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Cutting Boards

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Project by gabriellus posted 02-09-2016 06:15 PM 892 views 1 time favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

After finishing the outdoor table, I was DONE. I packed up the shop and could finally park my car in the garage for a little while. I didn’t watch woodworking YouTube videos or podcasts or anything, I was DONE.

So that only lasted a few weeks and I found myself at the lumber dealer for some unknown reason, like a flies to a lightbulb. Picked up some cherry, walnut and maple to go with some basswood I had already. Cut the pieces to length on the tablesaw crosscut sled. Using my shopmade jointer jig I jointed one side. Through the planer for thickness. Ripped to width. I glued up 7 long-grain panels, then crosscut those to make end-grain pieces to the height of the finished boards. I glued sacrificial rails to all sides of each board so I could pass them through the thickness planer without concern. The handle recesses are routed with a cove bit with bearing, and all the edges are routed with a less-severe roundover bit as well. Sanded a sh$%load up to 220 grit. Put my brand on each board, and finished with much much mineral oil. Them’s thirsty boards.

One of them was built to exacting specifications for the wife, the rest have been given out as gifts.





10 comments so far

View scottishbob's profile

scottishbob

166 posts in 1755 days


#1 posted 02-09-2016 06:50 PM

nice work , making a few right now
you passed end grain through the planer ?!? I thought that was not to be done ! what planer have you got ?

how did you put the “sign” on the edge , very cool

-- Ireland, Galway .... fingers! "we dont sell them"

View Mr M's Woodshop's profile

Mr M's Woodshop

394 posts in 2535 days


#2 posted 02-09-2016 06:53 PM

I also do routed handholds on the ends … did you have a problem with tear out, as you routed across the grain? What did you do?

-- Henry Mowry, Santa Clarita, CA, http://www.MowryJournal.com

View gabriellus's profile

gabriellus

47 posts in 845 days


#3 posted 02-09-2016 06:56 PM


nice work , making a few right now
you passed end grain through the planer ?!? I thought that was not to be done ! what planer have you got ?

Grizzly benchtop planer, nothing crazy. The sacrificial rails that you glue on the sides keep the end grain from splitting, eliminate snipe, and locks the board together. You do have to take tiny tiny passes though. Video


how did you put the “sign” on the edge , very cool

Bic lighter brand

View gabriellus's profile

gabriellus

47 posts in 845 days


#4 posted 02-09-2016 07:00 PM


I also do routed handholds on the ends … did you have a problem with tear out, as you routed across the grain? What did you do?

- Mr M s Woodshop


I did mine in 2 passes, I don’t remember tearout truth be told. (I just edited the post, it wasn’t a roundover bit, it was a cove bit with bearing. )I went slow as she goes, thats for sure. Oh yeah, I remember putting the board in a vise, on end, then clamping some scrap wood to the top edge, creating a larger surface for the router base to rest on. That helped alot.

View EggMan's profile

EggMan

66 posts in 1242 days


#5 posted 02-10-2016 12:13 PM

I am curious about the planing technique you are using. Even at small passes and long grain sacrificial pieces, I would think it is very dangerous and only a matter of time or that “wrong” grain catching the cutter head.

Anyone else have comments?

View EggMan's profile

EggMan

66 posts in 1242 days


#6 posted 02-10-2016 12:14 PM

Very nice boards though o like the cutouts, I did something similar with some thick boards.

View TexasToddT's profile

TexasToddT

22 posts in 388 days


#7 posted 02-10-2016 12:46 PM

I love making EG cutting boards. I just finished a set of 6 between early December and mid-January. I have access to a wood shop which has a very large planer (it can plane up to just over 2 feet wide). They have a drum sander, but it’s broken so I used the planer after my glue up with the end grain up.

For the first batch of three, I used a non-hardwood sacrificial piece of wood (longgrain to the piece) and only had the sacrificial piece on the end to hit the blades last (i.e., I fed the piece through with the sacrificial piece facing me) and only had one board with mild tear out. The other were just fine. I made very small passes, no more than .5 mm per pass.

For the second batch of 3, I used a piece of scrap hardwood (longgrain to the piece) and also took small passes, .5 to .75 mm per pass and had no tear out whatever.

For all 6 boards, I used a crosscut radial arm saw to saw off the sacrificial piece.

-- TT

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23214 posts in 2334 days


#8 posted 02-10-2016 04:43 PM

This is a real beauty.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View ScottM's profile

ScottM

347 posts in 1614 days


#9 posted 02-10-2016 06:22 PM

Nice boards. I’m going to have to make one of those straight line rip jigs….

I’ve run end grain boards through the planer in the same way; sacrificial rails on the leading and trailing edges. No problems, but as stated every time anyone mentions it, very light passes.

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

9171 posts in 2335 days


#10 posted 02-12-2016 09:30 AM

Impressive collection of boards, they look very nice.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

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