LumberJocks

My Favorite Wood

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Project by Don posted 12-22-2006 01:43 AM 4151 views 6 times favorited 35 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Here’s a box that I made this year for a Christmas gift .

The primary timber, Huon Pine (Dacrydium Franklinii) is one of the slowest-growing and longest living plants in the world. It can grow to an age of 3000 years or more. Only the bristle-cone pine of North America lives longer.

Huon pine is found in western Tasmania; the central plateau and in the Huon Valley. Today, the tree is wholly protected and cannot be felled. However, wood on the forest floor remains usable after hundreds of years and is still prized by modern woodworkers, not least because of its sweet aroma. It is easy to work and highly prized by turners and carvers.

The lift-off lid is from Siky Oak (Cardwellia Sublimus).

This particular sample of Huon Pine has a fantastic bird’s eye speckle throughout and features a large knot which I reinforced with epoxy.

CCA

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://dpb-photography.me/





35 comments so far

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 2983 days


#1 posted 12-22-2006 04:36 AM

Well Don, you may never have a White Christmas (or even a sub 100 degree one) But you sure have some great woods to play with.

I can’t even imagine the “common” woods available as dimensional lumber in your local Big Box store…

I love the front of the box, the grain is fanstastic… You’ve sure been keeping yourself busy (and giving me plenty of inspiration).

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View Don's profile

Don

2599 posts in 2833 days


#2 posted 12-22-2006 05:09 AM

Thanks for your kind words, Scott.

But as a matter of fact, there is very little quality timber available in our big box stores. It has to be obtained from specialty timber dealers. It normally comes undressed. So choosing lumber becomes part of the challenge for a woodworker. I take a knife and cut or scrape back the rough surface then wet it to try and understand what’s hidden beneath.

It’s not cheap, nor is it readily available, especially to a recreational woodworker. Yep – small boxes make a lot of sense to me!

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://dpb-photography.me/

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 2983 days


#3 posted 12-22-2006 07:50 AM

So the Big Box is the same there too… cupped, twisted or run over with a fork lift (and that’s the select pine!) Seriously, I was wondering what types of wood you’ll find there as “common everyday” hardwood – rather than the standard, and somewhat limited selection of Maple/Oak/Poplar in my neck of the woods.

I have a few lumberyards nearby, with a decent assortment of species and various products, and a great one within about an hours drive that offers a fantastic selection, but that’s a special pilgrimage.

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View Don's profile

Don

2599 posts in 2833 days


#4 posted 12-22-2006 09:19 AM

Scott, I suppose it’s what you can’t get that you want. You cannot buy Maple/Oak/Poplar from a standard lumber yard. I would love it if it weren’t so.

About the only hardwood that is readily available in non-specialty yards is what is called KD Hardwood. The reason for this generic name is that it could be any of about six different, but similar species of Kiln dried Eucalypt. It’s variously called Tassie Oak, Vic Ash, etc.

But one needs to be savvy to Australian timber terminology. The European nomenclature is misleading. Neither Ash, Oak, Maple, Myrtle, and other names you would recognize are the same as their namesakes. When the Europeans first settled Australia, they identified them as such because they had some semblance of similarity (if you use your imagination).

Of course, these woods come from various species of Eucalyptus. This is true of virtually every native Australian species. They are not deciduous like American and European hardwoods. The trees retain their leaves sumer and winter which drop randomly throughout the year.

Back to your question. Many of these trees are not commercially harvested. So specialty yards pay high prices for limited availability. One needs to make frequent visits to find just the right piece of timber for the project at hand.

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://dpb-photography.me/

View Shawn's profile

Shawn

225 posts in 2810 days


#5 posted 01-11-2007 09:52 PM

wow, that dove tail is AMAZING

-- Cheers

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2956 days


#6 posted 01-14-2007 03:55 PM

Don.
I was wondering why your wood is so exotic. I think I figured it out. It’s growing upside down.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Don's profile

Don

2599 posts in 2833 days


#7 posted 01-14-2007 11:23 PM

You’ve got it,Dick. And you can imagine how hard it is to harvest our trees. The lumberjacks have to tie a rope to them before they chop the tree, else they will fall straight up, right off the face of the earth (LOL).

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://dpb-photography.me/

View Don's profile

Don

2599 posts in 2833 days


#8 posted 01-14-2007 11:24 PM

Or is that straight down? Oh, now you’ve got me confused!

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://dpb-photography.me/

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 2893 days


#9 posted 01-19-2007 05:05 AM

So if they tie a rope to the tree when it falls down off the Earth, doesn’t it take the timberjack with them? Must make it hard to find a timberjack down under there. ANd skilled Timberjacks must make a lot of money.

View Don's profile

Don

2599 posts in 2833 days


#10 posted 01-19-2007 05:13 AM

Obi, Aussie men are real men. They just hold on for dear life and dig their heels in. LOL

And I don’t mean their high-heels.

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://dpb-photography.me/

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2817 days


#11 posted 01-19-2007 12:28 PM

you guys are too funny.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2956 days


#12 posted 01-19-2007 12:51 PM

I imagine the Australians have never of heard this saying then.
“If a tree falls in the forest and no one hears it, does it make a sound?” LOL

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2817 days


#13 posted 01-19-2007 04:14 PM

and if a tree falls in the forest and nobody catches it, where does it end up?

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Don's profile

Don

2599 posts in 2833 days


#14 posted 01-19-2007 11:44 PM

Hey, I’ve hijacked my on thread! Have a look at my box at the top of all this nonsense.

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://dpb-photography.me/

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2817 days


#15 posted 01-20-2007 02:38 PM

box? You made a box?? (wink wink)

hmm wouldn’t it be nice to add facies to our messages!!

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

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