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Remington 660 & 600 Magnum Laminated rifle stock

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Project by HalDougherty posted 02-19-2010 11:15 PM 14983 views 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I just finished a custom stock for a Remington 660. (It would also fit a Model 600 Remington 350 Magnum.) The original rifle was made in the early 1960’s when laminated stocks were new and radical. The magnum model of both the 600 and 660 was available in 350 Remington Magnum and 6.5 Remington Magnum. The recoil was fierce and the laminated stock was used to keep the weight down while increasing strength. This first stock is made from English walnut, rock maple and a center section of black walnut. I’ve included a photo of some of the prototype stocks I carved to see what different combinations of woods looked like. I made one test stock using English Walnut and Bartlett Pear, one with black walnut and rock maple, and black walnut and cherry. The original stock is shown in the 5th & 6th photo.

-- Hal, Tennessee http://www.first285.com





8 comments so far

View Hacksaw007's profile

Hacksaw007

593 posts in 1841 days


#1 posted 02-20-2010 12:41 AM

Outstanding work again. Makes a gun stock maker humble to see your work. Love the walnut laminated wood.

-- For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. John 3:16

View JBoss's profile

JBoss

37 posts in 1700 days


#2 posted 02-20-2010 12:53 AM

As far as thinning the stock for cosmetic reasons, I would recommend paying more attention to how it feels in your hand than how it looks. Does it feel bulky in that area? If so then thin it out, just not to thin of course. Otherwise, I would leave it as is.

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1489 posts in 2413 days


#3 posted 02-20-2010 01:25 AM

I like your work. These 660’s have attracted a small but determined number of collectors. The 350 Rem Mag is an especially useful hunting cartridge.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

View HalDougherty's profile

HalDougherty

1820 posts in 1889 days


#4 posted 02-20-2010 02:41 AM

At 6.5 lbs, the Remington 660 is about the same size and weight as an AR-15. Only a lot more power per shot… The 350 Magnum cartridge has the same powder capacity as the 35 Whelen. (30-06 necked up to .35) The recoil from full power loads is about the same as shooting a shotgun. it won’t be fun to test on the shooting bench, but it should be fine for hunting. I just hope grizzly’s get plentiful enough in East Tennessee to be classed as a varmint!

-- Hal, Tennessee http://www.first285.com

View Hallmark's profile

Hallmark

432 posts in 1758 days


#5 posted 02-20-2010 08:56 AM

All of your stocks look great. What’s the process? Also, just wondering if the original stock was bad or you just wanted to improve upon it.

-- Style is simple, but not my execution of it.

View HalDougherty's profile

HalDougherty

1820 posts in 1889 days


#6 posted 02-20-2010 04:17 PM

I start with logs from a tree trimming service. Saw them into 4/4 lumber, so I can dry them in a reasonable time, Then, when I’m ready to glue up each blank, I resaw them to close to final thickness and sand them to remove the resaw marks and make them perfectly flat. Then I use an 80 ton hydraulic press that I designed and built to glue up the blank. Next I use a stock duplicating machine from Dakota Arms to rough out the stock. http://lumberjocks.com/projects/19137 Last but not least is a long sanding session to remove the router marks. Most of the stocks I carve are sold in unfinished condition to gunsmiths. Both these stocks were for a customer who wanted finished custom stocks for his two Model 660 rifles. I have to finish sand both stocks and over several days, wet polish with tung oil to 600 grit. Then glass bed both stocks. I’d pillar bed them also, but the 350 Magnum has so much recoil that going for the best bench rest accuracy is a silly quest. I’m going to use one of the prototype stocks I carved on my rifle to keep the original stock in the condition it is now. When I bang through the brush next deer season, I won’t scratch or ding the original stock. I made all 5 of the stocks as close to the original as I could. I only changed the wood species and wood selection to make better looking stocks than the original.

-- Hal, Tennessee http://www.first285.com

View Nails's profile

Nails

8 posts in 1830 days


#7 posted 02-21-2010 07:55 PM

Your work caught my eye as they are almost identical to the Rem M600’s. My dad owns the laminated 350 Mag M600 Remington and I own the M600 Remington in .308 caliber. I have refinished my M600 with Tung oil, and it turned out great. Nice to see work being done on these rifles Hal.

View boogieman63's profile

boogieman63

1 post in 655 days


#8 posted 12-01-2012 03:30 AM

Hi, I have been looking for a stock for my Remington 600 350 mag, I am interested in purchasing one. Can you call me at 770-778-0478? Thanks, KC

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