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Stickley style oak plant stand

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Project by DaleMaley posted 03-12-2016 12:59 PM 770 views 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

The December 2015 Issue of Woodworker’s Journal magazine has a neat looking Stickley style oak plant stand. I decided to build 3 of these as Christmas 2016 gifts to family members.

The 2 shelves are loose floor ceramic tiles, 12×12” nominal dimension. I guess if the plants leak water when you water them, it doesn’t hurt the ceramic tile.

The fake tenons hide the 2 screws that attach the 45 degree cross braces that support the shelves.

The large and small curved rungs are made from a pattern. I initially tried using a flush trim router bit on the router table, but I got grain tear-out on the top of the curves. I bought a new Robo-Sander, which is the equivalent of the flush trim router bit, but uses a drum sander on the drill press. I love this new Robo-sander because it eliminates the problem of tearing out wood on curved sections with end grain exposed when using patterns.

I tried 2-sided tape to hold the work piece on the pattern, but experienced too much slippage. I switched to 3 small 3/4” nails from the air nailer, which I simply pulled out with plyers when done. This worked great, and you can’t see the tiny holes left from the nails.

I have always had trouble trying to make pieces from patterns, but the combination of the Robo-sander and small air nails has finally made this a successful method for me. I intend to use this method on future projects.

I think the ladies will like these gifts :)

To see my Trials & Tribulations of making these, see my woodworking web site.

-- Dale, Illinois, http://dalemaley.webs.com/





8 comments so far

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

652 posts in 615 days


#1 posted 03-12-2016 03:15 PM

I use patterns on the router table all the time. I’m curious what tape you use and what material you use for templates.

For myself, I’m a big fan of smooth masonite for templates. The tape I find more than acceptable is double sided carpet tape, the thin stuff

A good router bit is a flush trim bit with top and bottom bearings. This allows you to flip the piece and template over and raise/lower the bit to align the other bearing. This way you can always route ‘downhill’ and avoid chipping/splintering.

Thanks for the robo-sander link! This will be great for template sanding, I really hate sanding curved. fresh cut surfaces!

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

652 posts in 615 days


#2 posted 03-12-2016 03:31 PM

Oh yeah, nice stand! Thanks for the excellent web post on your construction.

I found a few answers to my questions. Double sided tape and plywood don’t mix well, too rough of a surface!
I also have switched from a router bushing to a mortise bit
Much less frustration then trying to center a bushing, however you can’t get as tight of a corner radius (1/2”)

You used red oak, correct?

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1402 posts in 2951 days


#3 posted 03-12-2016 03:39 PM

I’ve used double-sided tape for routing patterns several times with great success. I’m glad you figured out a work-around. Part of the trick is to make sure both surfaces are dust-free. That clogs the tape. When I built my boat from templates, I used drywall screws strategically placed in waste areas, places where holes would be drilled, etc. and that worked really well. Love your project as it’s smack dab in the middle of my aesthetic. Thanks for sharing!

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View DaleMaley's profile

DaleMaley

253 posts in 1628 days


#4 posted 03-12-2016 04:40 PM

Yes, I used red oak for this project. I bought 1.5×3.5 inch red oak from Menards. The plans called for laminating rift sawn stock and 1-5/8” x 1-5/8” finished legs. I went with the solid stock and reduced the leg size to 1.5×1.5 to match my Menard’s blanks. The Menards red oak is 72 inches long, so you can get 4 legs per board if you cut them to about 35-7/8 length.

I have tried the 2-sided thin carpet tape before. It doesn’t hold well, and can be really tough to peel off the final side after you apply it to the pattern. I bought some better 2-sided tape just for this project, but it didn’t work well either.

Yes, I’m using 1/2” plywood for the pattern. The tape doesn’t stick well to it. My old plywood had a slight bend in it also, and that did not help the tape stick well either.

Pattern routing has always looked so fast and appealing to do, but I have had nothing but trouble on every project I attempted it on….............but the robo-sander and air gun nail method was excellent for this project. I made 3 tables, which takes 24 big curves and 12 small curves…...so my sample size is 36 pieces for using this method.

Thanks

-- Dale, Illinois, http://dalemaley.webs.com/

View DaleMaley's profile

DaleMaley

253 posts in 1628 days


#5 posted 03-12-2016 04:42 PM

I wish I would have invented the Robo-sander :) Here is a story about the guy who invented it.

-- Dale, Illinois, http://dalemaley.webs.com/

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2503 posts in 1649 days


#6 posted 03-12-2016 10:44 PM

Hey, Dale, those are fine looking stands and your write up is very helpful.

I agree with you about getting poor results when pattern routing. I now use a spoke shave to clean up the curves after band sawing. There must be some magic to the process that I just don’t get. I have tried larger and smaller diameter router bits, I have tried routing from both directions to avoid climb cuts, I have tried clamping the stock in a jig set to only remove 1/32” at a pass and all my efforts have been in vain. The spoke shave is my friend. :)

-- Art

View DaleMaley's profile

DaleMaley

253 posts in 1628 days


#7 posted 03-12-2016 11:04 PM



Hey, Dale, those are fine looking stands and your write up is very helpful.

I agree with you about getting poor results when pattern routing. I now use a spoke shave to clean up the curves after band sawing. There must be some magic to the process that I just don t get. I have tried larger and smaller diameter router bits, I have tried routing from both directions to avoid climb cuts, I have tried clamping the stock in a jig set to only remove 1/32” at a pass and all my efforts have been in vain. The spoke shave is my friend. :)

- AandCstyle

I am the same way, must be some secret we are missing…..........but I’m sticking with the robo-sander from now on. If I get a chance, I will try your spoke shave method. Thanks!

-- Dale, Illinois, http://dalemaley.webs.com/

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

652 posts in 615 days


#8 posted 03-12-2016 11:57 PM

The robo-sander story is interesting.

I gave up on drill press mounted sanding drums long ago simply because I could not get a smooth curve without divots, Hallelujah!

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