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2nd-3rd-4th cutting boards

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Project by Kindlingmaker posted 1652 days ago 1941 views 0 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

While my first attempt to make a cutting board was still drying from the last coat of finish a friend came by with four weathered director chairs and asked if I wanted them. I didn’t have a need for more outside chairs but an inspiration popped into my head to strip the chairs down and make cutting boards from whatever wood I could salvage from them. After taking all the fabric and hardware off I cut all the pieces into individual boards being careful to miss the nails,cracks and cut out all the mortise and tenon joints. Each little board was run through the drum sander to remove all the paint and to true up the wood. Then the many different glue ups (TiteBond III) to make the segmented planks then cutting all of those to small strips and then more glue ups. After all the strips were glued, (all end grain), and run through the drum sander for flattening then the table saw for squaring the sides. I added a border of oak and routed all the edges smooth. Several coats of finish and then abrading the surface with oooo steel wool to give a flat sheen to the cutting boards. This was a very enjoyable project watching something change into something else. (The bottom right board has 161 segments.)

-- Never board, always knotty, lots of growth rings





15 comments so far

View Padre's profile

Padre

930 posts in 2087 days


#1 posted 1652 days ago

Those are nice, and a really good use of old wood. Better than making kindling! :)

-- Chip -----------http://www.penmanchip.com-----------------Micah 6:8

View eddy's profile

eddy

926 posts in 1962 days


#2 posted 1652 days ago

nice boards that’s making them the hard way but they came out great. 161 pieces wow
drum sanding a cutting board…. i wish
do all my with a belt sander and a lot of colorful metaphors
all kidding aside well done

-- self proclaimed copycat

View ohwoodeye's profile

ohwoodeye

991 posts in 1751 days


#3 posted 1652 days ago

Looks like a lot of work which I can certainly assume, makes the final product all that much more rewarding.
Nice job.

-- Directions are just the Manufacturer's opinion on how something should be assembled. ----Mike, Waukesha, WI

View dorran's profile

dorran

140 posts in 1832 days


#4 posted 1652 days ago

Looks good. Only 161 pieces. Still easier than using old doll furniture.

-- Life is about choices. You can spend a lot of money on furniture and have really nice furniture; Or you can spend a lot on tools and have even more expensive, crappy furniture. I made my choice.

View Dave Haynes's profile

Dave Haynes

198 posts in 1951 days


#5 posted 1651 days ago

You know what….................? That was really cool that you had the thought to dis-assemble old furniture and use the wood. I wonder if you had not have already experienced just making your own cutting board, would you have had that brainstorm.

Doesn’t really matter, the fact that you did was pretty cool and you benifited from that. Good job!!
Dave

-- Dave Haynes, Indiana, http://www.oldaveswoodshop.com

View Big_Bob's profile

Big_Bob

164 posts in 2307 days


#6 posted 1651 days ago

They look great! Much better than the old chairs. I do not have the imagination to look at a bunch of old chairs and see a cutting board. But you made the preverbal silk purse out of a sow’s ear. My wife loves it.

Thanks

-- Bob Clark, Tool Collector and Sawdust Maker

View skeeter's profile

skeeter

233 posts in 1939 days


#7 posted 1651 days ago

I like them. Just one question. Would the movement blow out the edging?

-- My philosophy: Somewhere between Norm and Roy

View Kindlingmaker's profile

Kindlingmaker

2654 posts in 2124 days


#8 posted 1650 days ago

I will use one of the boards and see what happens and add to the project if there is a “blow out”.

-- Never board, always knotty, lots of growth rings

View TwistedRedneck's profile

TwistedRedneck

41 posts in 2089 days


#9 posted 1568 days ago

Pretty cool. The one question I have is about the drum sander. I cant afford one and would love to have one. I have a set of plans for making one from wood but it has been sitting on the back burner for now. Question is, what kind of Drum Sander are others using? A bought one or shop built one? The one I have the plans for are from ShopNotes I believe. I guess two questions, since I am using my first planer, what is the difference in the results between the Drum Sander and the Planer? I see yours is bought Kindlingmaker.

-- Nails are better wood fasteners than screws, if both are applied using a hammer.

View patron's profile

patron

12955 posts in 1939 days


#10 posted 1568 days ago

twisted: the planer is grain oriented ,
the sander can ( and does ) flatten the same ,
but the grain can be from anywhere .

great for re-sawn and figured woods ,
an inlays .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View TwistedRedneck's profile

TwistedRedneck

41 posts in 2089 days


#11 posted 1568 days ago

Hmm. interesting. I got you. Basically, the planer has to go with the grain but the sander allows me to go against the grain. Now doesnt that pose a problem with sandpaper marks on the wood? I would assume that the Drum Sander would take a course grit, depending on the amount of wood you wanted to remove. That sounds like a lot of extra hand sanding afterwards just to clean up the wood. I would imagine that the best way to do that would be to take the wood down with a course grit and step the sandpaper down to a finer grit as if you did hand sand it so that you could get a better result in the end. That would mean that you would have to have multiple sanding drums already made up that you could swap out easily in the Drum Sander.

Thinking to myself really I guess. Now, how thin could i go with a Drum Sander? I know their is a limit on a planer and their are work arounds for that as well like placing the small wood on a larger base before running it through. I would guess the same for the Drum Sander.

I guess I really need to research this and pull my plans of the back burner.

-- Nails are better wood fasteners than screws, if both are applied using a hammer.

View patron's profile

patron

12955 posts in 1939 days


#12 posted 1568 days ago

twisted ,
here is a sled i used for some parts i re-sawed from 3/4” material ,
into 3 pieces , the final thickness was 3/16” , the grain was going whichever way ,
i did have to put stops to each piece , and remove all parts , after each pass ,
so thet the sawdust didn’t get under them and lift a corner .
i just use 80# sand belts on mine , any sanding marks , are easier to remove with a DA sander after the work is glued down . the planer would have left some pieces clean , some chipped up , and some lifted and destroyed completely .

here is another example of a glued up alternate wood and grain that made it thru the sander with flying colors ,
would it have made it thru the planer ?

.
KINDLING ,
sorry , i forgot to say that your boards are great !
seeing that in those chairs ,
is real vision , and great on the re-use scale !

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View TwistedRedneck's profile

TwistedRedneck

41 posts in 2089 days


#13 posted 1568 days ago

Ok, thanks. I think I took KINDLINGS post in a different direction though. Sorry KINDLING.

With an extremely low budget, I tend to make my own shop machines when I cant find them at a thrift store price. On my second RAS, the first was an old DeWalt that was made in the 40’s or so that only cost me $50.00 and was like brand new. Ex sold it before I could grab it. Sure do miss that one. Anyway, think I will make it then. At least for the pleasure of making it and I can test the use of it.

-- Nails are better wood fasteners than screws, if both are applied using a hammer.

View BarbS's profile

BarbS

2433 posts in 2683 days


#14 posted 1568 days ago

Kindling- you know how you see someone’s project and flip through the pictures before you read the text? Well, all right, I do it; don’t know about others. I thought, “what are those old chairs doing in this batch?” and voila’, there is your explanation, and it’s a great one. Congrats on the light-bulb idea and carrying it out so well. They are beautiful boards.

-- http://barbsid.blogspot.com/

View Kindlingmaker's profile

Kindlingmaker

2654 posts in 2124 days


#15 posted 1564 days ago

David and Barb, thank you!
Twisted, knowledge is where we find it and sometimes we have to grasp the moment!

-- Never board, always knotty, lots of growth rings

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