LumberJocks

My first end-grain cutting board

  • Advertise with us
Project by lightweightladylefty posted 06-04-2016 12:16 AM 14237 views 16 times favorited 19 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I made this end-grain cutting board as a wedding gift. It is approximately 13” x 18½” x 1¼”. The pattern was inspired by Sinister and greenology. [Sinister’s blog gives you all the details on how to build it; I just used different proportions and species.] The board contains 570 pieces of 6 wood species: 1. cherry, 2. walnut, 3. oak, 4. birch, 5. maple, and 6. ash. Some of the wood—especially the birch—had a considerable variation in color, making the pattern appearance less precise. I had less-than-perfect results attempting to chamfer the edges with the router so after cutting off enough to do away with the router’s chip-out, I used a utility knife to add a 45-degree chamfer to the edge. The board is finished with mineral oil.

I thought that gluing up the board would be a nightmare, but it was actually relatively easy. (I used Titebond III.) Getting the “sticks” perfect was the harder part!

I sliced the “sticks” on the band saw (to save material). Then made a jig for gluing up the blocks.

Because of the notch in the block, they all fit together very nicely.

I used CrafsMan’s method of printing on wood to include the couple’s name and wedding date and also my name in the hand-grip area and then used several coats of polycrylic over the printing.

I wanted to wood-burn the names but the limited area proved too difficult to access on the large board.

I don’t like to waste anything! So, I used the off-cuts to make two smaller boards. This elongated board is about 6¼” x 11¼” x 1” and (in these photos) is unfinished.

The lighter center piece in this 7½” x 9¼” x 1” board (not yet finished in these photos) was less than an inch thick so I glued two pieces together so one side is all the darker pattern and one side has a light-colored center piece.

The dates on the two smaller boards were wood-burned.

All your comments, questions, and suggestions for improvement are appreciated. Thanks for taking a look.

L/W

-- Jesus is the ONLY reason for ANY season.





19 comments so far

View oldrivers's profile

oldrivers

1269 posts in 1534 days


#1 posted 06-04-2016 12:40 AM

Beautiful board!

-- Soli Deo gloria!

View CFrye's profile (online now)

CFrye

10138 posts in 1807 days


#2 posted 06-04-2016 03:43 AM

You do like a challenge, don’t you? What did you use to flatten the boards after glue up? Beautiful wedding gift!

-- God bless, Candy

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

8520 posts in 2810 days


#3 posted 06-04-2016 04:58 AM

Great Job!

I’m sure it will be a well appreciated treasure.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View JimRochester's profile

JimRochester

512 posts in 1582 days


#4 posted 06-04-2016 11:46 AM

Nice job. Glad the glue up went well. When I tried it I had all sorts of trouble. The result speaks for itself. I can’t imagine anyone not treasuring this heirloom.

-- Schooled in the advanced art of sawdust and woodchip manufacturing.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

20309 posts in 3073 days


#5 posted 06-04-2016 01:27 PM

That is a beautiful cutting board. Thanks for the process shots!!

JIm

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

30765 posts in 2834 days


#6 posted 06-04-2016 01:43 PM

It’s a very nice board and a beautiful pattern.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- helluvawreck aka Charles, http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

View Donna Menke's profile

Donna Menke

617 posts in 4234 days


#7 posted 06-04-2016 01:47 PM

Unbelievable! I got a headache just thinking about the hard work and precision and patience needed for this project. I am super-impressed. Great job.

-- "So much wood. . .so little time!" www.woodworks-by-donna.com

View lightweightladylefty's profile

lightweightladylefty

3235 posts in 3680 days


#8 posted 06-04-2016 02:01 PM

Thanks for all the encouraging comments. Candy, I used my thickness sander to get it flat and then used the ROS to get those marks out.

I really wanted a juice groove around the edge but after the chamfer fiasco I was afraid it might cause chip-out and after all that work, I really didn’t want to take a chance. Can anyone advise me?

L/W

-- Jesus is the ONLY reason for ANY season.

View HillbillyShooter's profile

HillbillyShooter

5811 posts in 2260 days


#9 posted 06-04-2016 03:06 PM

Very nice with great photography to show your process. A very well deserved DT3!

-- John C. -- "Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth." George Washington

View PaulDoug's profile

PaulDoug

1511 posts in 1671 days


#10 posted 06-04-2016 03:16 PM

No way should those be used. Should be hung on the wall. Beautiful work!

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

View Donna Menke's profile

Donna Menke

617 posts in 4234 days


#11 posted 06-04-2016 04:03 PM

I would forget about adding a groove. Nobody would be idiotic enough to cut meat or watermelon on that board. It is a work of art.


Thanks for all the encouraging comments. Candy, I used my thickness sander to get it flat and then used the ROS to get those marks out.

I really wanted a juice groove around the edge but after the chamfer fiasco I was afraid it might cause chip-out and after all that work, I really didn t want to take a chance. Can anyone advise me?

L/W

- lightweightladylefty

-- "So much wood. . .so little time!" www.woodworks-by-donna.com

View bushmaster's profile

bushmaster

2976 posts in 2250 days


#12 posted 06-04-2016 04:20 PM

If that your first I am looking forward to your second, pretty hard to top this one.

-- Brian - Hazelton, British Columbia

View Mip's profile

Mip

453 posts in 2046 days


#13 posted 06-04-2016 11:21 PM

This is great for your first board! I made a tumbling block board for my nephew for his wedding, and let me tell you, that was no weekend project. With all the cutting and gluing, it took me two weeks. Good job on this board.

View JL7's profile

JL7

8646 posts in 2933 days


#14 posted 06-05-2016 04:22 PM

Wow – this is outstanding! And like the little boards too…...nice.

-- Jeff .... Minnesota, USA

View namenick's profile

namenick

17 posts in 1404 days


#15 posted 06-05-2016 06:23 PM

I make hundreds of end grain boards and gave up on routing the edge years ago. Instead, I use the following technique. Once the board is flat and even on the edges, I cut a 45 degree chamfer on the edge with my table saw. That can be left as a chamfer or sanded over to be a rounded edge. Good sanding technique makes it look like a routed edge without the inevitable chipout problem. Try it…......you’ll like it!

showing 1 through 15 of 19 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com