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Kleenex box cover - walnut & hickory

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Project by BB1 posted 11-23-2016 06:59 PM 400 views 5 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Made this for a friend who gave me some walnut (tree from his farm). The sides are hickory and then used walnut for the corners and top. The top was from one board that I cut into strips to allow me to make the opening by gluing back the pieces (with a center section removed of course). Ends up looking as if I figured out how to make a center opening in a solid piece (which i did not!). Routered the edge so the top fit into the base with a snug fit. Intended to use GF High Performance but grabbed a can of GF Exterior 450 by mistake. Oh well, looks fine and should be extra durable!





13 comments so far

View observer100's profile

observer100

251 posts in 570 days


#1 posted 11-23-2016 07:16 PM

Nice looking project.

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

9097 posts in 2328 days


#2 posted 11-24-2016 09:45 AM

Nice work, beautiful clean straight lines.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

826 posts in 682 days


#3 posted 11-24-2016 02:57 PM

Nice subtle contrast, great way to simplify the corner assembly then dress it up!

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23122 posts in 2327 days


#4 posted 11-24-2016 06:30 PM

This is a good looking tissue box cover.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View dalepage's profile

dalepage

130 posts in 301 days


#5 posted 11-25-2016 12:04 AM

Very clean work, BB1. I’ve been doing the same thing lately, using claro walnut and bird’s eye maple gun stock rejects I bought by the pallet. Beveled on table saw. Walnut is darker than photo.

View BB1's profile

BB1

482 posts in 308 days


#6 posted 11-25-2016 02:12 AM

Very nice. How did you join your corners – did you attach the sides directly to the walnut or is the walnut over the joint (I did the latter). Also – how did you make the circle opening on the top?

Very clean work, BB1. I ve been doing the same thing lately, using claro walnut and bird s eye maple gun stock rejects I bought by the pallet. Beveled on table saw. Walnut is darker than photo.

- dalepage


View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

21556 posts in 3311 days


#7 posted 11-27-2016 12:28 AM

Great design Bill.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View dalepage's profile

dalepage

130 posts in 301 days


#8 posted 11-28-2016 10:15 PM

BB1, the box sides are joined by first gluing two corners to opposing sides. By putting the good side (outside) down on a table, I have less to sand to flush up the corner posts and panels. Then I glue the remaining two opposing sides to form the box. Take care here to have the ends of the panels all flush. They should have been batch cut and be exactly the same size.

Thickness for sides and corners seems to be best around 3/8 to 1/2 inch. Much thicker makes for a bigger, heavier box which isn’t in keeping with a small box of kleenex for the dressing table.

Note: I have been putting the grain vertical on the panels. This allows me to glue edge grain to edge grain and negate the need for any splines on the corners if they were mitered. I am width limited because I am using really nice wood, rejects from gun stock blanks. They don’t have the width without the corners. This was my fix and it works very well.

Be sure to sand the interior faces of the panels before you glue up, and watch out for glue squeezing out into the interior where you can’t clean it up. If you do, you can use a chisel to clean it up while the glue’s still rubbery.

Now that I have a box with an open top and bottom, I sand the top end dead flat in order that the top has zero gaps. I do that by hand sanding the box on adhesive sandpaper on a work table. I test it by clamping the top on tightly and putting a small light in the box. Any gaps are obvious. The more care you take in construction, the less sanding you’ll have to do to get a dead, sold flat surface to receive the top.

Your top can really make a difference with grain pattern, burl, contrasting color, and wood species. I tend to keep all scraps of very nice wood. Book matched grain looks good here, for example.

Now I glue on the top. I start out with four clamps at the midpoint on each of the sides, followed by four clamps on the corners. When that’s dry, I use my router table to flush cut the overhanging top back to the sides. Find the center of the top and cut the hole with a Forstner bit. If you’re slow enough, you won’t splinter out the inside and it won’t show any way.

The bevels are all done on the table saw. Watch out trying to make too wide a bevel. You might end up cutting the top away from the sides. The one pictured has all 45-degree bevels, but I did one that has a 15-degree bevel on the top of the sides, with no corner bevel. Again, don’t go into the sides too much. Cut that bevel on the TS with the top against the saw table.

When that’s all done, I go back to my adhesive sandpaper (120 grit) and sand all four sides and the top. I ease the sharp edge of the opening on the top with adhesive paper wrapped around a scrap length of stair rail. Then I use 120 grit on my 6-inch Festool Rotex sander. (Can’t say enough about how great a tool this is.) Follow that with 220 grit. I use Watco Oil with a top coat of sprayed lacquer to finish it.

Granddaughters, wives, daughters, and lady friends will love them. The smile on their faces is worth the work.

View BB1's profile

BB1

482 posts in 308 days


#9 posted 11-28-2016 11:19 PM

dalepage – thanks for the details on your method. I was working with thin material for my sides so the top is actually sitting down inside the box (just kept eating away with a straight bit in my router table until it would just pop in place – glued for the final step). I appreciate all the insights to add to my woodworking mental list of “how can I do that.” This was my third one and each was a unique construction so far. Fun to make and, as you noted, well received as gifts.

View dalepage's profile

dalepage

130 posts in 301 days


#10 posted 11-29-2016 09:16 PM

BB1, Here’s the box with 15-degree champhers on the top edges. The woods are quilted maple and walnut.

View BB1's profile

BB1

482 posts in 308 days


#11 posted 11-30-2016 02:26 AM

Very nice – I like the contrast of maple and walnut.


BB1, Here s the box with 15-degree champhers on the top edges. The woods are quilted maple and walnut.!

- dalepage


View dalepage's profile

dalepage

130 posts in 301 days


#12 posted 11-30-2016 02:51 PM

I’ve been using light walnut Watco stain on most of the boxes. It enriches the maple and if used on cherry, makes a warm, red-brown. The light walnut on padauk is really nice.

View BB1's profile

BB1

482 posts in 308 days


#13 posted 12-01-2016 11:41 AM

I haven’t stained any of mine – just used some water based finish (as I’ve been doing that inside the house and the water based has basically no smell)

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