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Spill Plane

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Project by Ron Aylor posted 11-27-2016 09:49 PM 1516 views 7 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Spill Plane
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Inspired by Mads' recent purchase , and history nugget: ”... a device which creates long, spiraling wood shavings or tapers which are used to move fire from one place to another … most common in the era before matches … unique in that ordinarily wood planes are used to shape a piece of wood, whereas with a spill plane the shaving is the product,” I decided to build my very own spill plane!
 

 
Using an old coffin plane iron as a guide I laid out a 12° angled mortise of sorts at 55° across the face of a 10/4 billet of sycamore. Having dropped the billet several times and sending it across the shop once, I had to stop and make some needed repairs …
 

 
... a big crack …
 

 
... and a busted corner!
 

I then covered the floor of the angled mortise with a piece of curly satinwood veneer just to make sure things were nice and even.
 

 

The escarpment was, by far, the most challenging part of the plane as there can be no gap under the bevel of the iron or the spills will not curl properly. (The plane pictured here is actually my third attempt. The pine and oak versions were a disaster, BUT, I learned a lot.)
 

 

After adding cherry and persimmon fences, I finished the entire plane with boiled linseed oil and bees-wax. Now it’s time to make some spills …
 

 
Please consider adding this project to your favorites … thanks!
 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.





13 comments so far

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

1664 posts in 2769 days


#1 posted 11-27-2016 09:55 PM

Very cool.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

View mafe's profile

mafe

11583 posts in 2845 days


#2 posted 11-28-2016 12:09 AM

How wonderful!
I love the story you tell also about learning by doing and making all the repairs visible.
My fiancée came today with a big smile on her face with a spill in her hand as she lid the candles and said: ‘can you smell how wonderful it smells’.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

3255 posts in 2940 days


#3 posted 11-28-2016 03:56 AM

I like it. What is that wedge set into? Doesn’t look like anything is there.

-- Allen, Colorado (Instagram @bobasaurus_woodworking)

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

4776 posts in 2021 days


#4 posted 11-28-2016 06:48 AM

What an ingenious idea. Well done!

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1536 posts in 403 days


#5 posted 11-28-2016 11:21 AM



How wonderful!
I love the story you tell also about learning by doing and making all the repairs visible.
My fiancée came today with a big smile on her face with a spill in her hand as she lid the candles and said: can you smell how wonderful it smells .
Best thoughts,
Mads

- mafe

Thanks, Mads! My wife made a similar comment saying, “the house smells like Colonial Williamsburg.”

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1536 posts in 403 days


#6 posted 11-28-2016 11:46 AM


Very cool.

- tyvekboy


What an ingenious idea. Well done!

- BurlyBob


I like it. What is that wedge set into? Doesn t look like anything is there.

- bobasaurus

Thanks, guys!

Bobasaurus – Thanks for asking … the wedge is held firmly in place by the thin persimmon fence, alone. If the iron is positioned incorrectly (too much higher than the bed of the plane) the wedge and iron will be knocked out! This actually helps to insure proper placement of the iron!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

27800 posts in 2622 days


#7 posted 11-28-2016 01:52 PM

This is a wonderful shop made tool. This is really nice. Congratulations.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1536 posts in 403 days


#8 posted 11-28-2016 02:31 PM

Thanks, Charles! This was a lot of fun … I now have spills all over the shop!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1536 posts in 403 days


#9 posted 11-28-2016 05:17 PM



Very cool.

- tyvekboy

Thanks!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1536 posts in 403 days


#10 posted 11-28-2016 05:18 PM



What an ingenious idea. Well done!

- BurlyBob

Thanks, Bob!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Ub1chris's profile

Ub1chris

109 posts in 1136 days


#11 posted 11-28-2016 08:58 PM

I may have to try this before fire season next summer.

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

3304 posts in 2165 days


#12 posted 11-29-2016 03:50 AM

Very interesting piece, excellent work!!

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1536 posts in 403 days


#13 posted 12-13-2016 03:40 PM



Very interesting piece, excellent work!!

- woodbutcherbynight

Thanks!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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