LumberJocks

My first live edge table top

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Project by BuckeyeMetz posted 11-25-2016 04:25 PM 431 views 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Maple with some birds eye and maybe some spalting. I’m very new to this and am soaking up all the knowledge I’m finding here. I’ve got it flattened, edges created and sanded to 120. Next up is epoxy filling of defects.. Sanded to 220. Waterlox original sealer.





10 comments so far

View whistlingwoodies's profile

whistlingwoodies

13 posts in 482 days


#1 posted 11-25-2016 07:12 PM

I do not understand why so many people put the narrow side up when making live edge things. Does anyone have an explanation that I have missed? I find using the wide side up gives you a wider flat surface and often a lot more heartwood exposure.

View Dwain's profile

Dwain

377 posts in 3320 days


#2 posted 11-25-2016 11:40 PM

I agree with the post above. That being said, the light shines better on the natural edge in this position. That allows better views of the unique live edge. It’s not always about the square footage.

-- When you earnestly believe you can compensate for a lack of skill by doubling your efforts, there is no end to what you CAN'T do

View WistysWoodWorkingWonders's profile

WistysWoodWorkingWonders

12664 posts in 2618 days


#3 posted 11-26-2016 03:53 AM

Hmmm, impressive piece of wood (so far) look forward to seeing the finished product, the start is great!
I would have to agree with Dwain that having the light shine off the edges adds some depth and detail to the live edge, whereas it would otherwise be in the shade if placed with the wide side up.
Regardless, it becomes the decision of the one making the project who has the best insight.

-- New Project = New Tool... it's just the way it is, don't fight it... :)

View BuckeyeMetz's profile

BuckeyeMetz

4 posts in 12 days


#4 posted 11-26-2016 01:34 PM

Interesting thought whistling woodie. But having the bigger side up would hide/minimize the beauty of the live edge. I freely admit to not knowing what I’m doing so I appreciate any and all criticisms.

I’m not only new at this type of woodworking, I’m new at posting projects. I will continue to update as i progress.

View david38's profile

david38

2514 posts in 1805 days


#5 posted 11-26-2016 03:16 PM

beautiful wood

View pottz's profile

pottz

900 posts in 445 days


#6 posted 11-26-2016 10:07 PM

nice start buckeye that slab will look nice when finished,dont forget to repost when done,and as far as wide side up or down its personal preference.nice job,welcome to lumber jocks.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View bushmaster's profile

bushmaster

1349 posts in 1744 days


#7 posted 11-27-2016 01:21 AM

Nice, will make a fantastic table.

-- Brian - Hazelton, British Columbia

View shakespeare's profile

shakespeare

14 posts in 1416 days


#8 posted 11-28-2016 07:05 PM

Without doubt or hesitation: wide side down. It highlights the beauty of the live edge, which is the main point of using it, and gives a better sense of board thickness. I will even go out on a limb and say that satin, maybe semi gloss finish is the way to go, as the glare from a high gloss finish distracts from the unique grain patterns, but that is just MHO, and sure to spark dissent and discussion.
That top is going to absolutely pop, when it’s finished. What kind of leg are you planning to put under it?

View BuckeyeMetz's profile

BuckeyeMetz

4 posts in 12 days


#9 posted 11-29-2016 11:59 PM


......I will even go out on a limb and say that satin, maybe semi gloss finish is the way to go, as the glare from a high gloss finish distracts from the unique grain patterns, but that is just MHO, and sure to spark dissent and discussion.
That top is going to absolutely pop, when it s finished. What kind of leg are you planning to put under it?

- shakespeare

Thank you for your comment. When I was still dreaming about this, I was favoring a high gloss finish. Epoxy. Now that I’ve seen lots of projects, I’m backing off a bit and agree that a satin finish will compliment the wood much better.

Currently, I have epoxied defects and bug holes. Adding some turquoise as an experiment. Here is what I’m thinking now.
1. Blotching tx with Charles Neil’s anti blotch
2. My scrap test looks terrible with stain so I’m skipping this step
3. I want to learn to work with shellac (french polishing looks fun) but I also have Waterlox and the scrap piece looks good with it.

Obviously, I don’t know what I’m doing lol.

And don’t even bring up legs. That’s what I’m falling asleep to every night. I hate haripins. Prefab look to industrial/modern/tech to me. I love contrasts so I’m considering mahogany which will give me a chance to learn how to do joinery. But I really have no idea what to do about legs. I’m kicking myself for not getting some purplewood boards at the woodshop that I got the maple slab.

I’m posting this for the criticisms, recommendations, guidance from those much more talented than me.

View BuckeyeMetz's profile

BuckeyeMetz

4 posts in 12 days


#10 posted 12-03-2016 04:33 AM

Update:

I’ve learned several things. I think.
1) I guess you can’t update the actual project album? So new pics posted below.
2) I had no intention of staining. My goal was to highlight the natural coloring
3) Blotching seems to be more a concern when your are staining/dyeing. And my test piece ( the great thing about a table top is that there is a table bottom. And the perfect test piece. confirms that that blotch control interferes with subsequent finishing. Im going with Waterlox. And my first coats tonite look great.
4) Crap, as great as the Waterlox looks already, I now see the residual scratches/gouges. Hopefully the wood will be beautiful enough to cover up my lesson.
5) I plan on doing 3-6 coats of Waterlox original, sanding after 3,4,5. One coat of the high gloss. And we’ll see what happens
6) This is my first time working with wood like this. Good lord, that wood is thirsty. I put a coat on after supper and there were areas that 30 seconds later looked as if I hadn’t touched it. I ended up putting on 3 light coats with a little pressure both with and across the grain. My test area already had a “hard” smooth surface like I thought epoxy could only achieve. I can already get a feel how this type of finish is going to work out.
7) I still don’t know what the hell to do about legs. Rough estimate 30”Wx21”deep. It’s going in my gf’s office and she doesn’t want a drawer. Which I want to do anyways to develop my joinery skills. I bought some mahogoney because I thought a darker wood would contrast nicely with the top. Now that I’m finishing, I’m now thinking a lighter wood would be nice.

Please critique and advise.
Pics:
-First/second/thirdish coat
-frome above. It’s a lost darker than I expected but this is the first time I’m truly seeing the grain. And I love it. Such a mish mash of colors. I appreciate the symmetrical, pure grain, mirror of the elite artisans. But this top is a Jackson Pollack.
-Angle shot to show how thirsty parts of the wood are. There are other parts that are so satiny smooth and exactly what I was looking for. At some point this thirst will resolve right? Do I keep applying coats till the entire piece appears equal in saturation?

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