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Wooden Push Bike

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Project by Helipilot posted 11-22-2009 06:44 PM 7333 views 31 times favorited 29 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This is a push bike that I built for my daughter. Having no pedals or training wheels encourages her to learn balance. The seat is 12 inches off the ground and from wheel hub to wheel hub it measures 26 inches. My daughter is almost 2 and can handle the size well. The seat also is adjustable and can move up and back. The small fender prevents her front getting caught in the tire. The bike is made from Jatoba (looks amazing in the sun) and white ash and weighs in at 11 pounds (similar to commercially built plywood bikes). The bike ended up a lot simpler than originally intended as we had to move for work. I hoped to put some stamped leather on the seat, wood burn her initials on the body, and build some wooden spoke wheels (might attempt in the future after the move). The bike is sealed with wipe-on poly which worked great. Shes getting it for Xmas this year, hope she likes it.

-- chew it off with your teeth





29 comments so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112143 posts in 2242 days


#1 posted 11-22-2009 06:45 PM

Very cool design good job

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View webwood's profile

webwood

618 posts in 1915 days


#2 posted 11-22-2009 06:47 PM

thats really cool

-- -erik & christy-

View russv's profile

russv

262 posts in 1834 days


#3 posted 11-22-2009 06:52 PM

very nice, can’t build enough toys for the kids and grandkids.

russv

-- yknotwood.com: where to go because you don't want no stinking plastic!

View Dalbergian's profile

Dalbergian

74 posts in 1865 days


#4 posted 11-22-2009 06:54 PM

Fantastic,I’m in the process of designing myself a recumbent bike out of various woods,probably Baltic Birch ply for the frame but I did consider laminating up some nice contrasting timbers as you have,in fact,I think I will…
Yours is light years better than the commercial ply bikes & probably a lot cheaper too even although you used gorgeous hardwoods.
Shes going to love it!
Favourited!

-- "Without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible." ~ Frank Zappa

View Helipilot's profile

Helipilot

9 posts in 1772 days


#5 posted 11-22-2009 06:59 PM

yeah some of those plywood bikes range up to $400. I built this one for around $100. And thats in Colorado where hardwood is ridiculous expensive especially the Jatoba.

-- chew it off with your teeth

View gmerteng's profile

gmerteng

122 posts in 1777 days


#6 posted 11-22-2009 07:12 PM

That thing is to cool. What a great design. I have a little grandson and you just gave me some great ideas. What size are the wheels on there?

-- Mert,Oshkosh WI,

View EzJack's profile

EzJack

443 posts in 1836 days


#7 posted 11-22-2009 07:41 PM

The best way to learn and has style too.
Welcome to LJs.

-- Ain't better or worse than any other woodpecker in the woods.

View mmh's profile

mmh

3434 posts in 2387 days


#8 posted 11-22-2009 07:50 PM

Very cool! But, where does one put their feet? How do you stop if you’re going fast? Or, is this more like a scooter where you are constantly pushing on level ground?

If you’re in CO, then you’re close to Al Bibbero and he has rosewood for sale!

-- "They who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night." ~ Edgar Allan Poe

View zlatanv's profile

zlatanv

689 posts in 1899 days


#9 posted 11-22-2009 07:52 PM

That is awesome!

-- Z, Rockwall, TX

View DaddyT's profile

DaddyT

267 posts in 2175 days


#10 posted 11-22-2009 08:19 PM

Thats awsome!! Would you be so kind as to tell us where you got the tires?

-- Jimi _ Measure twice, cut once.......@#%#$@!!!......measure twice, cut....

View Helipilot's profile

Helipilot

9 posts in 1772 days


#11 posted 11-22-2009 08:50 PM

The tires are 12 1/2” x 2 1/4” kendas. I think I got them from bike parts USA from there amazon store. The rims were the hardest thing to find and kinda pricey at $17/each. The rims actually measure about 8 1/4”.

But, where does one put their feet? How do you stop if you’re going fast? Or, is this more like a scooter where you are constantly pushing on level ground?

- The kid is supposed to skid there feet on the ground to stop but I have the pieces to add a rear brake in the future when she gets bigger. Not having pedals promotes balance skills. Heard it was better to learn to balance first then learn to pedal. plus you never have training wheels as a crutch. I talked to a guy at the bike shop that said he saw a 2 year old start out on a push bike and by 2 1/2 the kid was riding a small BMX on the local track.

-- chew it off with your teeth

View Helipilot's profile

Helipilot

9 posts in 1772 days


#12 posted 11-22-2009 09:05 PM

Wanted to make some bent wood fenders. Still might anyone have any experience bending this Jatoba. Tried soaking a 1/4 thick piece in boiling water for about an hour and no bend at all. I will probably build a steam box but was wondering if anyone had advice first.

-- chew it off with your teeth

View Dalbergian's profile

Dalbergian

74 posts in 1865 days


#13 posted 11-23-2009 12:06 AM

Not had any experience with Jatoba but I would definitely build a steam box & slightly reduce the thickness of the laminates too,between 1/8th & 3/16th.
You could always make them really thin 1/16th & they would bend round a form without steaming,a lot of waste with saw cuts but the finished fender would be incredibly stable & strong (I have a tendency to over engineer,belt,braces,velcro,popstuds,you name it…)

-- "Without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible." ~ Frank Zappa

View Helipilot's profile

Helipilot

9 posts in 1772 days


#14 posted 11-23-2009 12:10 AM

I am assuming that you would laminate after bending. I’m just curious how well the wood will hold the shape. Iv’e never done any steam bending before. Would I need to make the form a tighter radius than I need. My its just a matter of experimentation.

-- chew it off with your teeth

View Dalbergian's profile

Dalbergian

74 posts in 1865 days


#15 posted 11-23-2009 12:29 AM

yup,always make the form slightly tighter than the intended finished form,there’s always a little spring back although the more laminates used for a given form the less spring back will occur.
Here’s a link to a guy using a similar setup to the one I used to bend some Maple (I used a pressure cooker on a camping stove instead of the wallpaper stripper but I’ve heard the stripper is excellent.)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOIJXDZXB3g
I would also advise you to get the steamed wood into the form as soon as possible,less than 10 seconds is best.

-- "Without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible." ~ Frank Zappa

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