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Crosscut sled V 2.0

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Project by athomas5009 posted 04-14-2016 02:12 PM 1874 views 21 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I have been wanting a new crosscut sled since I got my cabinet saw last summer. I still had my old contractors saw and the sled but it was a basic sled and was lacking in some areas. So after doing a little research and incorporating some of my own ideas this is what I came up with.

Features:
1.) The fancy Incra adjustable Miter slides. The hardened steel ones. Make sure you break all the edges with 220grit These come with sharp edges that will scratch your saw top if they are not broken.

2) A stop block that is readily at hand without having to reach for a bulky clamp. The tounge in the rear of the block slides in the track. This keeps it square and leaves 1/8 dust clearance at the bottom.

3) Some T-track on the sled carrige so hold downs could be used for tricky cuts. I drilled a 1/2 hole near the front fence so the bolts can be removed.

4) I wanted to attach the rear fence with 1/4 bolts, tnuts and oversized holes in fence. This eliminates the Swiss cheese on the bottom during alignment. Also it makes the fence easily adjustable when necessary. I made the fences 2 1/8 thick so they were strong enough to remove the material needed to incorporate the features.

5) I also wanted oversized zero clearance plates that could be swapped out. This way I could use a dado stack, or switch out worn plates. Their made of 2 glued up pieces of 1/8 hardboard. 6-32 inserts and screws were used to hold them in place. For the bottom plate I used some tape for shims to get it flush. I didn’t want to mess with set screw and drill more holes in a thin area.

6) I wanted this sled to be bigger. I picked 47.5×26 this way I could easily make cabinet parts. My last sled was only 23” deep and it was annoying.

7) Lastly I wanted a convient method of storage. Med/Lg sleds are difficult to store without taking up shop space. I put 2×1 1/2 holes in the base so it can be stored on rubber coated hooks from the ceiling.

After calibration I got it to within .001 with the 5 cut method, then confirmed it with another round. I’m pleased with the outcome expect this sled to see a lot of use. I tried to give some tips above for anyone that try’s to make something similar.

Andrew

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.





8 comments so far

View jesinfla's profile

jesinfla

274 posts in 605 days


#1 posted 04-14-2016 02:34 PM

Thats a sweet sled – grats on the build and thx for sharing

-- They said I could be anything... So I became Sarcastic! They also said making drawers is easy... I think they lied :(

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

651 posts in 408 days


#2 posted 04-14-2016 02:53 PM

Nice sled. I like the replaceable inserts for dados and bevel cuts.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23214 posts in 2334 days


#3 posted 04-14-2016 03:57 PM

Andrew, that’s a great sled and it will be a fine addition to your shop.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Greg D's profile

Greg D

238 posts in 1419 days


#4 posted 04-14-2016 04:00 PM

Great design, thanks for the tips. I’m thinking its time to upgrade to a larger sled myself.

-- Greg D, Cen. CA, "Keep it on the Level, Do it Right the First Time!"

View athomas5009's profile

athomas5009

293 posts in 1085 days


#5 posted 04-15-2016 01:02 AM

I really like the replicable inserts as well. I think they should really help this thing stand the test of time. The metal miter glides are nice too. They can be re adjusted through holes in the base and with the 6 adjustable points it really makes getting a perfect fit east. Plus once you’ve bought them they can be reused down the road.

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.

View athomas5009's profile

athomas5009

293 posts in 1085 days


#6 posted 04-15-2016 02:20 PM

The was one minor detail I left out. The grooves in the base that are require for the insert plates are through end to end. So it leaves a gap the is roughly the thickness of the fences. Since I didn’t want to stare at an ugly gap I went ahead and cut (2)1 1/2” pieces and glues them in the gaps. This covered things up and left a little room to make inserting the ZCIs easy.

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.

View Douglas's profile

Douglas

414 posts in 2027 days


#7 posted 04-15-2016 02:22 PM

Yup, that’s the way to do it. I just finished a new one myself, and did pretty much the same things except the bolts for the rear fence – that’s a great idea. I opted for swiss cheese. Great build!

-- Douglas in Chicago - http://dcwwoodworks.com

View jcees's profile

jcees

1015 posts in 3266 days


#8 posted 04-20-2016 03:15 PM

One robust sled, similar to my own. Nice Job!

-- When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world. -- John Muir

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