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Chess boards

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Project by Mr M's Woodshop posted 02-11-2016 10:54 PM 892 views 7 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

My # 1 request at craft fairs … “do you make chess boards?” So I made a bunch just to answer the question and (hopefully) allow people to buy them.

These all did sell, though they didn’t sell quickly. That was fine by me … until the last one sold. Now I have to make another batch, or I’m going to be hearing the question all over again.

  1. 1: Black Walnut & Hard Maple, with a Goncalo Alves border.
  2. 2: Padauk & Honey Locust, with a Cherry border.
  3. 3: Mahogany & White Oak, with a Black Walnut border.
  4. 4 & 5: 200-year-old Redwood & White Oak, with a Bloodwood accent & White Oak border.

All feature 2” squares. #s 1 – 3 are approximately 18” square. # 4 was 20” square.

-- Henry Mowry, Santa Clarita, CA, http://www.MowryJournal.com





10 comments so far

View Luqman's profile

Luqman

10 posts in 826 days


#1 posted 02-12-2016 02:03 AM

It would be a pleasure to move pieces on those boards. Nice job.

-- Associate yourself with people of good quality, for it is better to be alone than in bad company. -Booker T. Washington

View blue77's profile

blue77

115 posts in 375 days


#2 posted 02-12-2016 07:13 AM

You did a wonderful job on those boards the Black Walnut & Hard Maple is my favorite. Thanks for showing a variety of different woods, one day I’d like to make one and this will help.

-- I love my lathe. It’s old, not too pretty and I don’t really know how to use it… Love it!

View splinter56's profile

splinter56

2 posts in 496 days


#3 posted 02-12-2016 07:10 PM

Nice work. I am in the process of building one of these with my son when he is home from working abroad.

How are you accounting for wood movement, assuming that the squares are solid wood, or did you use veneer.

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3338 posts in 3363 days


#4 posted 02-13-2016 02:50 AM

I really like the corner treatment in the last picture. They all look really good.

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

View Mr M's Woodshop's profile

Mr M's Woodshop

394 posts in 2535 days


#5 posted 02-13-2016 04:15 PM

Thanks, everyone.

The last board was fun to make, but ended up being too big for easy transport to craft fairs: I really need boards that are 18” or under to fit into my containers!

-- Henry Mowry, Santa Clarita, CA, http://www.MowryJournal.com

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3338 posts in 3363 days


#6 posted 02-14-2016 04:52 AM

Henry – I got to thinking about these boards and I’ve come back around to look again. At first I was not too enamored with the look of the main picture. But I’ve changed my mind. In reality that black streaks in the frame actually gives it an “antique” like look.

I’m glad to see you build to the containers you have. I mostly do the same thing. I do take a few larger pieces to my shows and use those as an attraction that would catch the eyes of people from a long way off to peak interest in my booth. That works pretty well to get more traffic to my booth.

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

View Mr M's Woodshop's profile

Mr M's Woodshop

394 posts in 2535 days


#7 posted 02-14-2016 04:49 PM

When I take boards to craft shows, my experience is that if it’s not in a container (or at least completely protected) in transit, it will get scratched.

Yes, I’ve learned from experience!

Therefore, I put every board in a plastic container or a cardboard box or something – even if its just to wrap the over-sized board in a towel. Every board is protected, from storage to transit to display – and back again.

-- Henry Mowry, Santa Clarita, CA, http://www.MowryJournal.com

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3338 posts in 3363 days


#8 posted 02-14-2016 08:00 PM

Completely agree about protecting the boards in transit. I’ve gotten a large flat container that goes under the bed for the larger pieces. I use a sheet between each board and use a small pad after the last one to protect it from the lid. Seems to do the trick.

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

View McFly's profile

McFly

188 posts in 495 days


#9 posted 02-15-2016 09:30 PM

Got a few questions:
How thick are these boards? Looks like they’re all solid wood, so I’m wondering how thin I could go before bowing/warping / other movement becomes a concern.

Also, what price range do these typically settle into?

I had a co-worker ask me to build one, but have no idea what to charge.

View Mr M's Woodshop's profile

Mr M's Woodshop

394 posts in 2535 days


#10 posted 02-16-2016 04:05 PM


How thick are these boards? Looks like they re all solid wood, so I m wondering how thin I could go before bowing/warping / other movement becomes a concern.

Also, what price range do these typically settle into?

I made the playing surfaces from 3/4” stock, so they ended up at about 5/8” thick. I had no warping issues. The frame around the first boards was 1” thick x 3/4” wide, and was mitered/glued/pinned to the playing surface. The final board with the wider border has a dado holding the playing surface on the white oak frame.

I sold the first three boards at $50, which was too low, in my humble opinion. I get $80 for Lazy Susans that are the same size (in their case, about 18” diameter). I believe my next chess boards will have the dado frame and be priced at $75.

-- Henry Mowry, Santa Clarita, CA, http://www.MowryJournal.com

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