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Spending a Lazy Sunday in the Shop with the Kids

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Project by BrianK posted 11-09-2009 01:52 AM 1666 views 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Spending a Lazy Sunday in the Shop with the Kids
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Thought I would post a couple of projects the kids did in the shop with me today. There is nothing more fun than watching your kids get creative and have fun with their dad. These were a few ideas they drummed up using some scraps lying around the shop. My son thought it would be cool to be “organized” at school. It was really neat watching him carefully use the bandsaw to rough cut and the drill press to shape (sanding drum) and cut the pencil holes.

On the other hand, my daughter has always loved the peg game from Cracker Barrel. So she figured a way to build her own. Simple and crude but a challenge for a 9 year old none the less. She used the bandsaw cut the triangle and the drill press to cut the holes.

Professional paint jobs by both. :) I am really proud of their creativity and their love to get in the shop with me. Woodworking is not always about the self gratification or the desire to see a customer smile. It might be as simple as making a memory that will last forever for my children.

-- - Brian





11 comments so far

View dustyal's profile

dustyal

1280 posts in 3045 days


#1 posted 11-09-2009 02:12 AM

Great story… LJ’ers to be… the activity will create a lifetime of remembrances.
Thanks for sharing.

-- Al H. - small shop, small projects...

View Lenny's profile

Lenny

1531 posts in 3097 days


#2 posted 11-09-2009 03:05 AM

Wonderful post Brian. You said a mouthful. I just love seeing Dad’s active with their children. If that means shop time for all, all the better!

-- On the eighth day God was back in His woodworking shop! Lenny, East Providence, RI

View woodenships's profile

woodenships

33 posts in 2739 days


#3 posted 11-09-2009 05:22 AM

Good to see good work too.
I had my son help me with a glue up and the other clean up some dado cuts with a chisel.
I might take your lead soon.
Thanks for sharing.

-- "Safety is habit you start and always keep!"

View ladiesman217's profile

ladiesman217

74 posts in 2785 days


#4 posted 11-09-2009 06:01 AM

My father got me interested in woodworking by having me “help” him work on our one of our rental properties as a teen. It’s more like he used me to paint fences and work on frozen pipes in unheated basements in the dead of winter instead of hanging out with my friends on Sundays. Now that I think about it though, those are some of the best memories I’ve had and I learned the most from my father about everything else in the world other than what we were doing. However, he does owe me one Wu-Tang Clan t-shirt (when I asked him if acrylic paint would wash out of clothes, he said, “Sure!”, with what I now recognize as Dad’s signature white lie smile). Your kids are very lucky.

-- Rock Chalk Jayhawk!

View Junji's profile

Junji

698 posts in 2952 days


#5 posted 11-09-2009 06:05 AM

I am sure that these are really really important experience for your kids, they will remember it forever. When I was a kid, my dad made me ā€¯water mill”, I watched him doing that all the time, and I think that was the start of my woodworking.

-- Junji Sugita from Japan, http://tetra.blog12.fc2.com/

View scrappy's profile

scrappy

3506 posts in 3000 days


#6 posted 11-09-2009 07:28 AM

Allways good to spend time with the kids. I have lost production time in order to spend time with my daughter in the shop. I would do it all over again. It is worth anything for the bonding experiance alone. Of all the fun I have had in my shop, the times with her are the best. ( but the day with my grandson was a close second, stained his bird house)

Keep making sawdust together!

Scrappy

-- Scrap Wood's the best...the projects are smaller, and so is the mess!

View nmkidd's profile

nmkidd

758 posts in 2743 days


#7 posted 11-09-2009 07:57 AM

Great job by both youngsters. ......the memories of your day together will be with all of you for many years to come.

-- Doug, New Mexico.......the only stupid question is one that is never asked!........don't fix it, if it ain't broke!

View a1Jim's profile (online now)

a1Jim

115604 posts in 3147 days


#8 posted 11-09-2009 08:47 AM

Sharing fun with the kids great

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Raspar's profile

Raspar

246 posts in 2718 days


#9 posted 11-09-2009 04:57 PM

l love this, my 8 year old daughter and I do the home depot kids workshops. It is a great way to spend a hour teaching her about the craft I love and gives her basic skills. Although this weekend she got a little proud and pounded one of the little nails in in one shot so she tried to do it again and almost took off my thumb. LOL guess I will need to watch closer too. Its fun and I hope as she gets older she still wants to work with her old man.

-- Have thy tools ready. God will find thee work.

View clieb91's profile

clieb91

3516 posts in 3505 days


#10 posted 11-10-2009 03:38 AM

One of the best kinds of posts.Certainly times to cherish with our children. I am looking forward to my daughter joining me in my shop. Right now whe works outside the door in her playroom on her workbench. Can not wait to have her help me build something.

CtL

-- Chris L. "Don't Dream it, Be it."- PortablePastimes.com (Purveyors of Portable Fun and Fidgets)

View Roger's profile

Roger

20389 posts in 2374 days


#11 posted 01-07-2014 01:57 PM

Some gr8 memories going on there. Keep em involved. Nice projects

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

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