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Outdoor Sectional Couch

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Project by Ray posted 01-09-2010 08:10 AM 10344 views 12 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This is an outdoor sectional that I designed and built for my patio (acid stained concrete if anyone wants to know). The wood is Ipe, the legs 4×4 aluminum square tube, and the back supports 2×1/4” aluminum flat bar. I bought the foam and cut using an electric knife and hired a seamstress to make covers and pillows. Fabric is from Sunbrella. My first experience with a router in order for the back slats to sit flush in the back frames. The aluminum legs don’t have any sort of feet, so if anyone has a good idea for a foot that will slide more easily, wear well outside, and not risk marring the floor, please share.

-- Ray





12 comments so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112083 posts in 2230 days


#1 posted 01-09-2010 05:31 PM

Really neat Idea looks good Ray

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View JJohnston's profile

JJohnston

1577 posts in 1944 days


#2 posted 01-09-2010 05:43 PM

How about endgrain ipe plugs in the legs for feet?

-- "Sorry I'm late. Somebody tampered with my brakes." "You should have been early, then."

View Ray's profile

Ray

5 posts in 1714 days


#3 posted 01-09-2010 06:20 PM

Hmm, I like that idea. How would you suggest they attach to the aluminum (I’d rather avoid any hardware there)? I wonder if I could just route a grove around the edge to create a slightly oversized plug then just pound it into place (but niether Ipe nor aluminum are too are gong to want to give).

-- Ray

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13341 posts in 2325 days


#4 posted 01-09-2010 06:21 PM

Neat idea, Ray.

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View JJohnston's profile

JJohnston

1577 posts in 1944 days


#5 posted 01-09-2010 06:29 PM

I was thinking of just sizing them carefully, then driving them in.

-- "Sorry I'm late. Somebody tampered with my brakes." "You should have been early, then."

View Alan's profile

Alan

443 posts in 2057 days


#6 posted 01-11-2010 02:29 AM

That looks great. Thanks for posting it.

-- Alan, Prince George

View choppertoo's profile

choppertoo

296 posts in 1965 days


#7 posted 01-11-2010 05:22 AM

Very nice Ray. I would proudly display a project like this on my deck.

How about you rabbit the Ipe on all four sides to make a plug the slides into the aluminum then secure with countersunk screws or Gorilla glue if you want a cleaner look.

Shows us what you come up with for a solution.

Nice project!

-- The greatest danger for most of us is not that our aim is too high and we miss it, but that our aim is too low and we reach it.. Michelangelo

View Ben Robinson's profile

Ben Robinson

34 posts in 1659 days


#8 posted 03-03-2010 11:10 AM

That looks great, Ray! How did you like working with ipe? I’m thinking about using it on some upcoming projects. I also built an outdoor sectional with very similar cushions. Yours aren’t “paprika” sunbrella are they? Nice work!

-- Ben, Atlanta, http://www.plankandboard.com

View Ray's profile

Ray

5 posts in 1714 days


#9 posted 03-04-2010 01:12 AM

Seemed to be fairly easy to to cut and drill, though it’s hard as heck (I broke a few drill bits along the way from just not being careful enough). I used the same high tooth count blade that I used for cutting the aluminum, and that produced nice clean cuts. No sanding necessary and I still haven’t put a finish on it but it looks just great in its natural form (I’m planning on using an exotic hardwood sealer from a company named Superdeck as soon as it warms up a bit). Yes, I used Sunbrella fabric for he cushions and pillows. It was Linen Chili on the primary cushions, and Infinity Redwood and Canvas Teak on the pillows. For those interested in sources for material, I ordered fabric from Outsidefabric.com, zippers from Zipperstop.com, and foam from Rochford Suppy in MN (brace yourself for the price of foam if your doing cushions, but this place had by far the best pricing).

I think I’m going to use Choppertoo’s suggestion for the feet when I get done with current cabinet project.

-- Ray

View Ben Robinson's profile

Ben Robinson

34 posts in 1659 days


#10 posted 03-04-2010 02:36 AM

Ray – I built an outdoor sectional as well, that is totally different than yours but has some similarities (as seen here). Did you use a dacron wrapper around the foam or is it just foam and fabric? How does your foam do in the rain (maybe you don’t leave the cushions out, though). Do you mind providing a link to the exact foam that you used? My cushions are 26” deep. It looks like Rochford only offers it in 24” sections. Thanks for any tips you can offer on the cushions.

-- Ben, Atlanta, http://www.plankandboard.com

View Ray's profile

Ray

5 posts in 1714 days


#11 posted 03-05-2010 12:10 AM

That’s a really nice design!

I didn’t use a dacron wrapper, but that should work well if you wanted to give it a fuller look. I haven’t kept the foam in the rain, but I don’t think it would do too well (they do make a special foam, however, which is supposed to drain water better). My cushions are in the garage for the winter, but my long term plan is to get a water proof cover made (I haven’t found a source yet for the fabric, though there are a couple of online companies that will make custom covers). I’d have to go dig up the receipts to be sure, but I think I used 5” 3319 foam for the seat cushions and the 4” 2024 foam for the seat back cushions (both from Rochford). They have Buyer’s Guide on their website with all the specs. 26” deep makes it a challenge, as it was my impression that foam typically comes in 24” wide sections (though I’m no expert). You might call a local upholstery company and ask them (they’d probably also sell you foam). To get wider than 24” you would need to glue two pieces together (Rochford sells the glue), but it’s not trivial to get a perfectly flat surface (which I wouldn’t worry about if you were wrapping with dacron). If not, and if you were willing to pay a bit more, a local upholostery shop may be able cut and glue the foam for you (actually I did some cutting myself (use an electric knife), but asked a local company to make the long cut and they only charged me a few bucks).

-- Ray

View Emilylinda's profile

Emilylinda

1 post in 611 days


#12 posted 01-14-2013 03:13 AM

Having a nice sleeper sectional in the home or office serves so many different purposes. Of course, first it is a sectional sofa which makes arranging the so room much easier. Because it has individual sections the decoration possibilities are much greater and you will find that arranging them to fit the room is a snap.

A sectional sleeper sofa also has that hidden purpose. It can fold out to be a bed. Now there are countless scenarios when a sleeper sectional comes in handy.

These sofas are not only meant for smaller living rooms but they look very nice in spacious living rooms. Custom leather sectional sleeper sofas look very nice when placed in a straight position in larger room. This setting is usually done in offices and waiting rooms as well.

Find out how a sectional sleeper sofa can be the perfect choice for your decorating project at sectional sleeper sofa

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