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You Don't Paint Oak Black!

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Project by Dave Rutan posted 05-04-2016 07:07 PM 1517 views 1 time favorited 18 comments Add to Favorites Watch

My pastor found an architect’s concept painting of what our church might look like. It sat displayed on a shelf in the library for a few weeks and then he mentioned that it ought to be framed. Having recently rescued some old oak flooring from a dumpster (actually a trailer) I piped up that I could make a frame. While we were discussing it, he said something to the effect that I could paint the frame black. I replied that you don’t paint oak, but that I would put a black matte around the picture.

I cleaned the boards up by planing them down a bit. I put a rabbet on one edge of the boards. This will hold the glass, matte, picture and backer.

Then I tried an experiment that I’ve had in mind. I pulled out my old tapering jig which I built just because we all need such a thing, right? This is the kind of jig that’s recently been labeled as deathly dangerous, so it’s a good thing that I made that new, improved, better tapering/jointing jig.

I saw somewhere that some use something like this as a coving guide on the table saw, so I cut the fence leg short and removed the stop block on the angling leg. After setting it up to cut only on the back half of the blade, I ran the oak pieces through making several passes. I put the cove on the inward facing edge of the frame to add some dimension to it. I feel the result came out well.

After sanding the cove and the flat faces I used my miter sled to cut the corners. Then I routed an ogee profile on the outer edge of the frame (this was actually a mistake, but it turned out Okay. It would have made my life a little easier if I had put the ogee on the frame after it was glued together.)

I glued the frame together using my large picture frame clamp. Then I finished it with…

Danish oil.

I bought the matte and plexiglass and cut them to size. The matte just needed a little taken off around the outside edges. I used a piece of black poster board for the back piece and held everything in with glazier’s points.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!





18 comments so far

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Dave Rutan

1316 posts in 1582 days


#1 posted 05-04-2016 07:09 PM

The blue blob on the back is a hanger and nail held on with painter’s tape until I’m told where to hang the picture.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

8390 posts in 2262 days


#2 posted 05-04-2016 07:11 PM

You did good work for your pastor with that professionaly made frame. I think this good act will return to you in many good variations.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

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Dave Rutan

1316 posts in 1582 days


#3 posted 05-04-2016 07:34 PM



You did good work for your pastor with that professionaly made frame. I think this good act will return to you in many good variations.

- majuvla

Thanks.

When I was buying the matte I looked at the cheaper frames for sale. My joints are tighter than theirs!

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

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Dave Rutan

1316 posts in 1582 days


#4 posted 05-04-2016 07:35 PM

Sorry about the tittle change folks. I had that title figured out even before I put saw to wood, but forgot it until just now.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2348 posts in 1585 days


#5 posted 05-04-2016 08:12 PM

Nice looking frame, well done. As for the “mistake”, some of my best designs in woodworking come from “mistakes”. It’s called design on the fly.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View kiefer's profile

kiefer

4873 posts in 2061 days


#6 posted 05-04-2016 10:56 PM

Very nice result on the frame Dave .
Those mistakes I call “design opportunities ” and I do that a lot .
I have painted oak black with some nice results and the practise is quite common and done with various techniques, I use India ink and it’s easy to do .

-- Kiefer https://www.youtube.com/user/woodkiefer1/videos

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robscastle

3153 posts in 1598 days


#7 posted 05-05-2016 01:49 AM

Thats one impressive church Dave
In fact it looks to be an open air job?
As Oak is great for ebonising so if you still want it black you could have a go at it.
A simple process steel wool and vinegar.

Did your camera fail again?

-- Regards Robert

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

1316 posts in 1582 days


#8 posted 05-05-2016 10:59 AM



Very nice result on the frame Dave .
Those mistakes I call “design opportunities ” and I do that a lot .
I have painted oak black with some nice results and the practise is quite common and done with various techniques, I use India ink and it s easy to do .

- kiefer

I’m sure there are times to do that. For me though this wasn’t one of them. I’m not trying to offend anyone.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

1316 posts in 1582 days


#9 posted 05-05-2016 11:03 AM



Thats one impressive church Dave
In fact it looks to be an open air job?
As Oak is great for ebonising so if you still want it black you could have a go at it.
A simple process steel wool and vinegar.

Did your camera fail again?

- robscastle

Open air job. I don’t understand. Maybe after the caffeine kicks in.

I can say though that the church as built isn’t as big as what the painting makes it look like. Also, it’s built on the side of hill, but the painting shows it on flat ground. Likely just a concept illustration before the land was even purchased.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

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Dave Rutan

1316 posts in 1582 days


#10 posted 05-05-2016 06:02 PM

Thanks everyone for putting this project in the Daily Top 3!

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

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Mean_Dean

4867 posts in 2541 days


#11 posted 05-06-2016 12:09 AM

Great looking frame, Dave! And you’re right—you don’t paint oak! If you want it painted, use poplar!

By the way, how did you get those pointed tacks into the oak? I’ve tried using those things before, but they just don’t want to go into wood. I’ve even tried drilling pilot holes, without much luck either.

-- Dean

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Dave Rutan

1316 posts in 1582 days


#12 posted 05-06-2016 12:16 AM



Great looking frame, Dave! And you re right—you don t paint oak! If you want it painted, use poplar!

By the way, how did you get those pointed tacks into the oak? I ve tried using those things before, but they just don t want to go into wood. I ve even tried drilling pilot holes, without much luck either.

- Mean_Dean

They didn’t go in well, and they aren’t all the way in, but well enough. I did it by pushing them in with a wide bladed screwdriver with a few taps from a mallet. A narrow putty knife might work better, or an old, dull wood chisel. While I was tapping I worried about my glued joints!

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

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McFly

173 posts in 421 days


#13 posted 05-06-2016 01:40 AM

“Ya don’t paint oak black”

AMEN!

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robscastle

3153 posts in 1598 days


#14 posted 05-06-2016 11:29 AM

OK Dave I took another look at your church photo, at the right under the roof section there appears to be a congreation seated, or maybe my poor eyesight is to blame.
You may be able to borrow a camera that takes decent photos from one of the members and take another three pictures to clarify this issue.

Pointed tacks:
There ia a tool for putting the points, and I dont mean the operator, just apply a gentlle push and its done, no hammering, banging or tapping, just a gentle push.

-- Regards Robert

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Dave Rutan

1316 posts in 1582 days


#15 posted 05-06-2016 11:56 AM

Robert, I believe you’re seeing the shrubbery along the walls of the church that the architect had in mind. If I ever see one of those tools I may buy one, but I think my smallest pry bar might also serve. Even so, oak is not easy to push those points into.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

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