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Wine stoppers

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Project by rustfever posted 11-28-2009 05:17 AM 1381 views 3 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

A sampling of my Wine stopper turnings. In the first pic, #1 is a wild Cherry, then 3 Claro walnut stoppers, Manazanita Burl (with worm holes.) 2 samples of Carob, and then 2 Cork Oak.

The stand is curly claro walnut. All of the turnings and stand have been buffed with Tripoli, Diamond, and Carnuba wax. [SP]

All of these lumber came from trees, I havested from the ‘Urban Forests’ within the local communities in the Northern San Joaquin Valley of California. The Claro Walnut came from a firend’s front yard in Turlock, CA. The tree was infested and died. The Manzanita Burl came form the foot hills just east of Modesto CA. The Carob came from the streets of Turlock CA. that need to b e remove because it’s roots were tearing up the curb and the street. The Cork oak trees cames from the the Gallo Winery in Modesto. Cork oak grows in most of the world as an ornamental tree. Cork oak is very unstable and difficult to to dry and use. The Wild Cherry was gifted by a friend that had havested from a yard east of Stockton CA.

The wines in the background are my wines. I, with a group of friends, make wines. In the background are 2007 Cabernet Savingon, 2008 Zinfandel, and 2009 cabernet/Syrah blend. I have been making wine since 2001.

-- Rustfever, Central California





11 comments so far

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2751 days


#1 posted 11-28-2009 05:21 AM

Very nice Ira. Good use of the wood. None from the spalted citrus you had?

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View rustfever's profile

rustfever

624 posts in 1964 days


#2 posted 11-28-2009 05:30 AM

Have not yet turned the Spalted Citrus. I am going to try some Tomorrow.
Ira

-- Rustfever, Central California

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rustfever

624 posts in 1964 days


#3 posted 11-28-2009 05:31 AM

But I have sipped a couple of bottles of California’s finest!

-- Rustfever, Central California

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2751 days


#4 posted 11-28-2009 05:32 AM

Cool. Be sure to post some photos.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Alan's profile

Alan

443 posts in 2058 days


#5 posted 11-28-2009 05:59 AM

very nice group.

-- Alan, Prince George

View lew's profile

lew

10031 posts in 2409 days


#6 posted 11-28-2009 07:25 AM

Great Work! I like your variation of design and wood choices.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View scrappy's profile

scrappy

3505 posts in 2084 days


#7 posted 11-28-2009 08:26 AM

Great designs and wood choices. Fantastic diplay rack. Lots of veriety in the shapes of the stoppers.

Keep it up.

Scrappy

-- Scrap Wood's the best...the projects are smaller, and so is the mess!

View mmh's profile

mmh

3421 posts in 2376 days


#8 posted 11-28-2009 08:54 AM

Very impressive collection and hobbies. Not many people make their own wines AND collect their own wood and make their own wine stoppers! Are you going to take up glass blowing now to make your own bottles? :)

I get some of my woods from guys who salvage trees destined for the dump. It’s amazing what treasures they find. I’ve also collected some figured cherry, black walnut, maple from my own neighborhood. It’s quite adicting.

-- "They who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night." ~ Edgar Allan Poe

View Bob A in NJ's profile

Bob A in NJ

1145 posts in 2653 days


#9 posted 11-28-2009 04:08 PM

Good selection of shapes. Cool wood. Thanks for the idea of a simple but elegant stopper stand.

-- Bob A in NJ

View Budgie's profile

Budgie

191 posts in 2592 days


#10 posted 11-29-2009 07:10 AM

Nice Stoppers. The buggy in the back is awesome. Did you build that?

-- Bud, Central Square, NY, http://thepostnbeam.blogspot.com/

View rustfever's profile

rustfever

624 posts in 1964 days


#11 posted 11-29-2009 01:28 PM

The ‘buggy’ in the background is an International Auto Wagon, 1909. This is the first generation of the automobile. It is basically a buggy with a steering wheel and a two cylinder air-cooled motor hanging underneath. I did not do any restoration on it. I am to start a couple of ‘corrective’ projects on it soon.
It does run, albeit a bit cranky, even worse than ‘Grandpa’ the 1917 International Auto Wagon.

-- Rustfever, Central California

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