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Recycled Counter-top

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Project by Don posted 12-19-2006 08:47 AM 2739 views 4 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Here’s another box I made for a friend’s birthday. The primary wood is River Red-Gum from a recycled counter-top. The burl inset lid is Amboyna. The lid tab is Ebony inset with a curved dovetail into the mitered lid frame. The tray is Australian Blackwood and the accent trim under the lid is Tassie Oak. The walls of the box are only 10mm thick which made inserting the 8mm Lid Stay into a mortise a real challenge. The dovetail joints in the box are cut by hand without the use of any jigs. The tray fits snugly forming a vacuum making it difficult to remove – hence the knob for this purpose. The nice thing is, that when you replace the tray in the box, it sinks slowly back into its position – a perfect fit, and wood expansion hasn’t been a problem so far.

The box is Intentionally masculine in design for a male friend.

CCA

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://www.dpb-photos.com/





9 comments so far

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12292 posts in 2782 days


#1 posted 04-14-2007 11:11 PM

Another great box Don. Thanks for sharing.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3966 posts in 2748 days


#2 posted 04-14-2007 11:34 PM

Don, you totally rock in the small box world.
And the woods you have available make me swoon. Of course, we have Claro walnut and Bigleaf Maple etc. in the U.S.

I have three questions:
First isn’t a mm. about the same as a 1/16th imperial?
Second, did you have to mop your brow for several minutes after plunging that lid support mortise,
and what’s a Canuck doing in Aussie country?

Oh a fourth question, are the lid miters splined and what with?

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 3012 days


#3 posted 04-15-2007 12:19 AM

Douglas… Don’s probably answered some of your questions over the course of many project postings, comments, and of course his profile… He’s done some spectacular stuff…

I too would love to get my hands on some of those timbers.

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2984 days


#4 posted 04-15-2007 01:18 AM

Don
This is another of your beauties I must have missed.
These new members are waking us older members up.
Plus I think the shuffle is helping also.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12292 posts in 2782 days


#5 posted 04-15-2007 01:21 AM

There is so much good stuff here I would hate to miss anything…. Don, your work is inspiring. I have box making on my list of things to do.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Don's profile

Don

2600 posts in 2861 days


#6 posted 04-15-2007 06:04 AM

Quote Douglas Bordner: ”I have three questions:
First isn’t a mm. about the same as a 1/16th imperial?”

I’m not sure that I want to open the whole metric vs Imperial debate again. But to answer your question, no.

The best way to do the compare is to convert both metric and imperial into decimal fractions. 1/16 = .0625”, 1mm = .03937”, therefore 1mm is closer to 1/32”, or .03125”.

But the whole point of working in metric is that you don’t have any calculations to make. In fine woodworking, everything is measure millimeters. It’s not until you start measuring lengths significantly longer that 2 meters that you might express a length in centimeters or meters. But since both of these measurements are a factor of ten, the conversion is a very simple matter. Anyone who works in the metric system will tell you that you simply forget about the Imperial equivalent – it becomes irrelevant (he says climbing down from one of his favorite hobby horses.)

”Second, did you have to mop your brow for several minutes after plunging that lid support mortise.”

Yes, I actually sized the thickness of this box before choosing the hinge. I wasn’t sure that I could make it fit, but I did. Now, if I plan to use this hing, I’ll keep the wall thickness to about 15mm.

”and what’s a Canuck doing in Aussie country?”

As my profile states, I moved here from Canada in the late eighties. It was a job transfer. I was asked to head up an Australian subsidiary of a Chicago based manufacturing company. It was supposed to be a five year assignment, but here I am almost twenty years later. I love the place as much as I do Canada.

”Oh a fourth question, are the lid miters splined and what with?”

Yes, they are splined with Tassie Oak.

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://www.dpb-photos.com/

View mcoyfrog's profile

mcoyfrog

3265 posts in 2279 days


#7 posted 08-04-2008 08:32 PM

Great box…

-- Wood and Glass they kick (well you know) Have a great day - Dug

View Bradford's profile

Bradford

1434 posts in 2507 days


#8 posted 05-12-2010 10:18 PM

Don, again another cool box. Thanks.

-- so much wood, so little time. Bradford. Wood-a-holics unanimous president

View Don's profile

Don

2600 posts in 2861 days


#9 posted 05-12-2010 11:32 PM

Thanks for your comment – I had forgotten about this box. And though I have become much less active in woodworking, I still love small wooden boxes!

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://www.dpb-photos.com/

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