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Bandsaw log sled and resaw fence for any bandsaw

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Project by Bob #2 posted 2433 days ago 57095 views 254 times favorited 48 comments Add to Favorites Watch

For more info and pictures visit my Blog:
http://mywoodadventures.blogspot.com/2011/01/bandsaw-log-sled-and-resaw-fence-for.html

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner





48 comments so far

View TreeBones's profile

TreeBones

1821 posts in 2524 days


#1 posted 2433 days ago

This is great Bob. It is a miniature version of some big mills I have seen. I’ll be looking to see some of the finished pieces that started here.

-- Ron, Twain Harte, Ca. Portable on site Sawmill Service http://westcoastlands.net/Sawmill.html http://westcoastlands.net/SawBucks2/phpBB3 http://www.portablesawmill.info

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2522 days


#2 posted 2433 days ago

Thanks Ron:
I just checked your Website and it looks like you have me beat with that mother of all Wood misers!

I was actually thinking of a smaller rig for retirement to grab up some of the Urban forest here which is currently going to the mulchers.

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2939 posts in 2495 days


#3 posted 2433 days ago

Bob,

Now you can saw your own logs the way you want. Who knows what “rare jewels” of wood are locked in some of those inconspicuous logs out there.

Way to go!

Thanks for sharing your knowledge with us.

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2939 posts in 2495 days


#4 posted 2433 days ago

Bob,

Question:

When can you cut a log up like this?

I imagine that they have a lot of water in them when newly cut. Do you have to wait any length of time?

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2537 days


#5 posted 2433 days ago

Bob, that’s pretty cool. The pipe clamp holds the log in place against the front upright and the back upright just aligns the pipe clamp? Is that correct?

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2522 days


#6 posted 2433 days ago

Mot:
You are sharper than me.
It took me a few glances at the jig before I realized I didn’t need big bracing on the ends.
I am going to make up a larger foot for the free end of the clamp with a bit of sponge on it to give a bit more bite where the ends are not flush with the clamp face.
Right now I am making a small outfeed table to carry the log across to my table saw out feed for a bit more stability.

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2522 days


#7 posted 2433 days ago

Tom:
I generally leave my logs whole for at least a year to help prevent cupping . It doesnt stop checking on the ends but it seems to eliminate waney slabs after I cut them. The pros say to get the wood down to 12 % humidity then cut em.
I have sofar just covered my stuf on top with a tarp and let ma nature do the drying.
The boards drop to around 8% when I bring them into the shop for stickering.

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2800 days


#8 posted 2433 days ago

I like it Bob, I’m showing your thread on my Rikon review.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2939 posts in 2495 days


#9 posted 2433 days ago

Bob,

Thanks for your reply to my question.

I think I’m going to have to start looking for some downed trees, so I can start cutting my own logs. It seems like it would be fun to mill your own lumber – especially if you could get some rare woods for small projects.

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2800 days


#10 posted 2433 days ago

We have a compost dump in our town, & you can also haul your brush there,. sometimes I pick up some short logs there. I recently brought home some 8 to 10” cedar logs, about 3’ long.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Tony's profile

Tony

978 posts in 2531 days


#11 posted 2433 days ago

Hi Bob

I do not understand this comment “The pros say to get the wood down to 12 % humidity then cut em”

I cut lumber all the time, and I cut it wet. If you wait for a log to dry out to 12%, depending upon the size of the log you may have to wait longer than your own lifetime.

Bandsaw the logs wet – sticker them (12” apart) and place a concrete block on top. leave them outside until they achieve about 18% (you do not want that moisture in your shop – do you?) then move them inside and nleave them until you get the desired MC (moisture content)

Just for intrest my “Bird Cherry is now down to 12% inside and 25% outside http://lumberjocks.com/jocks/Tikka/blog/1352 I am going to get to use it sooner than I thought

do not forget to clean the saw and blades – wet wood and nice shiny steel = RUST

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2522 days


#12 posted 2433 days ago

You could be right Tony.
I am quoting from a Finewoodworking video that I watched this morning.
There is an interview with a professional Sawyer (Dave and Carol Spacht) and those were his recommendations.

I did not know what my wood had as a percentage . I don’t have a moisture meter.

I used to weigh it but now I just do it as I said.

A I said, I leave it under a tarp for a year then cut and sticker it.
So far no problems.
I think it might vary with the density of the wood being dried with pine, spruce etc being faster that say Beech and birch?
I am at the stage in my life where I no longer buy ripe bananas so I guess I’m due for kiln dried wood too . <vbg>

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Jeff's profile

Jeff

91 posts in 2449 days


#13 posted 2433 days ago

That looks to be very usefull, I have a old bandsaw very old I don’t know if I could ever resaw like this but it would be worth a try.

-- Jeff B.

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2522 days


#14 posted 2433 days ago

Jeff:
I have and older version of this jig that I used on an import 14”.
If it could help you, I would be happy to post it.
Power is a big factor in smooth cutting but patience got me through many times.

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View David's profile

David

1970 posts in 2640 days


#15 posted 2413 days ago

Bob -

Very useful posting . . . I might have to build a smaller version for my saw.

Thanks!

-- http://foldingrule.blogspot.com

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