View ArtMann's profile (online now)

ArtMann

453 posts in 511 days


#3 posted 12-22-2016 04:29 AM

I can tell you what will happen to an epoxy coating. It will degenerate and come off in a few months.It can’t take UV light. That is just an inherent disadvantage of the material. You need to obtain some high quality (and expensive) spar varnish from a marine supply store. Do not buy the Minwax crap from a big box store. It won’t last any longer than the epoxy. I know this from unhappy experience.

View Choke's profile

Choke

97 posts in 576 days


#4 posted 12-22-2016 11:03 AM

FZ, It will be wet and Dry.

-- Winning the Hearts and Minds one measurement at a time

View Choke's profile

Choke

97 posts in 576 days


#5 posted 12-22-2016 11:04 AM

Wood Butcher thank you

-- Winning the Hearts and Minds one measurement at a time

View Choke's profile

Choke

97 posts in 576 days


#6 posted 12-22-2016 11:09 AM

ArtMann Totally understand. That is why I’m asking before I do anything. I have read to do the epoxy sealer, then the Varnish. I live in Boat land near the Atlantic ocean of NC, so I’m sure I’ll find the right answer. My Neighbor is the CAD Designer for the Shearline Boat company and he has started to ask also. I was even thinking of the PPG auto Paint companies “Flex’d and Flat” bumper Clear coat. Since it will stay on the truck.

-- Winning the Hearts and Minds one measurement at a time

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

1379 posts in 1317 days


#7 posted 12-22-2016 12:55 PM

I would think that an automotive clear coat over a laquer sanding sealer would hold up as well as anything. If the aluminum is removeable, take it out, seal, clear coat then reinstall aluminum.
Check with local auto body shop for the thinnest clear coat – ppg might be it – plus the clear coat will take a beating (somewhat)
all of the above is jmho

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View Revrand1's profile

Revrand1

42 posts in 2232 days


#8 posted 12-22-2016 01:40 PM

Looks great! WaterLox marine spar varnish! I would do the first two coats at 50/50 with mineral spirits for a penetrating seal coat and then the successive coats at full spar varnish…I don’t think anything will ultimately last forever depending on the elements, but I used the waterlox on a butcher block bathroom vanity top and LOVE how it looks and has held up.

View pottz's profile

pottz

1705 posts in 680 days


#9 posted 12-22-2016 03:05 PM

man i gotta say thats the nicest truck rack ive seen.as far as a finish id use a good quality oil finish made for decks like penofin,youll have to recoat about once a year though but its gonna get dinged up and scratched and the oil will be easy to reapply when needed.great job.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View jbay's profile

jbay

1502 posts in 594 days


#10 posted 12-22-2016 03:11 PM

Nice rack Choke. (can’t believe I’m saying that to a guy) lol

I’m out west in the heat and not much lasts out here so I don’t have any advise for you.
Maybe try to get something that you can recoat without having to strip it. That’s all I got.
Nice work!

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View BareFeet's profile

BareFeet

37 posts in 2228 days


#11 posted 12-22-2016 03:53 PM

Look at what most wooden canoe builders do…they use epoxy to seal the wood, and then a spar varnish on top of it (light sanding of the epoxy before your 2-3 coats of varnish). For the epoxy I’d use either West Systems or Total Boat epoxy system. The best spar varnish I’ve seen used is Epifanes.

You did great work on the rack! I really like the aluminum contrast against the walnut!

View Grumpymike's profile

Grumpymike

2096 posts in 2010 days


#12 posted 12-22-2016 10:07 PM

I built a raised planter and a garden bench a few years ago and finished with a Minwax product called ‘Helmsman Spar Urethane’ over BLO. I used a good looking Cedar on the face so that it wouldn’t look quite so redneck … That thing has been out in the weather fror three years and it is just now looking like it could use a recoat. ... Look for the green label.

ArtMann can cuss Minwax products all he wants to, but this product has worked well for me and protected from sun, rain and irrigation moisture for three Years …

You have received lots of good suggestions and I would be curious to know which product you chose for your beautiful rack.

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

View Choke's profile

Choke

97 posts in 576 days


#13 posted 12-23-2016 01:45 AM

Thank you everyone very much for the input. grumpymike I think Jbay and POTZ have the answer I’m going to go with.

STARBRITE has a heavy UV protectant Teak Oil. It soaked into that Walnut real nice, I just put some on a piece earlier today and tonight soaked it in water. Seems to be pretty good. easy to recoat. the aluminum is all epoxied in place and not removable.

-- Winning the Hearts and Minds one measurement at a time

View Grumpymike's profile

Grumpymike

2096 posts in 2010 days


#14 posted 12-23-2016 05:33 PM

Sounds like a good choice to me … a deep penetration of oil is a better choice than a top coat that will chip and scratch.

I just looked at StarBrite … I have never used this product, but if it is all that the web site says, it should be a winner.

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

View Cajunrotor's profile

Cajunrotor

35 posts in 2023 days


#15 posted 12-23-2016 11:35 PM

“I have read to do the epoxy sealer, then the Varnish”

That’s exactly what I use on my boat’s teak to get the best durability. The epoxy by itself doesn’t have the UV resistant qualities that you want, but it does an excellent job of sealing the teak against water intrusion. That’s really important around mating edges where the varnish will break down fast if moisture gets past it into the wood. It’s a LOT more work than just using an oil, but the oil will require much more frequent applications and tends to get really dark whereas the marine varnish over epoxy will maintain that crisp, bright look that we like on the boat. Having said that, even the best of epoxy/varnish jobs will require a varnish freshening from time to time. Just how often will depend on its exposure to the local elements.

-- Earl

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