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Wine Racks

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Project by TZH posted 12-16-2009 07:01 AM 2537 views 8 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Here’s three wine racks made from the same tree (a Douglas Fir which was about to fall over on our barn, so had to remove it or risk losing the barn). Each is 6 inches thick. Drilling the holes was the hardest part of these projects. I tried a 3 5/8” self feed bit, but clocked myself pretty good in the shin (twice – I’m kind of a slow learner) because of the amount of torque being applied, so went back to a three step process of using a hole saw, a router, and then the hole saw again to get through. I had to go at it from both sides of the slab which is a lot of work, but the results have been well received by everyone who has seen them so far. Sanding in the holes was done with a simple flapsander wheel I bought at Ace Hardware for $5.99, and it worked great.

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dead-Wood-Renaissance/361417090585685





12 comments so far

View JAGWAH's profile

JAGWAH

929 posts in 1739 days


#1 posted 12-16-2009 07:07 AM

Looks great! Had you thought about drilling vertically along the edge, creating almost an Indian headdress look? Not drilling all the way thru but deep enough to house the bottles. Just a thought for the next ones.
They really do look great.

-- ~Just A Guy With A Hammer~

View hootr's profile

hootr

183 posts in 2001 days


#2 posted 12-16-2009 03:45 PM

good save from the camp fire
how do you control the hole saw on the 2nd pass and keep it centered?

jagwah: that would look cool but the bottle needs to be tipped down, that keeps the cork wet so the air can’t reach the wine in long term storage

-- Ron, Missouri

View JAGWAH's profile

JAGWAH

929 posts in 1739 days


#3 posted 12-16-2009 04:25 PM

I never keep my wine long enough for this to matter.

Bob gets snookered.

-- ~Just A Guy With A Hammer~

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112089 posts in 2232 days


#4 posted 12-16-2009 06:36 PM

This came out great a unique design and well done

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View BlankMan's profile

BlankMan

1487 posts in 2008 days


#5 posted 12-21-2009 09:26 AM

Really great idea and they look great. I would have never thought of that.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

View TZH's profile

TZH

425 posts in 1795 days


#6 posted 12-21-2009 05:17 PM

Thanks to all of you for your positive comments. As far as controlling the hole saw and keeping it centered on the second pass is concerned, it’s really not that hard. The pilot in the hole saw keeps it centered, and the first cut helps with control. After the first cut, I always use a long bit to drill all the way through the piece, and then I come at it with a first cut from the other side. The two-directional cut doesn’t always line up perfectly, but close enough to make sanding the inside of the “chute” fairly easy. I’m still trying to figure out something a little easier to control the self-feeding bit, but haven’t stumbled on it yet. Making one cut all the way through would certainly be a LOT less time consuming and labor intensive. I just don’t have the strength to adequately control the torque the self-feed bit and 1/2 inch drill put out. Ideas are certainly welcome.

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dead-Wood-Renaissance/361417090585685

View closetguy's profile

closetguy

744 posts in 2547 days


#7 posted 12-21-2009 05:54 PM

This is a great idea. I am in the process of splitting up a 150 year old red oak for firewood. I have pulled out a few 15” diameter logs to make into lazy susans, but I was trying to figure out what I could do with some of the other logs rather than waste it all on firewood.

I’m thinking that I could drill a lot of smaller holes, using a small auger bit to remove much of the waste, and then run a 3.5” or 4” forstner bit through it. With it clamped in a drill press, it would run through straight.

-- I don't make mistakes, only design changes....www.dgmwoodworks.com

View TZH's profile

TZH

425 posts in 1795 days


#8 posted 12-21-2009 07:41 PM

closetguy, please let me know how that works for you. I don’t have a very big drill press, so wasn’t able to do what you are suggesting. I did try cutting the circle very shallow and using a 1/2” drill bit to go down straight through followed up with the bigger self feed bit, but it still threw me around more than I could handle (again, I don’t have a big enough drill press to do this, so had to stand on the piece to hold it in place). Good luck, and I REALLY hope your idea works!

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dead-Wood-Renaissance/361417090585685

View closetguy's profile

closetguy

744 posts in 2547 days


#9 posted 12-23-2009 02:18 AM

I can imagine that would be tough without a drill press. Another thought would be to make a MDF template hole, use it to guide a PC template bushing to get the hole to a partial depth, then change to a bearing mounted flush straight bit. The bearing mounted bit would follow the original hole diameter all the way through. You would have to have a router bit extension to make it that far, but it sounds good to me in theory.

-- I don't make mistakes, only design changes....www.dgmwoodworks.com

View TZH's profile

TZH

425 posts in 1795 days


#10 posted 12-23-2009 04:31 AM

closetguy, you know, your idea just might work (and better than what I was doing). Sounds like the extension might allow me to use the router to go a lot deeper and get a smoother cut overall. I think I’d still need to go from both sides of the slab, but maybe this way, the cuts would line up better, too. I won’t be able to do this for awhile as I did some research and the router bit extensions are pretty expensive (gotta sell a few of these wine racks and reinvest). If you try it, please let me know how it goes.

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dead-Wood-Renaissance/361417090585685

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4524 posts in 1729 days


#11 posted 12-26-2009 07:03 PM

Very nice. When I have had to drill big holes I clamp the wood securely in place and first drill a 1” hole with a forstner bit. Then I make a pass with a 1.5” forstner bit. I continue until I am up to the size I want. With some woods I am able to take bigger steps. I also advise sharpening your forstner bits (not hard to do). Some forstner bits are not adequately sharp even when they are brand new.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View TZH's profile

TZH

425 posts in 1795 days


#12 posted 12-26-2009 08:07 PM

richgreer, thanks for the advice. Do you do your drilling on a drill press, or do you use a 1/2” drill and go in “freehand”? Your idea sounds interesting, but after clocking my shin pretty good using a drill (twice, no less), I’m not too anxious to try that again, and my drill press is a radial which doesn’t give me a whole lot of throat capacity for my six inch thick slabs. Thanks again for any advice you can give.

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dead-Wood-Renaissance/361417090585685

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