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Instructions for dovetail jig project 22450

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Project by Tim Dahn posted 10-19-2009 03:25 PM 12032 views 157 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Here are some Instructions for the Shop made dovetail jig I posted here:

Click for details

First layout and mark all of your pins, color in the waste areas to reduce any confusion when sawing.

With the jig on the saw (orientation doesn’t matter) lay your pin board down and raise the blade to just barely higher than the thickness the wood, so the pins will protrude when assembled with the tail board so after gluing you can plane them smooth for that perfect fit.

Picture 1: Use the blade kerf to position the board against the fence, start on the right edge and make your first cut just get close it’s not critical to be right on. If you end up with one tail slightly wider then the other it will just look more hand cut.

Picture 2: Move the board to right and do the middle pin(s).

Picture 3: Now flip the dovetail jig 180 degrees so you are using the other fence and repeat the cuts, this defines the pins, the shaded areas still need to be removed.

Picture 4: Shows the pins completed.

Picture 5: Position the pin board on the tail board and mark the tails

Picture 6: Cut the tails, the red lines show the cuts than can be made on the band saw. The blue shows the part that you need to cut out with a chisel. Cut very close to the line but leave it, go slow here, take your time on these cuts. You will need to clean these up by paring to the line.

Hope this helps.

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.





14 comments so far

View Woodbutchery's profile

Woodbutchery

279 posts in 2307 days


#1 posted 10-19-2009 03:43 PM

Tim, great instructions. I’m actually encouraged to build this jig and try it out.

Thanks for the project, and the documentation!

-- Making scrap with zen-like precision - Woodbutchery

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112515 posts in 2298 days


#2 posted 10-19-2009 05:13 PM

Thanks Tim a big help.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View dustyal's profile

dustyal

1208 posts in 2197 days


#3 posted 10-19-2009 05:15 PM

thanks for taking the time to post this… much appreciated.

Do you know the angle (or ratio) the fence boards are set on your jig? You mentioned you used a gauge. I understand it can vary depending on what you want the dovetails to look like… I just curious as to what you used here.

Thinking about this… I wondering if I can do a similar jig for use on my router table. My TS isn’t that great and I don’t have flat bottom blades for it… A TS and blades is high on my list…

-- Al H. - small shop, small projects...

View Tim Dahn's profile

Tim Dahn

1474 posts in 2286 days


#4 posted 10-19-2009 06:16 PM

Glad it helps, I used the hardwood marking gauge from Veritas, it’s 1:8 ratio for hardwood.

I’m sure this will work on a router table also

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile (online now)

TopamaxSurvivor

15015 posts in 2397 days


#5 posted 10-19-2009 08:31 PM

Thanks, I’ve been thinking of tying something to speed up hand cuts, this looks like the real deal!!

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View russv's profile

russv

262 posts in 1891 days


#6 posted 10-20-2009 01:43 AM

I just made my own layout marking gauge. It is based on Rob Cosman’s design. It is a 1:7 ratio and now that I have used it a couple of times, I’ll make others with different angles. It took me about 1/2 hour to make. I used 1/4” hardboard that was smooth on both sides. see my projects for pics

russv

-- yknotwood.com: where to go because you don't want no stinking plastic!

View mtkate's profile

mtkate

2049 posts in 2047 days


#7 posted 10-20-2009 01:48 AM

Neat-o!

View Napaman's profile

Napaman

5365 posts in 2798 days


#8 posted 10-20-2009 03:30 AM

this one is going in me favorites…thanks…

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

View Tim Dahn's profile

Tim Dahn

1474 posts in 2286 days


#9 posted 10-22-2009 03:08 AM

Glad to pass this on, hope it works as well for everyone as it has for me.

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

View BigTiny's profile

BigTiny

1664 posts in 1610 days


#10 posted 08-31-2010 11:11 AM

Instead of chiseling out the waste, you can use a coping saw to take most of it, then trim to fit with the chisel. This avoids the chance of breaking the points.

-- The nicer the nice, the higher the price!

View Tim Dahn's profile

Tim Dahn

1474 posts in 2286 days


#11 posted 08-31-2010 11:18 PM

@BigTiny, good tip. I usually end up taking most of the waste out at the band saw then trimming but a coping saw would be a good alternative.

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

View TheHarr's profile

TheHarr

103 posts in 2260 days


#12 posted 12-11-2010 04:03 PM

Hey Timbo, this looks like a great idea. I gotta try it when the weather warms up. Its no fun holding frozen metal tools with your bare hands and your glasses are steamed up with frozen water vapor. I’ll be sure to have some questions for you in the Spring so keep your notes around. I’ll be needing them.

-- The wood is good.

View Tim Dahn's profile

Tim Dahn

1474 posts in 2286 days


#13 posted 12-16-2010 03:29 AM

Thanks Harr,
I know what you mean on the ice cold tools. Just shoot me a message whenever you get to try this and I will help all I can.

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

View wiskeyweasel's profile

wiskeyweasel

33 posts in 877 days


#14 posted 07-13-2012 08:15 PM

Definitely making one of these. I love this site!

-- They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.

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