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Replacement cutting boards

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Project by Mr_McGlue posted 09-25-2016 01:54 AM 393 views 0 times favorited 3 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Using my new workbench I made a couple replacement cutting boards for the kitchen. Our old ones (too embarrassed to show them) were made out of plywood when we moved in (17 years ago?). Just never got around to replacing them. I made two. one is a normal slide in size and the other a wide one. Used walnut for the ends and ash for the cutting part.

I used a tablesaw to rip the walnut but otherwise it was all done with hand tools. Rubbed in mineral oil for the finish.

What I learned:

1. Wouldn’t use ash for a cutting board again the grain is too raised. But it looks nice.

2. Ash is a nice hardwood. It is a lot harder than I thought.

3. I REALLY like working with walnut. Just don’t like the price :)

4. For food things mineral oil was easy to apply and cheap.

Robert

-- Robert - California





3 comments so far

View Matt Hegedus's profile

Matt Hegedus

78 posts in 255 days


#1 posted 09-25-2016 12:47 PM

Nice. Good pairing of woods.

I have so much ash on hand (got a deal). My sawyer said it was a great secondary wood. And yes it is very very hard (but works fairly nice).

-- From Pittsburgh, PA

View mrtrenier's profile

mrtrenier

2 posts in 1260 days


#2 posted 10-21-2016 12:10 PM

Beautiful work, but open pore wood, like ash, red oak and others, should not be used for cutting boards. Too easy for mold and other bacteria to contaminate food.

-- Mr. Trenier

View Mr_McGlue's profile

Mr_McGlue

12 posts in 171 days


#3 posted 10-21-2016 02:29 PM

Thank you for the compliment but I’m sorry that is simply not true. This board is replacing a similar one that we used for at least 20 years. Nobody ever got sick from the cutting board. I probably cook more than most people also.

If you would like to show me a study proving otherwise I would be happy to read it. Trust me I’m not starting an argument but sometimes things get passed around and end up being regarded as truth. The University of Wisconsin did a study on wood cutting boards and bacteria a while back which I’m sure can be googled.

If I’m wrong I’ll be the first to admit it but I’ve dealt with this topic before.

Take care,

Robert


Beautiful work, but open pore wood, like ash, red oak and others, should not be used for cutting boards. Too easy for mold and other bacteria to contaminate food.

- mrtrenier

-- Robert - California

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