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Wine rack

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Project by flipflop posted 02-14-2010 03:28 PM 2219 views 3 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This is a wine rack that I built a few months ago. Built out of oak all dowel construction. I finished it with old english stain and a satin spray poly. It will hold 100lbs on it, I tested it to make sure it would not come crashing down with $200.00 of wine on it. Total cost $70.00. I think it came out great.





12 comments so far

View thelt's profile

thelt

665 posts in 3432 days


#1 posted 02-14-2010 03:41 PM

I like it. Do the bottles go in with the stopper next to the wall or the other way around? I’m asking because I am going to do one like that too.

-- When asked what I did to make life worthwhile in my lifetime....I can respond with a great deal of pride and satisfaction, "I served a career in the United States Navy."

View Chase's profile

Chase

448 posts in 3079 days


#2 posted 02-14-2010 04:55 PM

Great start! Now lets see, i think you could probably fit about 6 of those things on the wall. So at 70 bucks each, and 200 dollars of wine…. OK so lets skip the math for not and just consider it a worthy undertaking. Keep up the good work and post pictures of the inevitable wall of wine!

-Chase

-- Every neighborhood has an eccentric neighbor. I wondered for years "who was ours?" Then I realized it was me.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117160 posts in 3630 days


#3 posted 02-14-2010 06:39 PM

Good wine rack.

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos wood crafting & woodworking classes

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2608 posts in 3103 days


#4 posted 02-14-2010 07:19 PM

This is a great wine rack to hold one case of wine! I could probably sell something like this in the wine shop I work at.

And since it holds a case, you shouldn’t have any problems with weight, as an average bottle of wine weighs 2.5 to 3-pounds, so a case of wine only weighs about 33-pounds. Even a case of sparkling wine weighs 45ish-pounds, so as long as it’s securely on the wall, the shelf won’t ever be anywhere near its limits.

Speaking of it not falling off the wall, how are you securing it?

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View jockmike2's profile

jockmike2

10635 posts in 4299 days


#5 posted 02-14-2010 07:55 PM

Very nice job. Nice big rack, must be to hold a case.

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

View flipflop's profile

flipflop

37 posts in 3466 days


#6 posted 02-14-2010 09:09 PM

The corks go out away from the wall but still stay wet when layed at that angle.

The rack is secured by 3, 3”x3/8” lag bolts 16” on center into the studs.

View WoodyWoodWrecker's profile

WoodyWoodWrecker

171 posts in 3304 days


#7 posted 02-15-2010 12:38 AM

Nice rack but I have a question about the placement. I know nothing about wine because I don’t drink it, so I may be way off base. I thought wine needed to be stored in a cool place. It looks like you put your rack next to the ceiling. Doesn’t it get warmer that high, especially in the winter? If I’m wrong, feel free to tell me so.

-- You always have tomorrow to stop procrastinating.

View donjoe's profile

donjoe

1360 posts in 3084 days


#8 posted 02-15-2010 05:54 AM

Great looking wine rack.

-- Donnie-- listen to the wood.

View Dean10's profile

Dean10

61 posts in 3083 days


#9 posted 02-15-2010 06:08 AM

Along with woody’s comment, and im not familiar with wine that much either, but isnt sunlight bad for it too? I thought the best place for wine was a cellar or basement? I have no doubt about how good you crafted this though if it can sit on the wall full and not come crashing down :)

-- "May you live in interesting times"

View flipflop's profile

flipflop

37 posts in 3466 days


#10 posted 02-15-2010 01:56 PM

Sun light is bad, but we drink a bottle with dinner most every night which is only 4 glasses total so is goes fast. I do have plans to make some sort of cool wine storage cask in the future.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2608 posts in 3103 days


#11 posted 02-15-2010 05:42 PM

Ultimately, wine likes to be kept in a dark place (away from direct sunlight), and at a relatively stable temperature (don’t set it next to a radiator or heat duct, for instance). Most people will say that less than 60-degrees F is ideal. It is the temperature swings that really need to be avoided though. In my opinion, it would be better to store it at 70-degrees, if that temperature was stable, than fluctuating between 60-80 degrees. Just my opinion. You do definitely want to keep wine on it’s side for longer term storage, or you run the risk of the cork drying out. If you plan on drinking the wine within a month or two of purchase, don’t bother laying it down.

If Matty is drinking a bottle fairly often, that wine is only going to be sitting on that shelf for less than a month anyway. So, as long as it’s not really hot there, and the sun isn’t drenching it all day long, he should be OK.

I’ll be curious what you devise in the future, maybe on a bit larger scale!

Once we start finishing our open basement, I’m planning on incorporating some sort of wine storage down there. Right now we’ve just got it all in boxes down in a dark corner on the cement floor (in a dark place, at a fairly stable temperature).

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View flipflop's profile

flipflop

37 posts in 3466 days


#12 posted 02-15-2010 07:52 PM

The light does not come in directly on the rack it shines on the oposing wall. My house never reaches over 75f even in the summer and never under 65f.

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