LumberJocks

Tool Chest/Work Bench

  • Advertise with us
Project by ki7hy posted 10-06-2016 04:24 AM 1180 views 6 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Well, this was a fun experiment. Sorry for the long post but I want to explain my way through this one. I know this isn’t going to be everyone’s cup of tea but it came as a “need” for me. You know, how you “need” a new tool because the 1000 others won’t do?

First, this is made to look old. I rough planed it, distressed it and made it a little dirty inside with the black dust from sanding the outside a little. Seller’s replicated a 200 year old chest and I loved that chest so wanted one of my own but didn’t need a chest because I have a wall hanging cabinet I built so this one had to do more, and it does more better than I thought it would. As for the distressing, I regret some of it. I think I did it too much for my liking and the sides should be smoother. Once I waxed it, the rough planing I intentionally did was way more pronounced. Wish I hadn’t done so much of that and just made it smooth. Don’t get me wrong, it’s already received some new scratches from just moving it around and using it for awhile to test out the functions so it’s going to get beat up pretty bad anyway.

Second, the “need” is where most of you won’t dig this box. I built this because I have family that lives up north of the valley of the sun here and we like to get away to their house often. In Arizona it’s always nice to head up north. So I had the idea to build a box to hold tools and work off of so I can take to the streams, lakes, and rivers up north and just sit and work on something. It doesn’t matter what it is, just wood working. So that’s the idea of this box. I won’t be building furniture out of the box or a dining room table but I can do small boxes, bird houses, etc. The point is, I get to get out of town and my hobby gets to come with me.

Third, The idea of this box came with the need I had. I did a search to see if I could find examples and surely there must be some but the only box I could find was Shannon from The Hand Tool School and I wasn’t a huge fan. His is indeed more mobile than mine but it’s not high enough to use unless you have a table to put it on or something. I needed a height I could work off of in a fold up chair. I also didn’t like the idea of drawers. His has drawers. His is cool but wasn’t what I needed. He did give me some inspiration though and I am thankful for that.

I use a fold up hand truck to move mine around. It folds up to about the same size as the box so it’s really easy to pack it along. I can lift and carry it on my own but long distances would frustrate me so the folding hand truck is the answer.

As for the layout. I just threw in some common tools I would take along. I didn’t really organize it well because I might build some specific holders for a few things so that’s a work in progress at the moment but it’s ready to go up north tomorrow if we wanted. I have tested all the functions and find they all work better than expected so far.

Ask any questions you want to know. It was an experiment to start with but it will get plenty of use.

Photo dump:





14 comments so far

View ki7hy's profile (online now)

ki7hy

503 posts in 206 days


#1 posted 10-06-2016 04:25 AM

Here’s more photos in action:

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

9171 posts in 2335 days


#2 posted 10-06-2016 09:45 AM

I like that black colour.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

371 posts in 115 days


#3 posted 10-06-2016 11:24 AM

GREAT JOB! The “traveling” Moxon vice is quite impressive as well as the shooting board. And, I think your distressing is killer. Keep up the good work!

You wrote:
“Second, the “need” is where most of you won’t dig this box. I built this because I have family that lives up north of the valley of the sun here and we like to get away to their house often. In Arizona it’s always nice to head up north. So I had the idea to build a box to hold tools and work off of that I can take to the streams, lakes, and rivers up north and just sit and work on something. It doesn’t matter what it is, just wood working. So that’s the idea of this box. I won’t be building furniture out of the box or a dining room table but I can do small boxes, bird houses, etc. The point is, I get to get out of town and my hobby gets to come with me.”

I like that … welcome to the minimalist woodworking community … and don’t cut yourself short … I can see lots of furniture coming off of this bench!

-- Ron, Lilburn, GA

View CL810's profile (online now)

CL810

3458 posts in 2455 days


#4 posted 10-06-2016 12:31 PM

There’s lots to like about this chest David. The vise is especially clever. First time I’ve seen that. Well done!

-- "The only limits to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts of today." - FDR

View terryR's profile

terryR

6324 posts in 1776 days


#5 posted 10-06-2016 01:32 PM

Nicely done!

Took me a while, but I finally noticed the DT’d carcass. The planed surface is awesome!

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View drbyte's profile

drbyte

729 posts in 3530 days


#6 posted 10-06-2016 01:56 PM

Great job KI7HY! N8ONX here. Great looking box. How about some dimensions? I do the same thing, head out of town to family in a more remote and cooler area every chance i get. I understand your need for “portable” and my little fold-up two-wheeler is always in my vehicle!

-- Dennis, WV

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13738 posts in 2086 days


#7 posted 10-06-2016 02:33 PM

I do like this toolbox / workbench!

—The distressing is not too much, but rather looks great
—I’m insanely jealous you have a lid on the top till inside; wish I did
—The outside vise adaptation looks to be quite functional
—The combination of paint and clear finishes on the inside are outstanding

Question: Can you work the faces of boards? I guess with the shooting board there’s some opportunity, but it looks like the alum. hold down gets int he way if you have to do some more serious (or larger) work.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

371 posts in 115 days


#8 posted 10-06-2016 02:56 PM



Question: Can you work the faces of boards? I guess with the shooting board there s some opportunity, but it looks like the alum. hold down gets int he way if you have to do some more serious (or larger) work.

- Smitty_Cabinetshop

Perhaps a cleat on the shooting board to be held in the Moxon vice would alleviate this dilemma … that might also lead to other bench aids of the same fashion for say … edge jointing (??) ... possibilities are endless!

-- Ron, Lilburn, GA

View ki7hy's profile (online now)

ki7hy

503 posts in 206 days


#9 posted 10-06-2016 03:09 PM

Thanks everyone for the kind words. I thought leaving the box a little rough would look cooler especially since it will get pretty beat up over the years but was thinking I left it too rough.


Great job KI7HY! N8ONX here. Great looking box. How about some dimensions? I do the same thing, head out of town to family in a more remote and cooler area every chance i get. I understand your need for “portable” and my little fold-up two-wheeler is always in my vehicle!

- drbyte

I’ll get the exact dimensions tonight. It’s roughly 25” x 16” x 16”


I do like this toolbox / workbench!

—The distressing is not too much, but rather looks great
—I m insanely jealous you have a lid on the top till inside; wish I did
—The outside vise adaptation looks to be quite functional
—The combination of paint and clear finishes on the inside are outstanding

Question: Can you work the faces of boards? I guess with the shooting board there s some opportunity, but it looks like the alum. hold down gets int he way if you have to do some more serious (or larger) work.

- Smitty_Cabinetshop

Smitty, it’s easy to work the face of boards against the bench hook/shooting board, however, it’s not ideal because you would have to plane against grain for a small portion. There are Tnuts in place so making some low height little rounds would work well enough to be able to face plane boards or use the incra clamp to hold half the board to face plain across the top then move it to hold the other half so you can go in one direction. Lots of options with the tnuts and the moxon vice. I’m sure a lot of this will get changed up or added to as I go. Purely an experiment at the moment, I have some small projects for Christmas coming up and will maybe take the box out by my pool (away from the shop) and attempt to build them from the box to look for modifications or changes I will need. Remember, that Incra hold down is just on a T-Track so it slides off so the shooting board is flat. Also, I am going to find a better way to hold the shooting board down so I don’t have knobs sticking up. I have some ideas, should work out ok.

View ki7hy's profile (online now)

ki7hy

503 posts in 206 days


#10 posted 10-06-2016 03:11 PM

Question: Can you work the faces of boards? I guess with the shooting board there s some opportunity, but it looks like the alum. hold down gets int he way if you have to do some more serious (or larger) work.

- Smitty_Cabinetshop

Perhaps a cleat on the shooting board to be held in the Moxon vice would alleviate this dilemma … that might also lead to other bench aids of the same fashion for say … edge jointing (??) ... possibilities are endless!

- Ron Aylor

Edge jointing can be done in the vice Ron. I left some room to lay a board across the wood screws and be tightened down. Again, smaller pieces maybe 6” wide but you really never join much bigger on most projects anyway.

To add to that…I made the lid pretty hefty. Behind the holes for the screws is a piece of hickory. The whole box is poplar to try to help with weight. The lid has a dust seal on it that’s glued down so it’s fairly sturdy but the hinges are massive. They are made for shutters back in the 1800’s. Those are tough as nails, epoxied and screwed so I can work off the top without the top coming off. So the edge of the lid meeting up with the vice is really sturdy believe it or not.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

371 posts in 115 days


#11 posted 10-06-2016 03:21 PM

ki7hy – I was actually alluding to all the wonderful bench aids found in Jigs & Fixtures for the Hand Tool Woodworker by Graham Blackburn … check it out!

-- Ron, Lilburn, GA

View ki7hy's profile (online now)

ki7hy

503 posts in 206 days


#12 posted 10-06-2016 03:22 PM

Thanks Ron, I definitely will!

View ki7hy's profile (online now)

ki7hy

503 posts in 206 days


#13 posted 10-06-2016 03:27 PM



Nicely done!

Took me a while, but I finally noticed the DT d carcass. The planed surface is awesome!

- terryR


Thanks Terry,

All the sliding tills and the trim around the main carcass are DT’d. The trim around the lid isn’t but everything else is hand cut.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13738 posts in 2086 days


#14 posted 10-07-2016 04:08 AM

I like the plan, and the face planing options sound good to. Again, nice build!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com