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Planer Jig for twisted boards

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Project by Lou posted 02-23-2016 07:21 PM 3000 views 37 times favorited 19 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Much of the wood I use for my projects is rough cut and twisted. I recently built this jig/sled to take out the twist. I actually made 2 sleds. One at 5 ft and the other at 3 feet. Obviously the risers are interchangeable. They work great. I’m very happy with the results. I copied the idea from Geekwoodworker . He shows excellent detail and a youtube video . Please ref. his work. He deserves the credit.

Very easy to make and use. Put the twisted board on top of the jig. Put some weight on the twisted board. I use a sand bag. ( my shooting bench rest). Then adjust the risers to conform to the bottom of the twisted board. Remove the weight (sand bag) and run through the planer until the top is flat and smooth. Now remove the board from the jig, turn the board over with the flat side down and run it through the planer until it’s flat on top. You now have a usable board with no twists.

-- What to make next. Hmmm.





19 comments so far

View geekwoodworker's profile

geekwoodworker

354 posts in 925 days


#1 posted 02-23-2016 07:55 PM

Thanks Lou for the credit. But I only copied the plans from the magazine. I really like your idea of having a shorter one. Sometimes I find using the longer one is a real pain.

Nice work too eh.

View Lou's profile

Lou

67 posts in 654 days


#2 posted 02-23-2016 09:57 PM

Well, Geekwoodworker, if you had not posted it on Lumberjocks, I never would have known about it. I thank you very much and at least in my mind, you deserve the credit. Thanks again, and yes, I like the short one also. I think it will get used almost as much as the larger one.

-- What to make next. Hmmm.

View MikeW's profile

MikeW

25 posts in 2518 days


#3 posted 02-23-2016 10:13 PM

I like the dual purpose cart for the lanner and sander (underneath). Do you have plans or a link to any plans for it?

View pfleming's profile

pfleming

76 posts in 679 days


#4 posted 02-23-2016 10:59 PM

Regardless who takes the credit for it, that’s a nice jig. It seems like it would be quick and easy to set up and use. I’d like to see some more info on how to make the runners that the board ride on, if you have any. I really like the way that the runners are able to slide on the main sled body. I definitely need to get to work on one of these, especially working with pallet boards…..most of them have some kind of twist to them.

-- Patrick, Mississippi

View pottz's profile

pottz

907 posts in 449 days


#5 posted 02-23-2016 11:12 PM

hey i say thanks to all involved on this sled this is a great idea well made i gotta make one of these will solve a lot of problems and with a 15” planer i can flatten a board way beyond the most expensive joiner i could buy thanks guys.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View Lou's profile

Lou

67 posts in 654 days


#6 posted 02-23-2016 11:43 PM

Hello MikeW, I really don’t have any plans for the “planer/sander”. I have a small shop and space is dear. I just thought it was a good idea so I did it. It’s just 2 stainless steal rods about 2 inches long that extend an inch into the planer platform and an inch into the sides. One on each side of the planer platform. The platform just spins around and is held in place by 4 wood tabs that you see on the top. Two in front and two in back. Hope that helps, it’s the best I got.

-- What to make next. Hmmm.

View Lou's profile

Lou

67 posts in 654 days


#7 posted 02-23-2016 11:57 PM

Helllo Pfleming,


Regardless who takes the credit for it, that s a nice jig. It seems like it would be quick and easy to set up and use. I d like to see some more info on how to make the runners that the board ride on, if you have any. I really like the way that the runners are able to slide on the main sled body. I definitely need to get to work on one of these, especially working with pallet boards…..most of them have some kind of twist to them.

- pfleming

Sorry I don’t have any more info on the riser unit/ runners. I just looked at Geekwoodworker’s post and kind of figured it out from there. I thought his post very through. See his post

-- What to make next. Hmmm.

View EFR's profile

EFR

11 posts in 332 days


#8 posted 02-24-2016 04:12 AM

So is this approach to flattening a board face better than using a jointer, or better for certain types of board defects? Certainly a good replacement for the jointer approach if your board is wider than 6 inches.

View pfleming's profile

pfleming

76 posts in 679 days


#9 posted 02-24-2016 02:02 PM

That’s fine Lou, I can figure it out. EFR, I’m not sure if this would be better than using a jointer or not, but I don’t have a jointer, so this will do for a while anyway. I have a jig for straightening the edge of boards, but nothing for flattening warped boards.

-- Patrick, Mississippi

View Mikesawdust's profile

Mikesawdust

274 posts in 2503 days


#10 posted 02-24-2016 02:30 PM

I can see this working much better than a joiner. I have access to a large joiner but flattening wide boards is hit and miss since you have to attach pieces underneath to level it if the piece is badly warped and sometimes the blade kicks them loose. I think I’m also going to build this, I love highly figured wood but getting it flat is an adventure in itself.

View kocgolf's profile

kocgolf

138 posts in 1643 days


#11 posted 02-24-2016 04:49 PM

I have been planning to build the one of these for a while, but I was planning on using the popular plans for the wedged based one with bungie cords. I forget which magazine it’s from, but it’s all over the place. Anyone know which of these might be better? This one seems like a bit more work to make, but very easy to use.

View pfleming's profile

pfleming

76 posts in 679 days


#12 posted 02-24-2016 05:40 PM

Exactly what I was thinking kocgolf. This one seems like it may take a little more time and effort to put together, but would be easier to actually use. Plus I love the fact that you can slide the supports exactly where you need them, then lock them into place.

-- Patrick, Mississippi

View Lou's profile

Lou

67 posts in 654 days


#13 posted 02-24-2016 05:55 PM

Hey Guys. I understand your concern about how much time it takes to build. It’s made from quarter inch MDF. I had to purchase the MDF, Tee nuts and quarter-20 threaded rods. Every thing else I had around my shop. It took about a day and a half to build both sleds. I’m retired and just a hobby wood worker so time isn’t critical to me, but I didn’t think a day and a half was bad. Also the knobs are made with a 2 inch hole saw. I had to buy the 2 inch bit as well.

-- What to make next. Hmmm.

View ken_c's profile

ken_c

314 posts in 2627 days


#14 posted 02-24-2016 06:34 PM

those adjustment pucks are much nicer than the wedges I have used on my jig. Thanks for the post…

View mafe's profile

mafe

11154 posts in 2553 days


#15 posted 02-24-2016 08:56 PM

Super cool.
Credits to both of you.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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