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Carrousel Table Saw Blade Guard

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Project by Bricofleur posted 02-08-2016 04:24 PM 1355 views 7 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

If like me you’re one of those who don’t use the factory blade guard at the table saw, you will probably be interested by my new spinning table saw blade guard.

You only need two 1/4” Plexiglas strips, double-side tape, masking tape, a 1/4” bolt or pin, a block of hardwood, a washer and a knob. The masking tape is used temporarily to draw center a line on both Plexi strips.

When you push the stock through the blade, your push stick pushes a wing and brings along another after it passes the blade.

Awesome instead of awkward.

Thanks for looking.

Find more photos and construction details on this page of my blog.

Best,

Serge

http://atelierdubricoleur.wordpress.com

-- Learn from yesterday, work today and enjoy success tomorrow. -- http://atelierdubricoleur.wordpress.com





15 comments so far

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

16951 posts in 2649 days


#1 posted 02-08-2016 04:27 PM

Very interesting project, nice design should serve you well friend.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View Bricofleur's profile

Bricofleur

1360 posts in 2653 days


#2 posted 02-08-2016 04:32 PM

@ Ken90712 : Thank you my friend. I’m glad I came up with this guard to prevent more nicks on my thumb as I did on January 1st. Let’s count 10 !

Best,

Serge

-- Learn from yesterday, work today and enjoy success tomorrow. -- http://atelierdubricoleur.wordpress.com

View BigAl98's profile

BigAl98

140 posts in 2499 days


#3 posted 02-08-2016 04:37 PM

Very ingenius. I would think it also encourages the use of a push stick, rather than using your hands.

-- Al,New Jersey -To thine own self be true

View Timzwoodz's profile

Timzwoodz

17 posts in 990 days


#4 posted 02-08-2016 06:02 PM

You might want to consider a clamp-on version for those who don’t have the toggle bolt fences. I also think you could submit a design patent on this and get a company like Rockler or Lee Valley to come up with mass manufacturing capacity

-- Being half Irish and half Scottish, I love to drink but hate to pay for it

View Bricofleur's profile

Bricofleur

1360 posts in 2653 days


#5 posted 02-08-2016 08:53 PM

@ Timzwoodz : All good suggestions ! All you need is a pivot point.

@ BigAl98 : Yes it does encourage the use of a push stick.

Best,

Serge

-- Learn from yesterday, work today and enjoy success tomorrow. -- http://atelierdubricoleur.wordpress.com

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

651 posts in 401 days


#6 posted 02-08-2016 09:54 PM

What exactly does that accomplish? Seems your hand can still slip and engage the blade. A standard, factory blade guard will not allow your hand to contact the blade, or it is very near impossible.

Maybe an explanation would help to better understand how this is intended to work and provide safety.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

View kiefer's profile

kiefer

4881 posts in 2127 days


#7 posted 02-08-2016 10:10 PM

SERGE
I would like to see a video of it in action as I am not sure how it works but it looks like an interesting idea .

Klaus

-- Kiefer https://www.youtube.com/user/woodkiefer1/videos

View DW833's profile

DW833

190 posts in 1343 days


#8 posted 02-09-2016 03:04 AM

Serge,

I’m with Bill and Kiefer on this one. Not sure what it accomplishes. If the push stick and jig is used, the blade is covered by the guard. Without the jig the hand would be the same distance from the blade at the start of the cut and is not in danger. Once the blade guard is moved by the push stick, the hand is exposed the same place to the blade as without the jig. Keep up the good work and thanks for posting many great jigs. I’ve build several and they worked great.

View Shuja's profile

Shuja

260 posts in 1027 days


#9 posted 02-09-2016 02:46 PM

I think it is quite an interesting start to a great design.
Let’s give suggestions for improvement.

-- shuja

View Bricofleur's profile

Bricofleur

1360 posts in 2653 days


#10 posted 02-09-2016 02:49 PM

@ Kiefer : Klaus, I’m not very good at shooting videos, therefore two photos to demonstrate what the guard does. Imagine them as two snap shots from a video as well as a hand holding the push stick !

@ Builinbkyn & DW833 : My guard is not a factory guard, therefore does not pretend providing the same protection. I hope the following photos will help to understand such other kind of protection. One thing, it encourages the user to use a push stick.

I designed the guard to get some kind of protection because I don’t use the factory blade guard. It certainly focuses my attention to what I’m doing !

Best,

-- Learn from yesterday, work today and enjoy success tomorrow. -- http://atelierdubricoleur.wordpress.com

View smitdog's profile

smitdog

229 posts in 1566 days


#11 posted 02-09-2016 02:57 PM

Invention is a trial and error process. That being said, I personally would not use this design and here’s why. When it finally gets hung up on something or doesn’t spin freely like expected then it may aid in producing a nasty kick back. If it hangs up in the position that your first photo is in, you’ll be pushing into a diagonal that will divert your forward push along the diagonal toward the back of the blade. So your hand, push block and/or work piece are going to be twisted toward the back of the blade. May never happen and not sure if having something like this is better than nothing at all… I see the thought process, I just don’t think I’d be using this one. Keep experimenting!

-- Jarrett - Mount Vernon, Ohio

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

9097 posts in 2328 days


#12 posted 02-09-2016 04:14 PM

Very interesting solution and you see what you are doing – clear view.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

651 posts in 401 days


#13 posted 02-09-2016 10:50 PM

Serge, I looked at some of the other jigs and shop fixtures you posted and see the utility and genius in them. However I fail to see that in this. I noticed in your photos, the blade does not extend to the expected cutting height for the stock. Doing so would highlight the issue I see with it, that the users hand will still be near the spinning blade. With that said, I don’t see what utility this provides. It won’t prevent kickback and it doesn’t protect the user from encountering the blade in an unforeseen event. Encouraging the use of a push-stick is fine, but even there I see this could actually cause issues in that regard too. Negotiating thru the spinning “guard” could be an issue as a distraction.

Oh well, I will still be visiting you homepage for the plans to some of the other jigs. Some looked to be very useful and well thought out.

@ Kiefer : Klaus, I m not very good at shooting videos, therefore two photos to demonstrate what the guard does. Imagine them as two snap shots from a video as well as a hand holding the push stick !

@ Builinbkyn & DW833 : My guard is not a factory guard, therefore does not pretend providing the same protection. I hope the following photos will help to understand such other kind of protection. One thing, it encourages the user to use a push stick.

I designed the guard to get some kind of protection because I don t use the factory blade guard. It certainly focuses my attention to what I m doing !

Best,

- Bricofleur

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

View Bricofleur's profile

Bricofleur

1360 posts in 2653 days


#14 posted 02-10-2016 04:17 PM

Bill, I am far than being a table saw safety expert, I am just a humble woodworking willing to share his projects or finds. I feel this guard safe enough for me to prevent injuries like the one that happened to my right thumb (nick only) on January 1st. I was so excited when I came up with this particular guard that I thought it could help someone out there in the woodworking community.

To add more information about my two last photos, this is a mock-up only, I was not planning to cut this blank, therefore neither the rip fence and the saw blade were set accordingly.

Thank you for your comments that will certainly help LJs to take this opportunity to think about safety.

Best,

Serge

-- Learn from yesterday, work today and enjoy success tomorrow. -- http://atelierdubricoleur.wordpress.com

View mafe's profile

mafe

11135 posts in 2549 days


#15 posted 03-03-2016 10:23 PM

Good thinking Serge.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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