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Kayak paddle attempt

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Project by Marc Craig posted 04-19-2016 11:27 AM 1012 views 1 time favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I needed a new paddle for my kayak. Well I thought I would give a wooden one a try. It is made from Alder maple and cedar. It is a lot heavier than I thought it would be that’s why I am calling it an attempt I like the look but the weight will kill me on long trips. there are 3 coats of spar varnish and all the knots and tips of the blades are covered in epoxy. It will get its use this summer for sure but I will probably have to remake it. Shaped with all hand tools which makes this monster a labor of love.

-- "Far and away the best prize that life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing" TR #26





9 comments so far

View TinWhiskers's profile

TinWhiskers

179 posts in 343 days


#1 posted 04-19-2016 11:36 AM

That is a huge paddle. Ever check out a Greenland?

I was told the epoxy and varnish will blister your hands. I coat mine in tung oil or linseed oil. Maybe epoxy the tips if I see any cracks.

That is a good looking paddle.

View Marc Craig's profile

Marc Craig

20 posts in 311 days


#2 posted 04-19-2016 11:59 AM

The length is sized for me specifically I should have taken more off the blades but I liked the cedar tips. I guess its just the look of the fat blades that I like but I checked out the greenland style and those are beautiful. I think I’ll have to try ones of those next. I might have to make some grips if I start to blister thanks for the tips!


That is a huge paddle. Ever check out a Greenland?

I was told the epoxy and varnish will blister your hands. I coat mine in tung oil or linseed oil. Maybe epoxy the tips if I see any cracks.

That is a good looking paddle.

- TinWhiskers


-- "Far and away the best prize that life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing" TR #26

View mtenterprises's profile

mtenterprises

933 posts in 2084 days


#3 posted 04-19-2016 12:23 PM

Made this Greenland paddle many years ago. Spruce shaft red cedar blades finished in shellac. Very light great for open water.

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/44216106@N07/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

View rctomps's profile

rctomps

45 posts in 1367 days


#4 posted 04-19-2016 02:42 PM

Beautiful Paddle. Great job. I can see that it was a labor of love.
My first paddle back in the 70’s was a wooden paddle that I purchased, it was prettier than the
modern composite one I use now. Unfortunately I lost it on the Klamath river.

-- Rob

View Marc Craig's profile

Marc Craig

20 posts in 311 days


#5 posted 04-19-2016 03:58 PM

That’s a great looking paddle, That style is so different than what I normally see in Ohio. I really like the wood color variations you used.


Made this Greenland paddle many years ago. Spruce shaft red cedar blades finished in shellac. Very light great for open water.

- mtenterprises


-- "Far and away the best prize that life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing" TR #26

View Dan Wolfgang's profile

Dan Wolfgang

28 posts in 198 days


#6 posted 04-20-2016 12:55 AM

Looks nice! Did you choose the blade shape specifically or is it just a shape you liked? Based on the blade width/length proportions I would guess this is supposed to be a high-angle paddle. I don’t paddle a sit-on-top, but I think a low-angle blade shape is much more typical of sit-on-top paddlers. How big of an area does the face of each blade cover? It looks quite large and aggressive to me. Anyway, check out the blade shapes of other premium paddles (not the cheap things you find at big box stores) and you can see how their shapes are optimized. An obvious spot you could shave off some weight and create a more efficient paddle is the bottom where the blade enters the water—flattening lets you get it in more quickly and would allow you to pull sooner in your stroke. That may be more technique than you want to know about but studying blade shapes and sizes will help you create a blade with minimal weight.

http://wernerpaddles.com/ has lots of info on their own paddles, of course, but also on sizing a paddle, choosing a paddle for specific activities, and blade size—which would lead you to optimum shapes for your use. There are, of course, going to be significant differences between what can be done with fiberglass and carbon fiber, and what can be done with wood but I bet you can end up with a much lighter paddle.

View Marc Craig's profile

Marc Craig

20 posts in 311 days


#7 posted 04-20-2016 11:03 AM

Dan,
Thank you so much for the info, most of this paddle was made with scrap wood so that kinda dictated the shape I ran into some knots and just ended up keeping them. I had made a canoe paddle last year and I guess made a double ended one on accident. I am going to take your advice and do some more research for the next one. the werner site is a great tool thank you for sharing that with me! The blades I would guess I didn’t really take notice when I took it our probably use 1/3 or less of the entire face while in use so I definitely can improve on the design and size. I know what your saying about the flat edge I liked the cedar on the sides so I think I left a bit more than I should have. again thank you for the feed back that is my favorite part of L Js getting people with some real knowledge help you improve!


Looks nice! Did you choose the blade shape specifically or is it just a shape you liked? Based on the blade width/length proportions I would guess this is supposed to be a high-angle paddle. I don t paddle a sit-on-top, but I think a low-angle blade shape is much more typical of sit-on-top paddlers. How big of an area does the face of each blade cover? It looks quite large and aggressive to me. Anyway, check out the blade shapes of other premium paddles (not the cheap things you find at big box stores) and you can see how their shapes are optimized. An obvious spot you could shave off some weight and create a more efficient paddle is the bottom where the blade enters the water—flattening lets you get it in more quickly and would allow you to pull sooner in your stroke. That may be more technique than you want to know about but studying blade shapes and sizes will help you create a blade with minimal weight.

http://wernerpaddles.com/ has lots of info on their own paddles, of course, but also on sizing a paddle, choosing a paddle for specific activities, and blade size—which would lead you to optimum shapes for your use. There are, of course, going to be significant differences between what can be done with fiberglass and carbon fiber, and what can be done with wood but I bet you can end up with a much lighter paddle.

- Dan Wolfgang


-- "Far and away the best prize that life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing" TR #26

View GerardoArg1's profile

GerardoArg1

926 posts in 1385 days


#8 posted 04-20-2016 11:08 AM

Like the padle! Nice Job. Try other woods more lights. Here we use cedar or kiri. Maybe timbo. Local woods, but can find kiri in your local saler is more global.

-- Disfruta tu trabajo (enjoy your work) (Bandera, Argentina)

View herbritchie's profile

herbritchie

9 posts in 1661 days


#9 posted 04-22-2016 02:39 PM

Looks great. let us know how it feels in the water…

I was looking at making one of these…
http://www.qajaqusa.org/QK/makegreen2.pdf

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