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Greene & Greene clock with Motawi ceramic tile

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Project by DaleMaley posted 10-24-2016 12:58 PM 882 views 9 times favorited 18 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I ran across this 2010 plan for building a Greene & Greene style clock with a Motawi ceramic tile insert. It looked pretty neat, so I built one.

The Motawi tile was $75. I think this is a little pricey, but they do look pretty neat.

I usually use real ebony on my projects, but I decided to give the black magic marker method a try. I think it turned out pretty nice, as you can see from the pictures.

I used white oak for everything on this clock. I used a Teak stain with 3 rounds of 220 grit and polyurethane.

It took me a few minutes to develop a process for cutting the small black insert pieces from 3/8×3/8” stock. I was getting blow-out on the 3rd rotation of the cut using the dado blade, so I sawed the 1st dado, then Exacto knive scored the next 3 saw cuts before I made them. This method worked great.

You can still order plans for making this clock. See my woodworking web site for where to order plans, and see all of my Trials & Tribulations of making this clock.

Thanks

-- Dale, Illinois, http://dalemaley.webs.com/





18 comments so far

View david38's profile

david38

2509 posts in 1804 days


#1 posted 10-24-2016 01:51 PM

very nice

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

826 posts in 682 days


#2 posted 10-24-2016 03:44 PM

I always enjoy your thorough write ups at your website. I can smell the wood being cut 8^)

Yes, those tiles can be expensive, but I look at that area of the clock as a canvas. One can put any kind of decorative element they wish in place of the tile.

Nice work!

View DaleMaley's profile

DaleMaley

289 posts in 1696 days


#3 posted 10-24-2016 03:47 PM

Thanks!

I’m glad you like my website write-ups, I try to be very thorough, and use a ton of pictures. If I come back at a later date and build another one, I always check my Lessons Learned, so I don’t repeat the same problems I had on the 1st model :)

I haven’t figured out how to bottle that great smell of freshly sawn white oak…..if I do I will post it here :)

Dale


I always enjoy your thorough write ups at your website. I can smell the wood being cut 8^)

Yes, those tiles can be expensive, but I look at that area of the clock as a canvas. One can put any kind of decorative element they wish in place of the tile.

Nice work!

- splintergroup


-- Dale, Illinois, http://dalemaley.webs.com/

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23122 posts in 2327 days


#4 posted 10-24-2016 07:36 PM

It’s a wonderful clock and so nicely done.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

1962 posts in 1726 days


#5 posted 10-24-2016 07:50 PM

Well dne and I like the combintions you used!

-- just rjR

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

292 posts in 1808 days


#6 posted 10-24-2016 09:58 PM

I made a run of 3 clocks like this a while back. I had a problem with the clock works not tightening down well on them. I’m curious if you had the same issues withe the clock works and where you bought yours. Once of these days I’m going to make another batch and I don’t want to repeat the same problems.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View DaleMaley's profile

DaleMaley

289 posts in 1696 days


#7 posted 10-24-2016 10:03 PM

I had no problelm with the clock works tightening up ok. It was the same design as most of Klock-It’s inserts…..there is a washer and a nut to tighten the movement to the supporting wood piece.

I bought the whole kit, including motawi tile and the clock movement from schsons.com

Thanks

dale


I made a run of 3 clocks like this a while back. I had a problem with the clock works not tightening down well on them. I m curious if you had the same issues withe the clock works and where you bought yours. Once of these days I m going to make another batch and I don t want to repeat the same problems.

- EarlS


-- Dale, Illinois, http://dalemaley.webs.com/

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

5042 posts in 2607 days


#8 posted 10-24-2016 10:18 PM


I haven t figured out how to bottle that great smell of freshly sawn white oak…..if I do I will post it here :)

Dale

You can find that scent in a bottle of bourbon!

And that’s a great looking G&G clock! I built one myself, and know how challenging it can be working with some of the small parts. But now that it’s finished, you’ll have a wonderful timepiece to enjoy!

-- Dean

View SteveMI's profile

SteveMI

954 posts in 2754 days


#9 posted 10-25-2016 12:47 AM

What is not to like about a G&G clock. I’ve been to the Motawi Tile shop in Ann Arbor and the prices are similar to what you paid. But are they ever gorgeous in person.

FWIW, the tiles are 5/8” thick. Surprised me the first time holding one.

Steve.

View DaleMaley's profile

DaleMaley

289 posts in 1696 days


#10 posted 10-25-2016 12:48 AM

Yes, they are very heavy, almost 3/4” thick. Yes, they are gorgeous, my photography skills don’t really do them justice.

thanks

Dale


What is not to like about a G&G clock. I ve been to the Motawi Tile shop in Ann Arbor and the prices are similar to what you paid. But are they ever gorgeous in person.

FWIW, the tiles are 5/8” thick. Surprised me the first time holding one.

Steve.

- SteveMI


-- Dale, Illinois, http://dalemaley.webs.com/

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

9097 posts in 2328 days


#11 posted 10-25-2016 05:32 AM

Awesome G&G work! Cheramics addition is realy good match.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View ejmeier's profile

ejmeier

4 posts in 150 days


#12 posted 11-30-2016 04:46 AM

I’ve just bought this plan and plan on making this in the coming weeks. I do have one question that I can’t seem to figure out:

How do you access the clock movement if you need to change the battery? It looks like once the back piece is in place, the whole thing is pretty well sealed up. What am I missing?

View DaleMaley's profile

DaleMaley

289 posts in 1696 days


#13 posted 11-30-2016 11:14 AM


I ve just bought this plan and plan on making this in the coming weeks. I do have one question that I can t seem to figure out:

How do you access the clock movement if you need to change the battery? It looks like once the back piece is in place, the whole thing is pretty well sealed up. What am I missing?

- ejmeier

The back panel of the clock is removable. It is grooved on both ends, with a drilled hole for your finger. You put your finger in the hole, push the panel up, then the bottom rotates away from the clock….....you then pull down, and the panel slips down out of its top groove….....

There is a slight error in the plans with respect to this back panel…......which I noted on my web site…..

===========
When I made the 1/4” thick back piece, I adjusted the plan dimensions to the “as-built” case dimensions. I also only had a 3/16” high rabbet in the bottom versus the plan’s 3/8” high rabbet, because it fits in a 1/8” tall groove.
==============

I understand why you had trouble figuring out the plans with respect to the back panel, I had trouble initially also. The sliding panel concept with a finger hole is a very old and common method of doing clock cases…...I just had trouble seeing how it applied on this project for a while.

Hope this helps!

-- Dale, Illinois, http://dalemaley.webs.com/

View DaleMaley's profile

DaleMaley

289 posts in 1696 days


#14 posted 11-30-2016 11:24 AM

Here is another view of the back groove design, for the removable back cover….....

-- Dale, Illinois, http://dalemaley.webs.com/

View DaleMaley's profile

DaleMaley

289 posts in 1696 days


#15 posted 11-30-2016 11:34 AM

-- Dale, Illinois, http://dalemaley.webs.com/

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