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Federal Period Figured Table

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Project by jonsprague0000 posted 05-31-2016 12:54 AM 1438 views 4 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

The table is a reproduction Federal Period Card table from 1800. I enjoy the challenges and fine details that come with reproducing Federal works and this was certainly one of them. The original table was acquired by the curator of The Met and is available here for comparison: http://paulkleinwald.com/product/american-federal-period-two-drawer-standsewing-table. Not bad for a reproduction, huh?

Woods
Top – Curly Cherry
Sides and Drawers – Birdseye Maple
Legs – Tiger Maple
Banding – Ribbon African Mahogany

Finish and Hardware
A wash coat of Shellac was applied followed by a coat of boiled linseed oil. The final finish is Amber and Blonde shellac wet sanded to 600. A mix of Honey Amber and Golden Brown Transtint was used on the maple to mimic the aged maple in the original piece. No other stain or dyes were used. For the hardware I chose wax cast Hepplewhite knobs from Londonderry Brasses.





15 comments so far

View oldrivers's profile

oldrivers

1123 posts in 1289 days


#1 posted 05-31-2016 01:44 AM

Beautiful materials and Workmanship

-- Soli Deo gloria!

View pottz's profile

pottz

1760 posts in 706 days


#2 posted 05-31-2016 01:48 AM

not bad at all my friend you nailed this one,5 stares great job.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

4682 posts in 1988 days


#3 posted 05-31-2016 02:20 AM

Wow! That is absolutely beautiful. What an amazing wood combination!

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

9933 posts in 2102 days


#4 posted 05-31-2016 03:45 AM

Beautiful workmanship. I love Federal furniture. Well done.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

6157 posts in 3090 days


#5 posted 05-31-2016 04:44 AM

That came out beautifully!
The figured wood is gorgeous!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View david38's profile

david38

3518 posts in 2066 days


#6 posted 05-31-2016 11:17 AM

beautiful work and wood

View CampD's profile

CampD

1564 posts in 3208 days


#7 posted 05-31-2016 11:48 AM

Beauty!

-- Doug...

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

1393 posts in 1344 days


#8 posted 05-31-2016 12:29 PM

Outstanding !!

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View hoss12992's profile

hoss12992

3884 posts in 1615 days


#9 posted 05-31-2016 02:08 PM

Beautiful work

-- The Old Rednek Workshop https://www.facebook.com/theoldrednekworkshoptn

View Julian's profile

Julian

1188 posts in 2413 days


#10 posted 05-31-2016 02:20 PM

Looks awesome.

-- Julian

View Mojo1's profile

Mojo1

260 posts in 2412 days


#11 posted 05-31-2016 04:26 PM

O it came out OK,,,,
Joking, man that is some beautiful workmanship there! Outstanding,!

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

27249 posts in 2589 days


#12 posted 05-31-2016 05:22 PM

This is a very nice table and beautifully done.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View SgtRich's profile

SgtRich

48 posts in 1534 days


#13 posted 05-31-2016 06:22 PM

First, let me say “WOW”!. That is beautiful.
Second, let me show my inexperience with finishing by asking:
Why a coat of shellac, THEN BLO, followed by more shellac? I understand shellac can be used as a sealer coat, but oil is meant to soak in. Wouldn’t the seal coat of shellac prevent this? I am a fan of both oils and shellac and still learning the various combinations of finishes to achieve greatness.

-- Every day is another opportunity to create something great. srich45251@gmail.com

View jonsprague0000's profile

jonsprague0000

103 posts in 1311 days


#14 posted 06-01-2016 03:32 AM

SgtRich – With Cherry I often lay down a wash coat of shellac and then very lightly sand before I add oils. This helps reduce blotching and evens out the finish. The wash coat is thinned Shellac that is cut to around a lb with denatured alcohol. The shellac mainly soaks into the end grain so that the blotching isn’t as extreme and doesn’t really affect the long grain. It is thin enough that it doesn’t prevent the oil from soaking in.

Basically just blotch control and then I apply several shellac layers at the end for the real finish.

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

17449 posts in 2911 days


#15 posted 06-01-2016 08:41 AM

Great work on this piece of history

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

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