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Custom Straight Razor Scales

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Project by BrentB posted 10-18-2016 04:17 PM 893 views 4 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

My younger brother followed his passion and decided to become a barber a few years ago and his oldest son followed in his footsteps. He embraces the old fashion barber style and introduced those techniques in his own barbershop. Earlier this year he bought the old T&P Railroad Section House built in 1900 in Clyde TX and converted it into a barbershop, filling it with memories of the past from both the old barbershop and railroad era. Now he and his son work together providing the old barbershop experience.

I thought this would be a great opportunity to make something special for the new barbershop so I asked him what brand of straight razor he uses and bought 6 Parker Shavette razors to be fitted with new custom scales. I added a badge to each razor. It represents a mustache that looks similar to my brother’s. I made them out of some stainless steel spacers from an old pocket knife that was beyond repair.

This one is made from Western Cedar.

This one is made from Mesquite that was saved from the smoker’s firewood stack.

This one is made from a large Mesquite Burl.

This one is made from a local Bodark (Osage Orange or Horse Apple) tree.

This one is made from a twisted Mesquite tree root.

This one is made from some very old Bodark dating back to the year 1740 that was used as a pier under a house built in 1886.

I made a simple stand where both father and son can keep three razors at their station.

These should blend nicely in the old shop. I hope they enjoy!!

-- Brent, Johnson County Texas......Resawing is like a box of chocolates, ya never know what you're gonna get.





8 comments so far

View USAwoodArt's profile

USAwoodArt

243 posts in 408 days


#1 posted 10-18-2016 05:23 PM

Very nice… your brother should definitely be enjoying using these and their great appearance.
The old barber shop in the train station is an eye catcher also. Reminds me of the long gone days when i had hair and went to a barber…

-- Wood for projects is like a good Fart..."better when you cut it yourself"

View Notw's profile

Notw

471 posts in 1219 days


#2 posted 10-18-2016 06:02 PM

very nicely done, Sweeney Todd would be proud

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

9153 posts in 2333 days


#3 posted 10-19-2016 04:32 AM

Very proffesionaly made, very nice collection.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View buckeyedudes's profile

buckeyedudes

152 posts in 2593 days


#4 posted 10-19-2016 11:44 PM

I’m a Knife Guy (maker) and agree you did a FINE JOB.
Good work man!

-- Before you louse it up, THIMK!

View BrentB's profile

BrentB

64 posts in 212 days


#5 posted 10-20-2016 12:02 AM



I m a Knife Guy (maker) and agree you did a FINE JOB.
Good work man!

- buckeyedudes

Thanks buckeyedudes…..my wife is from Columbus!!!

-- Brent, Johnson County Texas......Resawing is like a box of chocolates, ya never know what you're gonna get.

View Jim B's profile

Jim B

57 posts in 696 days


#6 posted 10-20-2016 10:25 PM

Those look great! I have the same razor and have been thinking about doing the same thing. How did you attach the blade to the handle? Rivet?

View BrentB's profile

BrentB

64 posts in 212 days


#7 posted 10-20-2016 10:41 PM



Those look great! I have the same razor and have been thinking about doing the same thing. How did you attach the blade to the handle? Rivet?

- Jim B

Thanks Jim….I appreciate the compliment. I already had some 1/8” brass round stock. It was a shade big so I cut a 1” piece, stuck it in the drill press and took a little off with some sand paper till it fit snug. Then I peened one side of the pin, dropped it in the handles and blade to measure how much to cut off, dropped it back in and peened the other side and it worked great. I took three 1” pieces of blue painter’s tape and stacked them on top of each other. Then I took a leather punch and poked a hole through the tape the same size as the pin and put it on both sides of the handle while peening the pin. I left the tape there while sanding the pin with a small Dremel flap sanding disc followed by by some polishing with rouge to a bright shine. The whole process only took about 30 minutes. Since I had the round stock I didn’t see any reason to buy anything to do it differently. I don’t use a straight razor, but I did do a lot of reading about their restoration before starting this project and most of the guys said their clients liked the pin better than a rivet or pin screw. As you can see I also didn’t use washers with the pin. I’m not sure why anyone does to be honest unless they’re looking for more bling, but for me the wood was the bling and I didn’t want to cover any more of it up than I already was with the mustache.

-- Brent, Johnson County Texas......Resawing is like a box of chocolates, ya never know what you're gonna get.

View John Stegall's profile

John Stegall

478 posts in 2982 days


#8 posted 10-21-2016 05:28 PM

terrific job. Small world also, I have a brother buried there in Clyde. Surgical accident, took five months to die or to be pronounced dead.
Your brother has a beautiful shop. I could use one of your straight razors to cut my hair now, or the Gillette.

-- jstegall

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