LumberJocks

Candy Dispenser

  • Advertise with us
Project by rooster posted 12-10-2009 02:15 PM 10812 views 14 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I built this as a Christmas present for my little girl. It is made from red oak and the finish is simply wiped on mineral oil. I’ll probably have to redo the bottom since I underestimated the speed at which gravity will propel M&Ms out of the chute. Some of the M&Ms come to rest in the tray, others continue their journey to the counter/floor/under the oven/etc. Luckily the bottom is just screwed on, so I can easily replace it with a larger/more functional tray.

Merry Christmas everyone!





14 comments so far

View Chris Davis's profile

Chris Davis

1560 posts in 4123 days


#1 posted 12-10-2009 02:55 PM

That is great! Tell us how it works.

-- Watch live video from our shop. http://www.wwbeds.com/#!current-projects/c3c1

View nailbanger2's profile

nailbanger2

1041 posts in 3285 days


#2 posted 12-10-2009 03:04 PM

That is absolutely beautiful. And she will probably give it to her little girl. Way to go , Dad!

-- Wish I were Norm's Nephew

View A Slice of Wood Workshop's profile

A Slice of Wood Workshop

1074 posts in 3315 days


#3 posted 12-10-2009 03:45 PM

This looks like a great gift. Is that just a handle she will have to turn to make the candy come out or does she have to dispense coins somewhere? Being a father myself, you must be leaving the wife with your daughter after all this chocolate has been ate.

-- Follow me on YouTube- http://YouTube.com/user/asliceofwoodworkshop

View rooster's profile

rooster

116 posts in 4079 days


#4 posted 12-10-2009 03:47 PM

Chris,

The mechanism is just a simple dowel with a blind hole. When you turn the knob the dowel hole will line up with the top chute and collect a few M&Ms. Keep turning the knob and the dowel hole lines up with the bottom chute and gravity takes over from there. Sometimes the M&Ms get stuck and you have to give the knob a little shake, but it works fairly well.

Tim,
No coins, just a turn of the knob.

View cabinetmaster's profile

cabinetmaster

10874 posts in 3699 days


#5 posted 12-10-2009 03:53 PM

That is so neat. Great job.

-- Jerry--A man can never have enough tools or clamps

View OutPutter's profile

OutPutter

1199 posts in 4132 days


#6 posted 12-10-2009 05:06 PM

Great project. Have you thought about putting a little flap over the exit hole like the ones at the store have to keep the M&M speed down? Thanks and Merry Christmas rooster.

Regards,

-- Jim

View rooster's profile

rooster

116 posts in 4079 days


#7 posted 12-10-2009 05:23 PM

Jim, that is a genius idea. I would just need to make sure the flap doesn’t take away from the rest of the design. Hmmm, something to think about.

View RexMcKinnon's profile

RexMcKinnon

2593 posts in 3337 days


#8 posted 12-10-2009 05:39 PM

Cool, my daughter would empty it in minutes but she would love it.

-- If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail!

View russv's profile

russv

262 posts in 3311 days


#9 posted 12-10-2009 09:30 PM

how do you clean ?

russv

-- yknotwood.com: where to go because you don't want no stinking plastic!

View jockmike2's profile

jockmike2

10635 posts in 4388 days


#10 posted 12-10-2009 10:34 PM

Totally cool idea. I’d love to make one for the grandkids.

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

View rooster's profile

rooster

116 posts in 4079 days


#11 posted 12-10-2009 10:46 PM

russv,

The knob in front is glued to the dowel, the knob in the back is held to the dowel with a screw. So I can unscrew the back knob and then slide out the front knob/dowel assembly. The jar will obviously just unscrew from the lid. So, I think cleaning will be fairly easy when necessary.

View russv's profile

russv

262 posts in 3311 days


#12 posted 12-11-2009 04:00 AM

rooster,

Please don’t take this wrong, (but to me) easy access is critical to a sanitary unit. The fact that you need a tool makes it less likely to be cleaned on a regular basis. I am overly cautious about cleaning anything that comes in contact with food (or candy). I have built probably a hundred different gumball and candy dispensing machines. After many failures, now mine designs come apart easily to promote hassle-free cleaning. Just a suggestion, but maybe make one side of your box removable, with a hinge or magnets so one can clean the inside without needing tools. I’m not trying to tell you how to build it, just suggesting ways of keeping it sanitary for the kids and grandkids.

i just posted a couple of my versions of a candy dispensers to view if you would like. the pics include disassembled and assemble dispensers so you can maybe get some ideas.

Merry Christmas to all

russv

-- yknotwood.com: where to go because you don't want no stinking plastic!

View rooster's profile

rooster

116 posts in 4079 days


#13 posted 12-11-2009 02:48 PM

russv,

Thanks for the info. I’ll check out your posting.

View Firebreather's profile

Firebreather

106 posts in 2247 days


#14 posted 09-05-2012 03:19 AM

been looking for something like this

-- God is good..All the time

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com